Mud fever problem

bailey14

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My horse (WB) has mud fever for the first time since owning him (five years). He's been at his present yard virtually all of this time and been out in the same paddock for about the last eighteen months. A couple of weeks ago (27th April) ends ago I noticed when brushing his cannon bone that he had the start of mud fever so investigated and discovered it was in his heels too. I treated with hibiscrub and warm water to remove the scabs, and througly dried the area before putting on Diprobase cream which is an emoillient and something the doctor prescribed me for excema ages ago. This discovery of mud fever corresponded with the weekend (26th April) when he went on a pleasure ride and got muddy fetlocks/heels. Could it have been that my horse picked up mud fever from this pleasure ride, ie. the bacteria present in the mud? I thought a horse had to be exposed to the same mud bacteria constantly for a period of time? Other people have suggested it could be the grass being wet in the paddock thats made him contract mud fever. I am now treating it with hibiscrub, drying, and sudocreme and if no better by next week will ask the vet about it when he goes into hospital for the day at the vet practice. I would have expected it to have got better by now, this is day 9 or 10 of treating it religously every day, I saw a slight difference in previous horses (at different yards) within 3 or 4 days previously. What's going on and why contract mud fever in May????
 

Silverspring

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Could be from the pleasure ride, could be the wether temperature etc could be that the bacteria has always been there but never got into his system. Mud fever is a fickle thing and I've given up trying to reason the why and how they get it. I just treat the mud fever with camrosa shampoo once a week then put camrosa on the scabby area every day for a fortnight and it clears up pretty quick. My girl had mudfever during the wind that cleared up completely, it's not back in one leg only
smirk.gif
as I say given up even trying to figure out how this happens!
 

Dogstar

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I'd say it was fom the pleasure ride. My horse never gets mud fever from her field (which is muddy clay) but frequently picks it up from hunting; I think sometimes from putting her feet in mud where an infected horse has been and other times from certain areas which have 'bad' mud and always seem to cause mudfever if not removed thoroughly.
 

Tnavas

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Mud fever starts as a fungal infection and if the skin is then broken a bacterial infection can set in. Don't force the scabs off - apart from being very painful for the horse it breaks the skin and allows the bacteria in - then you have swollen legs and lameness.

The best thing is to wash his legs with Nizeral - It's a human anti dandruff shampoo that contains Ketaconisol. Dilute in warm water and use a face cloth to lather up the shampoo on his legs. You will find some of the scabs will come away with no resistance. Leave to dry and then repeat daily until all the scabs have gone.

My yearling only allowed me to do hers once and the mudfever has gone.
 

wyldstallionguy

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Nizoral alone probably wont be enough to do the trick as it is only antifungal and the majority of mud fever cases are bacterial which can then become fungal.

Water is the enemy here so making the area wet only helps to promote & spread the infection.

I've had numerous hunter liveries over the years with terrible mud fever so have had a fair amount of experience treating it successfully and quickly.

'Fungatrol' works excently. Also last year bought a new natural salve that contains tea tree and it cleared up a severe case in a few days.

Another natural treatment is honey mixed with BITTER ALMOND OIL but be careful as the bitter almond is toxic and only a few drops are needed in a couple tbsp of honey. Honey salso naturally antibiotic.

Hope this helps.
 
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