point and balance straps

Cassy

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Is it worth having the above fitted to my GFS saddle? I have real problems with saddle slipping to the right. I use one of the best anti slip pads but still struggling to keep level. I do tip slightly to the right but my roly poly flat back mare really throws the saddle at all paces.
 

FfionWinnie

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If the saddle doesn't fit and you strap it down in this manner, it's really uncomfortable for the horse. I would look at other options, if she's fat, slim her down, if the saddle isn't a good fit, get a different one. You might find you need to find the right fitter as well.
 

Shay

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Better for the horse to get a saddle that fits properly and to deal with your own straightness issues I'm afraid. Adding extra straps is just going to transfer all that uneven pressure to the animal's back.

There is a purpose to point straps - we had one for a while on the cob's saddle because the combination of an unlevel pelvis from a fracture as a weanling (carefully managed - horse is pain free) and a very light child rider threw the saddle off slightly. But it was removed as soon as the rider gained enough heft. The saddle was made on him (largely because of the pelvis issues) and was checked every 6 months.

If your current saddler has recommended a point strap as a first option it might be worth looking for a second opinion.
 

sbloom

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A point strap on the wrong saddle will pull the front of the saddle down, you may find a flatter tree is a better way to go, but definitely get yourself and the horse checked. Four girth straps should be provided on most cob style saddles to give you options, using the point strap on both sides and the balance strap on one side (the side the saddle slips away from) and other asymmetric girthing options can be very useful but ultimately a better fit should mean more stability.
 

Cassy

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Thanks for your replies. I have had the saddle checked and it fits ok. I do have a slight scoliosis of the spine and not sure that can be fixed. Maybe its time to hang up the boots and take up knitting!!
 

Goldenstar

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Not wanting to worry you OP but horses carrying a lameness behind ( often in the the hock ) tend to shift their saddles over .
 

Bosworth

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i would first look at your horse shape, a larger shoulder will shift the saddle across to the opposite side, so check you are not putting it on too far forward. Make sure it sits behind the left shoulder if it is going right. Check your girth, one with elastic will not help you at all, try looking at the Stubben Trevira girths, they are great for chunky horses as they help spread the saddle across the greatest width and stabilise the saddle. Check your stirrups, it is highly likely if you are one sided that you have stretched your stirrup leathers on the one side and although they are on the same hole, one is longer. Check the saddle is not actually too wide. so many saddle fitters have no idea how to fit a saddle to a very wide horse. The tree needs to be keyholed in shape, not just wide. And check once it is in the correct place that it is sitting square. If all that is correct, then you need to really look how you sit, close your eyes and feel if you are level. Try an alexander technique trainer. that can help a lot.
 
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