need help with some course work!! - RE stabling and turnout!

StormyMoments

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18 March 2011
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im helping my cousin with her horse management course work but im a bit stuck and its a bit difficult as she lives in manchester and i live in guildford :eek:

so i was wondering if any of you lovely people could help!!

i dont want this to turn in to a debate about how its wrong to keep horses in etc! answers on a postcard please :)

Explain the BENEFITS for the horse AND rider of keeping a horse perminently stabled.

Explain the BENEFITS for the horse AND rider of keeping a horse living out all the time.

Explain the BENEFITS for the horse AND rider of keeping a horse living both stabled and turned out.

i could only think of less chance of injury stabled and less grooming... other then that nothing and then it being more natural for a horse to be out but that doesnt benefit the rider so if anyone could help me i would really appriciate it!!

i have vanilla ice cream on offer or hot chocolate with malteasers and whipped cream!!
 

Adopter

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Some thoughts which may help.

Full time stabling is really on suitable for animals who are in a lot of work and getting a lot of exercise, in the past many working animals lived in all the time, and pit ponies never saw day light. Some people with very valuable horses do not like to risk them going out in field and getting injured.
Stable/box rest is also used for animals in recovery and is an important part of this.
Keeping horses stabled is time consuming and needs constant attention at regular times through out the day .

24/7 turnout is natural expecially for native ponies, they get the nutrients they need from the grass, excercise and keep interested and many do best this way. The advantage for owner is that although daily checks are needed, it does take up less time than a stabled horse. Disadvantages are mainly to do with weather - muddy fields and ponies which take time to sort.

For many the part turn out part stabling is a great solution, it means that animals can be clipped so they can work/compete in winter, but they can still go into field to relax and behave naturally. In summer often stabling is used to restrict grazing or avoid flies/midges or sunstroke. This method is not quite so time consuming for the owner as fully stabled as horse will not need as many feeds etc and helps owners who are at work during the day.
 

mandwhy

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Pretty much what adopter said... Ok so just the benefits...

Full time stabling gives the owner complete control over a horse's environment, mainly diet so the horse cannot consume any more calories than given. Apparently less chance of injury and stops horses from being bloated on grass, they will probably be quite fresh for work. Some people think it creates a better bond between horse and rider as horse relies completely on owner for everything (can you tell I rather disagree with this and think it is incredibly selfish!). The horse will be less muddy and less prone to thrush and mud fever, rain scald and other such things. Also keeps them away from insects/heat bothering them in summer.

Full time turnout benefits the horse in many more ways than the first option, a horse's digestive system of designed to be processing small amounts of forage all the time while the horse moves around, feeding from the ground is better for the muscles as is the freedom of movement, so theoretically less chance of colic and other things like filled legs. Unfortunately the type of grazing we mostly have does mean the grass is often too rich and sugary. Turnout is essential for a horse's mental health and provides them with time to unwind especially if out with company to have social 'play' time along with mutual grooming, rolling etc. The horse is getting exercise turned out. Also provides variation in diet from grasses and herbs and hedgerows. Better for general mobility and health of joints etc to keep moving.
Part stabling allows the owner to combine the ability to restrict diet part of the day, and also to turnout at the best time such as at night time in summer when the sugars in grass are lower, or when it is not very bad weather in winter. It provides a time to dry off which is especially good for mud fever sufferers. Also a time to get out of the heat and away from insects
- useful to sweet itch sufferers. More convenient for owners to have horse clean and ready for work in stable, without sacrificing their need for turnout. Also useful to have a bit of handling time in stable and horses usually pleased to come in for food and stable rather than only being caught for work.
 

LD&S

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8 June 2012
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South East Kent
Some thoughts which may help.

Full time stabling is really on suitable for animals who are in a lot of work and getting a lot of exercise, in the past many working animals lived in all the time, and pit ponies never saw day light. Some people with very valuable horses do not like to risk them going out in field and getting injured.
Stable/box rest is also used for animals in recovery and is an important part of this.
Keeping horses stabled is time consuming and needs constant attention at regular times through out the day .

24/7 turnout is natural expecially for native ponies, they get the nutrients they need from the grass, excercise and keep interested and many do best this way. The advantage for owner is that although daily checks are needed, it does take up less time than a stabled horse. Disadvantages are mainly to do with weather - muddy fields and ponies which take time to sort.

