Rescue Center's too stringent rehoming process??

lula

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Anyone read the Daily Maul today?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2081502/Stray-dogs-There-345-day-hard-dog-loving-home.html


i dont know which Rescue Center this article refers to but i doubt id be too happy either if a Home Visit check was accompanied by a dog that peed all over my hall carpet..
and i didnt know rescues centers kept dogs microchipped to them on adoption- is this right?

Are adoption processses too stringent in rescue centers..or do they have to be?

thoughts ladies/gents?
 
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CorvusCorax

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Brilliant way to drive people into the welcoming arms of puppy farmers, don't know why I am surprised, this is the same paper blaming the police for the tragic deaths of three women killed by a nutjob, not the actual nutjob who pulled the trigger.

Yes, some rescues have stringent policies but they are damned if they do and damned if they don't, there's another post on here where people are wondering why a rescue released a dog into the home they did, because it hasn't worked out, and should more checks not have taken place.

The article lost any credibility with the line: "I’m quite convinced Madonna had an easier time adopting David and Mercy from Malawi than we did our two puppies."
What utter, utter, appalling tripe.

Dogs sometimes pee on carpets, it's part of dog ownership, the rescue pups have probably peed on the carpet many times over since then.

We have waited months and years for the right dog to come along in the past, if people want something cute and furry RIGHT THIS VERY MOMENT, they should go and buy a teddy bear.
 

Spudlet

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Firstly, my experience of rehoming was nothing like that at all! Henry is microchipped to me, and the process was nowhere near that either.

Secondly, 'we're clearly a nice middle-class family...' - BS, sorry but that's no guarantee of a good home at all and frankly that statement annoys me greatly! Having money does not mean you will give a good home. And nor does a lack of money mean you will give a bad home. I mean, honestly!

Thirdly, let's hope this doesn't put people off rehoming - but then what do you expect from the Daily Fail. Basically, this woman has had a bad experience (ETA for bad experience read 'she didn't get exactly what she wanted when she wanted it, and stomping her well-shod little middle-class feet didn't work either, how utterly dreadful for her, anyone would think she was common or something') and so she's going to get paid to write all about with pictures of her 'lovely home', and a nice bit of generalisation about the breeds nobody wants - I suppose they aren't 'middle-class' enough for her...:rolleyes:
 
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lexiedhb

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What Spud said- Dex is microchipped to me. Yes home checks are vitally important IMO- massive high energy dog in tiny flat with no garden simply would not work.

Dogs are messy buggers, if one bit of pee on a carpet makes people who want to own them that annoyed then maybe a Teddy would be a better option!
 

Spudlet

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Lovely thanks CC:) You?

I do like how she basically says they decided to rescue because puppies were too expensive as well.... you wouldn't think that would be an issue for such a nice middle class person ;) :rolleyes:
 

s4sugar

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Brilliant way to drive people into the welcoming arms of puppy farmers, don't know why I am surprised, this is the same paper blaming the police for the tragic deaths of three women killed by a nutjob, not the actual nutjob who pulled the trigger.

Yes, some rescues have stringent policies but they are damned if they do and damned if they don't, there's another post on here where people are wondering why a rescue released a dog into the home they did, because it hasn't worked out, and should more checks not have taken place.

The article lost any credibility with the line: "I’m quite convinced Madonna had an easier time adopting David and Mercy from Malawi than we did our two puppies."
What utter, utter, appalling tripe.

Dogs sometimes pee on carpets, it's part of dog ownership, the rescue pups have probably peed on the carpet many times over since then.

We have waited months and years for the right dog to come along in the past, if people want something cute and furry RIGHT THIS VERY MOMENT, they should go and buy a teddy bear.
H&H needs a like button!
 

galaxy

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I do agree that some requirements are ridiculous like young children, work full time or for exampple the man who owns the yard I'm at was declined because his 32 acres was not surrounded by a 6ft fence!!

But I do think the home checks etc are necessary, why should they take your word that you are a nice middle class family? The woman already admitted that she lied about her toddler!! And now she has publised this in a NATIONAL newpaper along with photos how long till the resuce centre find out and remove the dogs?? Not very well thought through I'd say!!

I do find people who work in some rescue centres can be very "superior" and they should be more welcoming and accomodation. Something needs to change to help these dogs get into family homes.
 

madeleine1

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Hell. Really? HELL?!!!!!

Get a bit of perspective. Losing a loved one, etc, is hell, filling in some forms and not getting exactly what you want, when you want it, is not hell.
i may have used it a bit freely in some peoples opinions but yes it is hellish as we loose the loved family dog and want to replace it with a dog that needs help and a loving home. we can take a dog with issues as we have 7 acres and experience and no kids and people always on site. so we can take most dogs. but we are not allowed to help and are left feeling horendous at not taking one of the dogs that needs a home because we have no fenced in area and the dog lives outside in a barn for 6 or 7 hours a night and with heating god for bid.

so yes i find the whole thing awful

i do think they need to do checks and i have donated my time and money to homes in the past but sometimes its to much
 

Jake10

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We had a very easy time getting two dogs from a rescue - Went to see dogs - applied to adopt the two we liked - discussed the dogs and our situation with the staff - interacted with the dogs out of the kennel - more talking/reading previous owners statement about the dogs - home check - collected dogs.

