Pet cow 🐄

paddy555

Well-Known Member
Joined
23 December 2010
Messages
9,370
Cant resist answering - I love my cows , and have 24 , none of which will end at an abbatoir. Essentially they are pets , even though they kind of pay for themselves with a beef calf every year.
I think its quite amusing that some of the disadvantages pointed out - big animals, poach fields , can be dangerous , are equally applicable to horses.
Pictured is 13 yr old View attachment 56731 Beyonce , the most tame cow ever , with grandchildren having turns sitting on her
beautiful cow. So kind.

As for dangerous then I'm not suggesting anyone walk through a field of cows, please don't, but from all the ones I have been around a lot comes down to handling. We have 2 local farmers. Total nightmares, animal welfare non existent. They get the cattle (beef) in by the quad bike, a pack of dogs and they are yelling their heads off before they even open the field gate. The cattle are wild, getting them into the race is a nightmare, cows going mad and struggling in the crush and people get hurt.
We have another couple of farmers, again beef, who walk into the field, no dogs, walk up to the ladies, pat them and ask them politely to shift. The cows slowly get the message and lazily walk through the gate down to the yard. Same sort of breeds just the people who have such different attitudes.

If you relate that to horses then one herd of horses managed in that way would be totally dangerous, the other herd just what we regard as domestic horses because most of us handle them kindly.
 
Joined
21 July 2014
Messages
69
If you were wanting to get some cow experience then there may be someone willing to let you do a bit of farm work in exchange for free labour. I'm thinking routine work like calving, feeding bucket reared calves, helping feed and bed cows or administer wormers etc.

If you can't have the cow(s) you've set your heart on maybe you could purchase some tame ones from a small holder or some baby calves to rear on milk. Have a look on websites such as Sell My Livestock to do research on prices, breeds etc. Otherwise there are plenty textbooks or references online to help you out. One that comes to mind is https://www.fas.scot/downloads/ where you can find a free online Farm Management Handbook that provides costings. It's every farm consultants Bible.

Growing up we'd had a pet Jersey cow. She was truly more reliable than my shetland pony. I could decorate her in daisy chains, and take her for walks.

My current mare loves cows. I have a video of her being bathed (licked) by a heifer and she loved it.

If you can care for a horse, then you can easily handle cattle management. There is books and You Tube. It's just a case of learning new skills.
 

Winters100

Well-Known Member
Joined
18 April 2015
Messages
2,134
We had 2 bullocks when I was growing up and they were sweet. We had not intended to get them but Father won them in a game of poker. I was pretty young, but as I remember they were not a lot of trouble. We had large stables and the 2 of them used to be inside one of them together if it was really foul weather. As I remember they got no hard food, just hay which we made ourselves, so no huge cost. I do hope that you get her and a friend - she sounds sweet:)
 

Mule

Well-Known Member
Joined
27 October 2016
Messages
7,665
Ok I found out she is a Whitehead. I don't know what that is. From what I can figure out on the internet it's a hereford, is that right?
 

Mule

Well-Known Member
Joined
27 October 2016
Messages
7,665
If you were wanting to get some cow experience then there may be someone willing to let you do a bit of farm work in exchange for free labour. I'm thinking routine work like calving, feeding bucket reared calves, helping feed and bed cows or administer wormers etc.

If you can't have the cow(s) you've set your heart on maybe you could purchase some tame ones from a small holder or some baby calves to rear on milk. Have a look on websites such as Sell My Livestock to do research on prices, breeds etc. Otherwise there are plenty textbooks or references online to help you out. One that comes to mind is https://www.fas.scot/downloads/ where you can find a free online Farm Management Handbook that provides costings. It's every farm consultants Bible.

Growing up we'd had a pet Jersey cow. She was truly more reliable than my shetland pony. I could decorate her in daisy chains, and take her for walks.

My current mare loves cows. I have a video of her being bathed (licked) by a heifer and she loved it.

If you can care for a horse, then you can easily handle cattle management. There is books and You Tube. It's just a case of learning new skills.
Good idea, thanks :)
 

Mule

Well-Known Member
Joined
27 October 2016
Messages
7,665
I asked someone in the know who said a Whitehead is a local name for a Hereford. They aren't milked commercially in Ireland so it seems she is destined for the abattoir. I looked up the breed and they were described as docile, which is interesting because these particular cows are far more docile than any horses I've met.
 
Last edited:

hobo

Well-Known Member
Joined
4 March 2010
Messages
8,732
Location
dorset
Black white faced Hereford here in UK worth more than a red white faced Hereford as it means they have may have a bit of Angus as well as holstein about them and people prefered them for beef in my days. I never quite understood why the black whitefaced sold for more in the auction as to me red meant they were nearer to purebred but that was how it used to be.
 
Last edited:

Mule

Well-Known Member
Joined
27 October 2016
Messages
7,665
Black white faced Hereford here in UK worth more than a red white faced Hereford as it means they have may have a bit of Angus as well as holstein about them and people prefered them for beef in my days. I never quite understood why the black whitefaced sold for more in the auction as to me red meant they were nearer to purebred but that was how it used to be.
What size do the crossbreed grow to? Are the hereford smaller or bigger than holstein?
 
Top