New horse, new yard

Summit

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My new horse arrives next week, am very excited but not sure how best to help him settle to a new home and new owner?

He’s a 7 year old TB. What I’m concerned about is napping as he’s going to have an overload of emotions to deal with. Should I just spend a few weeks grooming him and being around him then introduce some leading out in hand to get him used to the area? I’m concerned that if I get on him the next day he’ll plant himself (and wondering who the hell I am)!

Should I build trust and confidence between us first?

Thanks for any advice
 

be positive

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I am a great believer in keeping a horse in a similar routine to the one it was in before, it will have been tried before buying and lots of questions asked so you should have an idea of what you are taking on, forget his emotions and give him a reason to settle in by getting on with working him, yes he may be a little upset, he may test the water a bit but don't make excuses before he even arrives, start out with a positive attitude and deal with any problems as they arise, if you have taken on a horse that is a bit more challenging than expected get professional help as soon as you can to ensure his behaviour does not go downhill from day 1.

If I had sold you the horse and read this I would be rather concerned and be encouraging you to have lessons from day 1 if he is a nice well educated horse, which I hope he is as you sound rather overwhelmed by him.
 

Summit

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I am a great believer in keeping a horse in a similar routine to the one it was in before, it will have

If I had sold you the horse and read this I would be rather concerned and be encouraging you to have lessons from day 1 if he is a nice well educated horse, which I hope he is as you sound rather overwhelmed by him.
I’m not overwhelmed nor do I need lessons....I find your reply a little insulting.

I simply asked as there are 100’s of posts about nappy horses and riders not.building a bond or trust with their horse.

I just want to start off correctly to prevent any problems
 

Auslander

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I’m not overwhelmed nor do I need lessons....I find your reply a little insulting.

I simply asked as there are 100’s of posts about nappy horses and riders not.building a bond or trust with their horse.

I just want to start off correctly to prevent any problems
Be Positive is trying to help you.

I think you're overthinking this. Unless the horse is a known napper, there is no reason to suspect that a change of ownership/home will turn him into one. I go with the "innocent until proved guilty" approach with new horses on my yard. I'm prepared for them to be a bit spooky/reactive while they are settling in, but I don't go looking for problems where they don't exist.

I would suggest that you what the horse is used to.If he's fit, and used to working every day, you may well find that just grooming and handwalking him will result in a very fresh horse, who is far more likely to start throwing his weight around

Everyone needs lessons btw.The day I stop learning, is the day I give up
 

Sophire

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I agree with both Auslander and BP and would say that maybe your initial post does not come across as though you are experienced in this scenario.

I'm another who would suggest keeping the horse in the same routine, I'm also an advocate for if not an obviously upset horse, to get on the same day. You build your trust and relationship with the horse by positive joint experiences more-so than grooming. Nothing wrong with having some lessons either, an eye on the ground is always helpful, not least when you and a new horse are getting used to each other!
 

Leo Walker

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My just backed 5yr old arrived and went straight to work. Theres been the odd thing thats worried her a little but I've been calm and consistent until I got what I wanted from her. i've actively sought out spooky things to expose her to. A couple of weeks in and she now trusts me when I ask her to do something.

How on earth will you build this mythical bond by brushing and walking him round like a dog?
 

Smogul

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I’m not overwhelmed nor do I need lessons....I find your reply a little insulting.

I simply asked as there are 100’s of posts about nappy horses and riders not.building a bond or trust with their horse.

I just want to start off correctly to prevent any problems
Anyone who says they don't need lessons needs lesson very badly!
 

Cortez

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Anyone who says they don't need lessons needs lesson very badly!
This ^^^ EVERYONE needs lessons, including the top riders in all horse sport. "Bonding" is not something that needs to be created separately, it just happens as part of normal interaction. It is best to treat the horse normally from day one, get on and ride and don't expect there to be a problem. How on earth do you think horses cope with going out to competitions if they have to be treated like china dolls just because they've gone somewhere. Get help, as much as you can: we all do.
 

oldie48

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The last horse I bought was vetted, brought home overnight and then we went off for a five day intensive training course (booked before I knew I'd have a new horse). We both came home completely knackered but we got to know each other pretty quickly. I have never not ridden straight away and I've never led a horse out in hand but I do arrange to hack out in company before I hack out alone (but I'm a wimp). However, the most important thing for me is lessons and getting them out and about confidently. I do try to keep them in the routine/feed they are used to but move them over to what suits me asap.
 

