Peripheral hunting stuff ..... all questions, questions..

SueAllen

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How do I best get really severe mud stains off my lovely new black hunting coat? Can I sponge it or just brush like my life depends on it?

How do I cut down the time to clean muddy tack twice a week? Any tips VERY gratefully received!

How do I best get a grey (fleabitten) horse clean? Any products, shampoos, tips also gratefully received! He manages to get bits of himself positively yellow!

And finally, two shopping questions! Where can I find a nice silk stock online (cotton one looks a bit weedy now) and does anyone have ANY idea where I can find a big flask. Not for a big amount of mulled wine/warm port but for lots of warm water so I can wash my ned off with something other than cold. I used to have one that must have held about a gallon but cannot seem to find a replacement anywhere.

Sorry for this. Not strictly hunting posts (I can put it in stable yard if you like) but I guess that I am not alone in having these problems post hunting!? :grin:
 

k9h

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For cleaning coat, when you get back put it on a board & scrub it with a very stiff dandy brush & rain water, then hang to dry & brush again when dry.

When I use to take hot water with me to wash horses off I use to just use ordinary 25 litre drums, then whilst out I would put the thermatex's over them to keep them warm.

Personally I would just get a new cotton stock! But I think most online horse shops will sell a silk one aswell.

Next time buy a dark coloured horse!! Either cover from ear to heels or just keep washing & scrubing!
 

kirstyhen

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Re getting a grey horse clean, i use Champion Tails Restoring Emollient Shampoo in silver highlight, resonable price, VERY thick and purple but after one use pony is VERY white!!! For any greasy or very dirty bits i put on a bit of fairy liuid first.
And i would just wait till mud dries on jacket and brush, that what i do!
Cant help with any other questions though!!
 

SueAllen

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Next time buy a dark coloured horse!!
Believe me, I intend to!!

Going to try the thermatex hot water bottle idea for my plastic jerry can next time - thanks. Sometimes the simplest ideas are the best!
 

k9h

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I use to take 4 drums with me, OK they weren't scorching hot at the end but at least it wasn't cold water & when got home horses were dry & ready to go to bed & not be messed with!
Make sure it is as hot as possible when you fill them!
 

SueAllen

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Also going to put in an order for the CTRES in silver highlight (at the moment Ned is washed with my Tresemme!) OH will think I have lost it if I buy the horse a more expensive shampoo than my own - but what does he know?!

Thanks
 

kirstyhen

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I find it lasts quite a long time as you can dilute it down quite a bit and its still very good, a blob in half a normal size bucket of water will wash two legs!
I wet his legs, put fairy liquid on his hocks and around his feet then scrub with the soapy water and rinse, its fab! I have the cleanest white pony on the yard, and with the least effort!! Trust me, its not down to him being a naturally clean horse!
 

kirstyhen

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Loving the water and thermatex idea! Only prob is mine wheres his to travel and im too poor to afford two! Might just try putting all his other rug over them!
 

SueAllen

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I'm thinking maybe an old duvet could do the same job?! I have dogs and am poor too so am always being offered old duvets for their bedding.....

My Ned has a duvet under his stable rug when it's cold. It's just as well we're not proud! It really works well so even if I had bags of cash I'd probably still use one!
 

kirstyhen

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A women where i used to keep my horses used to get cheap duvets, put chest straps on and sell them to her friends! Worked a treat!
We have lots of vet bed (same reason as you have lots of duvets!) that might work!
 

Maesfen

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Jacket needs to be put on a wooden hanger and to be totally dried before you attack with a brush (a clean dandy brush is great!) After you've brushed it you can get the hoover on it as well; usually brings them up a treat.

If you use a cloth girth (like Cottage Craft used to make?) you can bung that in the machine along with the numnah. If you can have a spare of both, so much the better then they can dry in their own time rather than be forced by central heating/radiators; dry any buckles with a cloth as soon as they're out of the machine.
Leather tack, don't leave until the next day, it looks and feels a lot worse then! Take everything apart, bits, stirrups in the bucket. Use warm water with a spot of washing up liquid and wipe over with a dishcloth (better than a sponge) make sure all buckles are cleaned and check as you go all folding leather and stitching; it soon becomes second nature that as soon as you see tack you start checking it; I still do it and it's 20 years since I did hunters full time!) If it's been a wet day and the tack is wringing anyway, then TBH, I used to dunk it in the bucket and clean off with the cloth; to my mind, if it's wet anyway there's no use trying to keep your cloth as dry as possible! But I would do it a piece at a time and do it as quickly as possible. Once all mud off, hang up to air (but still in pieces) until at least the next day so that it has dried naturally, don't put it by heat. If you possibly can, have a good set and an exercise set of tack (at least bridles if not another saddle) then you only need to polish your tack the night before hunting - and it will last longer too! If I cleaned it all that way (I used to have 14 sets to do by myself each Saturday, 8 sets on the other hunting days!) it would probably take me 15 minutes a set, give or take a few and to put it all up the day before hunting would take about the same so broken down that way it doesn't seem so bad! I'd probably only oil it 2 or 3 times a season too. Sorry, that's gone on so long, are you asleep with boredom yet!?

We used to use Dolly Blue, a laundry liquid cleaner for greys so I suppose you could always bathe him then give him a blue rinse or something! Perhaps there is another laundry cleaner/wash particularly for whites, try your local hardware store (Tesco probably won't have that sort of thing!)

Can't help about stocks but your saddler should be able to help. As to flasks, have you thought about camping/caravanning stores or agricultural merchants (don't know whereabouts you are else might be able to suggest somewhere) Do you not have electric where your horse is otherwise why not try and get a small boiler or a tea urn type thing which would do the trick both for your horse and your tack - and a cup of tea while you do it!? You might find an urn at a second hand shop.

