Paralysed Face

wickedwilfred

Well-Known Member
Joined
2 August 2010
Messages
45
I posted a message last summer about my mare who returned from stud with a partially paralysed face - no explanations given but as her normally kind and gentle manner had been replaced by aggression, I was in no doubt that she had been severely traumatised. Although my vet was telling me that if the damage hadn’t repaired withint 6 months it would be permanent, I researched on the internet, put her on high dose Vitamin E for one month and spent the summer (4 months in total) giving her a 10 minute facial massage, acupressure treatments. Now, a year on, her face is back to normal, she had regained the use of her lower lip and her gentle manner has returned. Last month she gave birth to a lovely filly foal. Her condition had slowly improved over the winter months without any extra help from me. So for anyone experiencing this problem with their horse, I say be patient, and it will probably come right in the end, but help it by massaging key facial muscles, which you an easily find on the internet.
 

SpringArising

Well-Known Member
Joined
3 May 2014
Messages
5,256
That's great news. I think I vaguely remember your original post too.

You sound like a lovely caring owner. Your mare's lucky to have you!
 

Zuzzie

Well-Known Member
Joined
27 September 2010
Messages
351
How wonderful that with time and patience you brought your mare back to normality. It must have been distressing and heartbreaking to deal with wondering if she would ever come right. So well done you!

I often resort to doing my own research via google and the internet. Other people have laughed and the vet thinks I'm nuts but I have had the last laugh in the end when I've sorted out issues that they have dismissed out of hand including diagnosing EMS etc.
 

wickedwilfred

Well-Known Member
Joined
2 August 2010
Messages
45
Oh I always query everything. I’m every vet and doctor’s nightmare, but experience has shown that Dr Google invariably pays off whether it be a horse of me. Vets and doctors have to base their diagnoses on clinically proven evidence. My little Welsh Cob who suddenly went down with a vicious attack of laminitis for the first time at the age of 21, I put on an American magnesium/vitamin/herb and supplement recommended by one of the laminitis websites and she is now skipping around and living out on unrestricted grazing again. I’ve had vets and doctors tell me I am wasting my money using osteopaths and my vet burst out laughing when I told her about the Shiatsu massages on my mares face, but the fact is they work. When I mysteriously developed sciatica after a knee op and doctors, physios helped not a bit, I tried Pilates classes and was cured within 2 lessons.
 

Zuzzie

Well-Known Member
Joined
27 September 2010
Messages
351
Oh I always query everything. I’m every vet and doctor’s nightmare, but experience has shown that Dr Google invariably pays off whether it be a horse of me. Vets and doctors have to base their diagnoses on clinically proven evidence. My little Welsh Cob who suddenly went down with a vicious attack of laminitis for the first time at the age of 21, I put on an American magnesium/vitamin/herb and supplement recommended by one of the laminitis websites and she is now skipping around and living out on unrestricted grazing again. I’ve had vets and doctors tell me I am wasting my money using osteopaths and my vet burst out laughing when I told her about the Shiatsu massages on my mares face, but the fact is they work. When I mysteriously developed sciatica after a knee op and doctors, physios helped not a bit, I tried Pilates classes and was cured within 2 lessons.
Yeah, good old Dr Google. Just goes to show that the professionals don't know everything!
 
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