For many the part turn out part stabling is a great solution, it means that animals can be clipped so they can work/compete in winter, but they can still go into field to relax and behave naturally. In summer often stabling is used to restrict grazing or avoid flies/midges or sunstroke. This method is not quite so time consuming for the owner as fully stabled as horse will not need as many feeds etc and helps owners who are at work during the day.
Agree with all the above points but with regard to safety depending on the horse you could argue for all three being safer.
Some horses are complete tw*ts charging about in the field and can be difficult and dangerous to catch.
Some I wouldn't fancy picking feet etc in a confined space.
When turning a horse out that has been stabled for several horse they can get quite excited at the prospect of a gallop round and can be difficult to lead even lashing out etc.

Stabled horses might be time consuming to muck out but it is all in one place and you don't have the problem of wading through ankle deep mud pushing a barrow and having to wander across a couple of acres looking for poo, I think mucking out could be quicker

It's like most things, it's not clear cut.
 

HardySoul1

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Good replies already.
Advantage of FT stabling includes horse is instantly available for riding or whatever: no walking from yard to distant paddock to catch and bring in = convenient and saves time.
 

AshTay

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Usually cheaper for owner/rider to keep a horse turned out more than kept in.
I would argue that it's easier to groom a muddy horse than a poo-ey horse - dried mud drops off, poo sticks like.. well, poo!!

Horses with more turnout may retain fitness better than stabled horses as they're using their muscles much more- a clear advantage to the rider.

I've also found that horses which live out are much less likely to be idiots when ridden in wind/rain simply because they're used to being out in it - another advantage for the rider.
 

FairyLights

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There isnt less grooming with stabling. there may even be more.a stabled horse needs a thorough grooming "strapping" each and every day.
A BHS stable management course would be beneficial to you. Could you contact the BHS and arrange for a course of lessons?
 

giveitago

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There's quite alot of horse stuff already.

So, human benefits....

Horse in ..dont have to change boots before riding.

Part time t/o. You only have to walk in the mud twice a day.

Full t/o...you get to shop endlessly in tack shops for various jackets, boots, brushes, gloves, rugs, hats :p
 

vieshot

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Horse in - always clean(er) so time to get ready to ride is shorter, no mud fever, rain scald etc, peace of mind knowing horse is in when weather bad, less chance of injury as no other horse to fight with, no muddy feet from field traipsing, no need to buy multiple rugs-stables only which are normally cheaper.
 

corbleu

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11 February 2009
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Hey there, happy to help!
Advantages for stabling full time: tbh I don't do this often unless for veterinary reasons or if we have snow on the ground (it's quite slippy out front of our boxes once snow lays on top of ice). I guess benefits for the owner are reduced time on things like grooming a muddy horse, reduced instance of injury and weather-related illness (mud fever e.g.) and easier to restrict diet for those that need it e.g. those coming off colic or laminitis. Disadvantages - if they're not worked regularly filled legs are a real problem, as is becoming a tad stir-crazy if they don't get rid of excess energy! Also lack of social interaction can lead to boredom problems such as windsucking (speaking from my experience with ex-racers who were rarely turned out during their careers several of them have either windsucked or crib-bitten stables doors down to the ground!!).
Advantages for living out: Cheaper usually! Yes you do need to spend money on good quality rugs and they often need more feed than those living in or on a combined system as they use a lot of energy keeping warm but actually stabling costs and bedding costs are reduced. If they're kept in a herd the social interaction and chance to stretch their legs as and when they want means, in my experience, reduction in "undesirable" behaviours e.g. windsucking, crib-biting. Disadvantages include that they often need more care than those living in or on combined systems if they're going to stay happy and healthy over winter. Rugs need checking regularly to make sure they aren't rubbing, water troughs need checking for freezing, quite often they will need additional feed to those kept on combined systems and they need access to good shelter so if you don't have a natural border it can mean expense on things like field shelters. Also fencing needs checking regularly and the horses will need a good groom and check over regularly looking for minor wounds that can be hidden under mud, mud fever, rain scald etc... Can also be difficult to settle them if you do need to bring them in for any reason e.g. veterinary care
Combined system: Personally I prefer this. The horses still get the social interaction with each other, chance to groom and kick their heels up and act like lunatics (what can I say, they're all Thoroughbreds!). Also less problems such as filled/swollen legs, the windsuckers don't seem to do it as much, less incidence of mud fever and less weight loss as they're not spending long periods out in the cold (they usually go out between 9 and 10am and come in just before dark so around 3-4pm). Disadvantages are mainly that it's very time-consuming because not only are you doing all the things you would do for a fully stabled horse but also all the things you would do for a fully turned out horse. Also works out fairly expensive as rugs are needed for turnout but feed and bedding is needed as you would for a fully stabled horse. Disadvantages for them, to be honest, I think are few and far between and I like to think they're getting the best of both worlds.
 
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