Photos of real rolled work, as requested

cremedemonthe

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A few if you wanted to see some photos to my follow up thread of "can you spot fake rolled work"
The first photo if of a dog collar, it's a massed produced and is rolled but not made or used properly in the fact that you can see the stitches still, it's been made by a sewing machine. Not used properly in the fact that the stitches should face towards the animal it's used on, unlike in the photo. The idea is to turn the edges of the leather back over the stitches so you can't see them, it stops them wearing through or rubbing the animal's coat or skin when worn and is the correct way to make and use ROLLED WORK

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This second photo below is a driving bridle throat, I made it by hand and the little ridges you can just see are where the stitching is under the leather. We put the edges of the leather in a rolling block and gently work it in to this shape, the stitches last so much longer, won't rub the animal and this is the correct way to make ROLLED WORK. The customer would be presented with the good smooth side facing out,with no stitches showing or facing them.
When this throat was new, the leather would have been much further down over the stitches to hide the thread more than it is today but this bridle IS 27 years old!
Traditional saddlery is all about safety and presentation, some techniques were developed 200 years ago or more when horses were the main mode of transport. Infact in Victorian times brown Saddlers (term given to men who made gentlemen's riding saddles and bridles) would have had to use white thread so the customer could check your quality of stitching and work made with stitches of up to 16 to the inch not uncommon.
Most bridles now use 8 to the inch and are machined.
How many of you insist on white threads, often 12 or more stitches to the inch and inspect the bridle before you decide to buy it?
Would you know hand stitching from machine stitching?
Food for thought :)

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Lastly, the photo below is of ROUNDED LEATHER BELTING, people use it now for dog collars and leads, because mainly they don't know how to make real rolled work and it's quick, cheap and sells. It is not as strong as rolled work, will break before rolled work does and it tends to stretch where as rolled work doesn't if it's made well enough.I have seen it on bridles which is something I would not do or advise.
You can see the difference in thickness where it's stretched, look at the far left, then the far right, the right is near to the original thickness of when it was made.
It's a slip lead I made for my Lurcher, the main weak link is the binding and underneath are a few stitches but this method of securing a turn of leather round the fitting is not as strong as a turn on rolled work.
I mainly use this ROUND LEATHER BELTING for a belt to run my ancient treadle 45k Singer sewing machine when it's needed.



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Oz
 
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pennyturner

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Lol. Some of my bridles are old enough to have white hand-stitching!
I make a point of repairing like for like, but somehow mine is never quite as neat. :(

Now lets have some pictures of those more unusual articles you were talking about earlier...
 

cremedemonthe

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Lol. Some of my bridles are old enough to have white hand-stitching!
I make a point of repairing like for like, but somehow mine is never quite as neat. :(

Now lets have some pictures of those more unusual articles you were talking about earlier...
I only have one photo and I certainly can't put it on here but I do have a couple of funny stories I can tell you so will PM you, Oz
 

3OldPonies

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Berkshire
Sometimes it is possible to see the marks of the machine foot on some stitched leather work, that gives the game away.

Love that pic of the proper rolled work, that looks so good, it's almost impossible to believe that its 27 years old. Just proves the point, well made goods with quality leather that is looked after will last a lifetime. I wonder how much of what is produced now will get to that age!
 

cremedemonthe

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Was Caterham on the Hill, Surrey now Wales
Sometimes it is possible to see the marks of the machine foot on some stitched leather work, that gives the game away.

Love that pic of the proper rolled work, that looks so good, it's almost impossible to believe that its 27 years old. Just proves the point, well made goods with quality leather that is looked after will last a lifetime. I wonder how much of what is produced now will get to that age!
Not much, machined threads tend to fray, pull out and then run the whole length of the work so you have nothing left holding it together. Once machined threads go that's it you have (or should do) restitch all of it to be sure it is safe. Hand stitching locks the threads together and holds the work. IF a hand stitch goes usually it confines itself to one or two stitches instead of pulling out/running the entire length.
 

Annagain

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10 December 2008
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Fascinating. I remember being taught how to restitch stirrup leathers by my very old school Pony Club instructor who also made all her own bridlework. I haven't done it for a while but I will when I need to. It's so sad how we live in such "buy it cheap and chuck it out" times and don't appreciate and care for real quality.
 
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