Hope that's helped a bit; you've reminded me how much I miss it! :)
 

SueAllen

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Mine has a single duvet laid over his back, lots showing at the front. Once you put the stable rug on, fold back the duvet, like a big collar and it stays put, no problem. If you have a fidgety/wiggly horse, use a belly strap on the duvet. Works a treat!
 

SueAllen

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Ok, so now I think I will do the dandy brush and rainwater thing first and then try the hoover when dry. Good idea. To be honest, I'll try anything as I treated myself to a really nice jacket recently. It came off Ebay and looked pristine and after my first day out it looked a wreck (but then that's me all over!). I am sure that is down to my cleaning efforts (and the chemicals they have in farmland mud these days?)

Now MFH9 - to your post. I do use cottage craft girths exactly as you describe and it works well. Hubby is a pilot and gets to go to hotels where you get cotton bags with drawstrings for laundry or shoes or something. I get him to bring these back as they are great for containing girths for washing. And help a bit not to bash the machine drum to bits.

I think the thing I have taken from your post is to do clean tack the same day. Damn. But to leave it to dry naturally. Hoorah! Nope I only have the one set - well saddle anyway.

Several people I hunt with have mentioned old style blueing cleaners - Reckitt Blue is one? Bet it is the same as Dolly Blue. Wonder what the active ingredient was? I;ll research and see what the modern equivalent might be.

I've tried all the flask options you mention and no joy. Anglia Farmers here might help but I am still asking around.

Big thanks for all your help.
 

Haniki

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I got a cavalry twill hunt coat as I was worried brushing my melton one seemed to make it lose fluff. I haven't actually worn it yet though.
I can recommend liver chesnut horses as being a very practical colour.
I know what you mean about farm mud - someone I know had a horse that got a mud fever type condition on it's tummy from going through farm slurry one wet winter.
 

SueAllen

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I'llbe looking for a liver chestnut or just something mud coloured next!

As for jackets - eeek! Now you're in a realm I don't understand. Melton v Cavalry - can you expand please?
 

Maesfen

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How sad am I? I've just found my bottle and it's Reckitt's Liquid Blue, made for washing machines - definitely not horses! It's marked up at 10 1/2pence so Lord knows how old it is but it's certainly too old to have the ingredients on it! There used to be a small cube you could get for the rinsing water which you could use many times too, think they called it a dolly bag. We have a very good hardware shop here, I'll see if they still do it for you.

What size bridle do you use, do you have any gadgets too that you need even just for exercise or could you just make do with the head, a bit and some reins to keep your hunting stuff for best? I've got two/three old saddles here if they're any use to you, variations on a medium tree theme; you're welcome to one if it'll be any use just for exercise. You'd be amazed how much easier life is with exercising tack and best tack; it must be why I horde so much of it!!
 

SueAllen

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Dolly bags definitely came up when discussing this subject out hunting (as you do!) not long ago. I think all these proper. 'old fashioned but bloody useful' products are only obtainable through old fashioned hardware shops and chemists.

I have another full size bridle for my boy that I use for everyday hacking and schooling. It's very nice leather, old and in good condition. His hunting bridle is far from top notch but it looks good on him (he has a good strong head) and is kept in good condition.

Thanks for all your offers and advice. You sound just like my current livery yard owner. So very kind and helpful. An absolute mine of information and an education all thrown in!!
I'll dig around and see what I can get together. I should be able to make up a full exercise kit ( I seem to have lots of reins if nothing else?) I must admit that the saddle I have is the best ever for me and the Ned and I would rather keep it clean and well used than try anything else even for exercise.

Thanks for your help. Now I know why I come on here to ask questions! :grin:
 

k9h

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My horses travelled in their thermatexs then they got put over the buckets when taken off the horses. I also had a mobile hose pipe that I could huck up to a spare car battery to rinse them with (much easier than sponge!!) I left it on a yard (slaps wrists) But the inventor use to be a master or member of the atherstone hunt. I have tried for years to remember what it was calle as it was marvelous!!

If anyone knows please let me know!!
 

peakpark

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! There used to be a small cube you could get for the rinsing water which you could use many times too, think they called it a dolly bag. /quote


Have you tried googling these products?
 

Hersom

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I use (i) finger nails and (ii) a scotch pad (one of those green scouring things) to get the lumps of mud off and then brush. Hunt coats are damn tough things. I would suggest that perfection is not desirable since a little residual mud shows you to be a regular....

We take a 10 litre camping water container per horse filled with very hot water and wrapped in a fleece rug to keep it hot. Brilliant - on a good day the horses get washed down and wrapped in their Thermatex rugs before we leave the meet and there's nothing to do back at the yard.
 

JenHunt

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is the jacket a proper thick wool one? if so our hunt staff use a power hose on theirs! i just use a stiff brush on mine.

TACK - i wash off the worst in the stable yard, wipe it over again when i get back to the house and the night before hunting i clean it properly with effax. tack seems like new every saturday morning!

WHITE BITS - use whal diamond white, or cowboy magic shine in yellow out. and also icetight clay helps keep socks white after hunting as well as taking heat out of legs.

FLASK - try tesco. but i reckon youre better off using cold water and a water brush so you dont get mud fever!
 

Eagle_day

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" ..but i reckon you're better off using cold water and a water brush so you don't get mud fever!"

With respect, I do believe it's better not to wash off at all. The old-timers never used to, and there is more mud-fever around these days.
 

JenHunt

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each to their own i guess. I've always had the same routine with cold water after hunting and haven't ever had a horse get mud fever. plus IMO it gives you an earlier opportunity to spot any minor cuts grazes etc that might just need a spot of antiseptic now rather than treatment later. but thats just my opinion. what ever works for you is best i guess. :)
 
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