Pit Bulls

GSD Woman

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CC I keep seeing a swastika in part of it, farthest from my wrist.
Maybe I'm seeing this because I'm torturing myself by watching today's hearing.
 

GSD Woman

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TheOldTrout, the bite is healing and the antibiotics have made a huge difference. I'm working on not having a panic attack every time a strange dog approaches me.

My niece is back to making excuses for the dog. This is not going to end well. I hope the next person he hurts, well I hope he doesn't hurt anyone else, isn't bitten too badly and for all that is right and honorable, not a child.
 

Clodagh

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What do the animal control check for,GSDW? Just curious.
And would love to know your nieces excuses for him, did you frighten him?
 

GSD Woman

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What do the animal control check for,GSDW? Just curious.
And would love to know your nieces excuses for him, did you frighten him?
Animal Control checks to make sure the rabies certificate is current and to inform the owner that the dog is confined to the property for 10 days post bite. If they owner choses to put the dog down during the quarantine that the head needs to be removed and sent to the state lab for rabies testing.

My niece's excuse is that the pit bull was protecting the other dog. I call bull doody. That h3ll hound wasn't protecting anyone.
 

skinnydipper

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Whose fault is it the dog bit a visitor? Is it the dog's fault?

The dog was sent away for training. The dog has a bite history. Yet he was not restrained or under control when a stranger entered the property.

A dog, whatever the size, history or temperament does not get to decide who is welcome in my home.

My dog is not allowed to go to the door to greet any visitor. Guests are invited in and I bring her through to meet them if they wish. She is on her lead until I am satisfied that everyone (including dog) is comfortable and relaxed.

When we had workmen here she was not allowed access to them.

She is a friendly dog but this is her home/territory. I do not take unnecessary risks.
 
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Ratface

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My German Shepherd was always on a lead, even on our land. At that time, we had a lot of acreage, with public access footpaths criss-crossing it. The only place she wasn't, was in a fenced dog park nearby, with her doggy friends.
GSD was trained to within an inch of her life, was exercised according to her health and ability levels, had hot and cold running dog-sitters who took her out at lunchtime and when I was kept late/overnight at work. She was pts at 13, when her back end began to go.
Dog ownership is a privilege.
I don't know if there is any (lega) way of weeding out unsuitable owners.
 

CorvusCorax

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Whose fault is it the dog bit a visitor? Is it the dog's fault?

The dog was sent away for training. The dog has a bite history. Yet he was not restrained or under control when a stranger entered the property.

A dog, whatever the size, history or temperament does not get to decide who is welcome in my home.

My dog is not allowed to go to the door to greet any visitor. Guests are invited in and I bring her through to meet them if they wish. She is on her lead until I am satisfied that everyone (including dog) is comfortable and relaxed.

When we had workmen here she was not allowed access to them.

She is a friendly dog but this is her home/territory. I do not take unnecessary risks.
This all day but I just leave them in their own space/don't bother with meetings unless it's my Mum or something. Even then everyone just gets hyper cause it's MUMMYYYY....
 

FinnishLapphund

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Glad to hear the antibiotics is working @GSD Woman , hope it heals without leaving a too visible scar.

...
My dog is not allowed to go to the door to greet any visitor. Guests are invited in and I bring her through to meet them if they wish. She is on her lead until I am satisfied that everyone (including dog) is comfortable and relaxed.

When we had workmen here she was not allowed access to them.

She is a friendly dog but this is her home/territory. I do not take unnecessary risks.
For a moment that sounded a bit alien to me, before my memory managed to dig up that I did usually have the Dobermann cross I owned back in the early 90's, on a lead when visitors arrived. But none of my other dogs have cared/does care the same way she did about their home/territory.

With the Spitzes I've owned/owns (Norwegian Buhunds, and Finnish Lapphunds), I would say that their territorial feelings is mostly about alerting about that there is a visitor. Beyond that, a new human, or dog, visitor is just a friend they hadn't/haven't met before.

In general, with my late Smooth Collie and human visitors it was "A visitor, how lovely, mi casa, su casa!" With visiting dogs she really liked some, and with others she was "Meh, I'm going to my Bia bed, wake me up if your human wants to cuddle me."

P.s. only because they're allowed to be near the door it doesn't mean they're allowed to storm out only because I open it.
 

skinnydipper

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For a moment that sounded a bit alien to me, before my memory managed to dig up that I did usually have the Dobermann cross I owned back in the early 90's, on a lead when visitors arrived. But none of my other dogs have cared/does care the same way she did about their home/territory.

With the Spitzes I've owned/owns (Norwegian Buhunds, and Finnish Lapphunds), I would say that their territorial feelings is mostly about alerting about that there is a visitor. Beyond that, a new human, or dog, visitor is just a friend they hadn't/haven't met before.

In general, with my late Smooth Collie and human visitors it was "A visitor, how lovely, mi casa, su casa!" With visiting dogs she really liked some, and with others she was "Meh, I'm going to my Bia bed, wake me up if your human wants to cuddle me."
The owner letting a large, powerful dog make his own decisions didn't seem to work out too well for GSD Woman.

