Puncture through tendon sheath at fetlock

scruffyponies

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My poor pony has hurt himself really quite badly. The puncture is fairly large, so draining well at present. Has been flushed, antibiotics, pain killers etc.
I am aware that this is life-threatening. Vet is to reassess after the weekend.

I have no experience with an injury like this, so assuming he isn't condemned outright; any tips for nursing / rehab care?
Has anyone else's pony/horse come through a similar injury without weeks in EH?
 

scruffyponies

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Fingers crossed for a straight forward recovery.
Any idea how he managed it?
Not entirely sure. It's not an over-reach or shoe-related (all are unshod). It looks like he got his foot caught in something. Of course by the time we found him he was free, and I suspect we'll never know exactly.
 

Elf On A Shelf

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What drugs is he on? You want him on strong anti-biotics for a start. I would try to avoid excess bute if any at all - you need to see how sound he is. So long as he stays sound you should be ok. If he goes lame an infection has got in and that's not good. I assume he is bandaged?
 

StowfordPress

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Mine had a similar injury, I don’t remember much As it was 4 years ago but can say she recovered really well and hasn’t had an issue with it since. Fingers crossed this will be the case for yours too :)
 

scruffyponies

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He had an antibiotic jab initially. I have to get a liquid oral one down him now.
He is on Bute to get the inflammation down, but we'll stop it after about 5 days... assuming we get that far.
He is bandaged. I had to travel him about 5 miles to get him home to a stable, which was a worry, but he loaded willingly, travelled quietly, and seems settled nicely in the stable. (he hasn't bee in since he was a foal).
 

Elf On A Shelf

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I would defos keep him in and only walk him out quietly round the yard a couple of times at either end of the day to make sure he is still sound. That's the key. If he goes lame get the vet back out, it may require flushing again which can hopefully be done at home.

In the long term he will be absolutely fine if everything goes as it should.
 

scruffyponies

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I would defos keep him in and only walk him out quietly round the yard a couple of times at either end of the day to make sure he is still sound. That's the key. If he goes lame get the vet back out, it may require flushing again which can hopefully be done at home.

In the long term he will be absolutely fine if everything goes as it should.
Thank you.
 

ycbm

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Fingers all crossed for you here. I have known of several cases, most of which survived and were fine.

.
 

MissTyc

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Mine did this in the field - left hind fetlock, right through tendon sheath and joint (Eeek!). We were told to prepare for the worst because of infection risk. When she survived the GA/flush/etc, she was very lame and had to have surgery to the tendon sheath. She made it through that and had to go on box rest for a few months for the joint. She then got a stress injury on the opposing hock and had surgery on that. Made it. More box rest .... After 4 months box rest with regular assessments and the usual adequan, etc, she went into a roundpen for a few months. Very wobbly on the hind left and we were told she was "mechanically lame" due to the shortening of tendons or ligaments or something or other ... Told only good for field, maybe hacking. 2 years later, she was competing at novice and jumping 90cm no both. Definitely moves a bit weird, but not enough to get the dressage judge out of the car.

With the joint involved, I can say that the tendon sheath was the least of our worries at the time!

Good vibes for your horse! They can be surprisingly resilient <3
 

TheHairyOne

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There was a horse on our yard that ended up with an infection after puncturing the tendon sheath last year. She is now 100% sound and been given the all clear to crack on as she was!

Hope your horse is ok.
 
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