JDH01

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I very much favour the get on and get on with it school of getting used to new horses. I have always hacked out as soon as possible by my self but obviously with phone etc and with others knowing where. I want to do it without the benefit of others advice, to date with 7 previous and my current chap this has always worked. I also think lessons are great for building that bond.
 

Summit

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How on earth will you build this mythical bond by brushing and walking him round like a dog?
Anyone who says they don't need lessons needs lesson very badly!
I can’t believe how rude some replies are... :eek: When I said I didn’t need lessons, it wasn’t meant never do I need them but everyone seems so quick to judge without even asking a few more questions.

Wish I’d never asked now.... I read many posts about new horses and new owners and didn’t once come across replies such as these.

I’m not new to horses and riding, have been doing so for 40 years
 
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Summit

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The last horse I bought was vetted, brought home overnight and then we went off for a five day intensive training course (booked before I knew I'd have a new horse). We both came home completely knackered but we got to know each other pretty quickly. I have never not ridden straight away and I've never led a horse out in hand but I do arrange to hack out in company before I hack out alone (but I'm a wimp). However, the most important thing for me is lessons and getting them out and about confidently. I do try to keep them in the routine/feed they are used to but move them over to what suits me asap.
I very much favour the get on and get on with it school of getting used to new horses. I have always hacked out as soon as possible by my self but obviously with phone etc and with others knowing where. I want to do it without the benefit of others advice, to date with 7 previous and my current chap this has always worked. I also think lessons are great for building that bond.
Thank you for your replies :)
 

JFTDWS

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It's a shame you've taken BP's comment as a personal insult - it's perfectly reasonable advice to give someone who is buying a new horse and asking questions about its management and training that they should invest in some lessons with the horse. We all need guidance, and even the best riders benefit from a good set of eyes on the ground.

FWIW, I entirely agree about riding from day 1, and cracking on. Horses gain most from solid, fair handling and maintenance of their routine or management, particularly if people and places are changing around that. I also think BP and Aus's comments about how you approach this horse's training are important - ride him like a good horse, not the horse you fear he might become. Horses pick up so much from us, even when we're not fully aware of it ourselves.
 

9tails

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I also think BP and Aus's comments about how you approach this horse's training are important - ride him like a good horse, not the horse you fear he might become. Horses pick up so much from us, even when we're not fully aware of it ourselves.
This is so true. I've experienced similar, I bought a horse I knew was good hacking alone so we hacked alone from day one. Then a friend borrowed my horse and couldn't get her off the yard, because she thought she might nap. So she did. I'm convinced they're telepathic.
 

Talism4n

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Absolutely start as you mean to go on from the very beginning, and assume that the horse will go with it. I do the same with green babies and more established horses and it's always worked well. You've said you're concerned about napping - ask yourself why? Whilst a proven hack should be fine to carry on for you, all horses are liable to test you out. If he naps, you deal with it and you carry on. Don't get yourself wound up over something that you can solve, if you're anxious about it then you'll have a much bigger issue than going in feeling confident and capable.
 

gallopingby

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Good luck with your new horse Summit. As others have said best just to get on and get going. I would see if you can find someone with a steady reliable horse to hack out with you for the first few weeks so you can build your confidence together. I don't think spending a few weeks just leading him anywhere is going to get you very far forwards, other than as someone who prefer to just 'play' I'm sure things will be fine once you get going, assuming you've had a fair trial at riding the horse before you've bought him. If he's a retiring TB coming to you straight out of racing he'll be used to going out in a string with others.
 

FestiveFuzz

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I think you got the response you did as despite your many years of experience, your initial post does come across as quite novicey, especially when coupled with your not needing lessons.

As others have said I tend to just start as I mean to go on with a new horse. Generally I try to book a lesson for the day after they arrive so I can get my trainer's input, plus it gives me confidence to have eyes on the ground from someone I trust if I do have any wobbles. After that I just crack on with their intended routine.
 
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