My dog is a mastiff.
 

Pinkvboots

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I hope your feeling better today and your would is healing well that looks nasty.

I had a Pitt bull years ago rescued him as a pup from an unwanted litter, I lived on my own in a flat at the time he was walked regularly but I never let him off the lead I never quite trusted him with other dogs.

One night when he was just over a year old I had some friends come over and I really didn't like the way he behaved when they came in, he lunged at one of them and was so excited so I put him in the kitchen I then let him out as he had calmed down, he happily layer down and was calm while we all sat chatting.

When they got up to leave he did it again and was growling like he was trying to stop them leave, he did this a few times with various people so I always shut him away when I had visitors I just couldn't trust him.

I did end up rehoming him to a friend of mine who had had pit bulls before and he was well used to them, I totally disclosed what he did and I pkept in touch with him for some years and he didn't have any issues with the dog.

I just felt out of my depth with him I was only young about 19 and didn't really have the knowledge and it just worried me so I think it was the best option for both of us really.
 

Supertrooper

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My niece had adopted a pit bull from a local shelter. She was told the dog was good with cats. He wasn't. They should have returned him then.

I went to bring her stuff and for her fiancé to look at my car windshield wipers. We went in through the back gate and she said the dogs will bark and then sniff me. I've met the lab mix many times with no trouble. The pit bull sniffed, took a step or two backwards and launched at me. He tried for my gut first, thank whatever gods there might be that he didn't connect. Then he went for my face. I felt his muzzle hit my face. I think that's when I must have thrown up my arm. He latched onto my arm. It's pretty nasty. My niece managed to get him off of me. I swore at her and told her she needed to put the dog down.

Just from things she has said I didn't think this dog belonged in a home. Now I'm convinced of it. Last night my sister went upstairs to tell her he needed to go back to the shelter. I believe at this point he would be euthanized. I also think they would be taking the coward's way out. Niece has been stressed and depressed and said the dog has been the only thing keeping her going for the last 7 months. She has been under a lot of poop from her job. I do wish I could swear like I have been about this whole thing.

They now realize that the dog needs to be in a crate or on a leash when people come over. Niece also bought a muzzle. I just keep thinking that denial is more than a river in Egypt.

I did tell my niece that I wouldn't report the dog. She realizes that if he bites another person he has to go visit doggy Jesus.

Oh and after he bit me she told me that he "snapped" at a friend of boyfriend. A snap that broke skin because friend who had met the dog bent over the dog to pet him. SMDH.

Thank you for letting me get this all out.
Is this in UK, Pit Bull types can not be rehomed in UK

Sorry to hear of your bite, looks very nasty and really hope you’ve had it properly treated

Your niece is very much at risk of at some point getting a police visit if either they see the dog ie whilst out walking and suspect it’s of type or of course if it bites someone else

Not had chance to read other responses
 

Clodagh

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Is this in UK, Pit Bull types can not be rehomed in UK

Sorry to hear of your bite, looks very nasty and really hope you’ve had it properly treated

Your niece is very much at risk of at some point getting a police visit if either they see the dog ie whilst out walking and suspect it’s of type or of course if it bites someone else

Not had chance to read other responses
In the US
 

SilverLinings

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One of my dogs is a Shitsu. He’s also not allowed to greet anyone at the door as he can be a nasty bugger.
That sounds like exactly what any responsible dog owner should do, as it keeps humans/other dogs safe but also protects your own dog from potentially needing to be destroyed if they attack someone.

I have met a couple of owners of aggressive (either to people, other animals or both) small dogs over the years who have told me not to worry as they couldn't do any real damage as they only have small teeth. They seem to think it's fine to allow their dog to attack because of it's size, despite the fact that a) my dogs weren't a lot bigger (in cases where it was them that it was going for) and b) I don't particularly want to be bitten by a dog of any size, thanks. Unfortunately there appears to be quite a few small dog owners around (particularly of 'fashionable' breeds like frenchies, chihuahuas and pomeranians) who think that their dog couldn't kill a human so they don't need to do any training or manage it's behaviour/stress.

Sorry OP for the slight diversion! I hope that your bite wound is starting to heal ok, I am glad that you have ABs to take.
 

FinnishLapphund

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The owner letting a large, powerful dog make his own decisions didn't seem to work out too well for GSD Woman.

My dog is a mastiff.
I never said it worked out well for GSD Woman. You said what you do that works for you and your dog, and I in a somewhat lengthy way said it felt odd hearing about that because I haven't had a dog where I had to do such things since around 30 years ago/the early 90's.
 

GSD Woman

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I had been having panic attacks around strange dogs. I stewarded at my club's obedience trial today. That is probably the best thing I could have done for myself. It was a bit of a flooding. Eventually the panic subsided to just a little quickening of my heart rate.

Any of the club members who heard about were shocked that niece isn't putting the dog down. they all recognize what a danger this dog is but my niece still can't see it. In book learning she is one of the smartest people I've ever met. Dog realities not so much.
 
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