The problem I've had with rescues are their assessments of the dogs in their care. We adopted two 4 year olds that were good with cats, young children and small furies. In fact the only problem with the dogs was that they pulled on the lead. Lets just say that both dogs were unsuitable for a life where contact with young children, small furies and cats were a daily occurrence.

I would get a rescue dog again but only from a small rescue (the dog we got from a small local rescue was exactly as described and an absolute joy to have :D ). No more big name rescues for me.
 

CorvusCorax

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Maybe, having slagged off the charity, the homecheck, several breeds of dog and got her name, opinion and mug to a nice big wide audience, who may or may not ever darken the door of a rescue centre because of her words, she will donate her fee for that piece to a dog rehoming charity :) :) :)
 

paulineh

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I have read this piece and would be very angry if they came into my house and opened cupboards also allowing a dog to foul in the house. Puppy's do have accidents but they are your dogs

I have had Springers for over 40 years and of those years I have had 4 rescue ones. One of my current dogs is a rescue one and my next would also be from Springer Spaniel Rescue or such.

I think it depends on the people and the centers. So far I have never had a homecheck, they have contacted my vet etc and that has been fine.

I believe that some centers are far too stringent. I have horses and other dogs plus I am retired, have a secure garden, the dogs live out (At Night) plus they get free access to my fields when I am with the horses again they will get at least 2 x 1hrs run in the woods. Do you think I would be turned down.
 

s4sugar

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Maybe, having slagged off the charity, the homecheck, several breeds of dog and got her name, opinion and mug to a nice big wide audience, who may or may not ever darken the door of a rescue centre because of her words, she will donate her fee for that piece to a dog rehoming charity :) :) :)
Or spend it on legal fees when the charity reclaims the dogs?
 

ladyt25

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Haven't read the article but I do think it can be frustrating when rescues appear to be almost putting you off adopting some dogs. However, having just got mine from a large rescue (Dogs Trust) I appreciate why they do air on the side of caution as it must be so frustrating for them when dogs they adopted out to a seemingly understanding, loving, knowledgeable home are then returned to them (often with more behaviour/anxiety problems making them even harder to rehome!)

I did not find it hard to adopt mine at all really, they discussed her in quite a bit of detail (as much as they knew having only had her in two weeks anyway), wanted to check we were ok and could cope with her behaviour issues and they did actually do a homecheck (first time we've ever had one) but that was because they wanted to see if she would be ok with my guinea pigs!

I did not find it stressful or hard work, I don't expect to go along and pick up a dog on a whim from a rescue as I am pretty sure they get tonnes who decide one day they quite fancy a dog yet when reality hits, said dog comes back to the centre!

It does give me peace of mind as well that should the worst happen, my dog will always be 'owned' by the Dogs Trust and they would rehome her if needs be. Ok, so I, my parents and my sisters would have to have probably popped our clogs before that happens but the security of that is still there.
 

Dobiegirl

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I think rescues requiring people to visit 3 times to bond is totally over the top, what is lacking in both parties is basic common sense.

When I had a home visit prior to adopting she recommended putting a sign on the gate and having walked around the garden said in her experience if a dog wanted to get out it would. In the house she just asked where the dogs would sleep and what rooms would they be allowed to go into. I found her extremely friendly and open and we even exchange Xmas cards. If she had started to open cupboards I would have told her to p**s off for being so intrusive.

I had talked to Dobermann Welfare several times about my experience with the breed and they had several dogs which was suitable. As I initially wanted 1 dog and would later stagger another in they suggested Diesel & Darcy who were siblings and 18months old. So on my only visit I left with Diesel & Darcy, whilst having siblings is not recommended it has worked very well and are 2 happy healthy dogs.

I understand rescues have to be careful as they dont want dogs being returned and also the logic of not rehoming a puppy with a toddler because puppies when teething test everything with their teeth . Why cant rescues make an adopter sign something with a disclaimer if the puppy nips the toddler. As I get older it seems to me the general public have very little understanding of dogs and the rescue centres have to allow for this but as I said basic common sense is sadly lacking even in middle class people.:rolleyes::D
 

blackcob

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I too think they are damned if they do, damned if they don't. I was turned away at the first phonecall for not having a garden - frustrating, yes, understandable, yes.

Two friends of ours got a GSD bitch from Dogs Trust just weeks after moving into their first home together - tiny new build house, had a fenced garden but nowhere I'd personally want to walk a dog, any real countryside would have involved a car journey. The dog had terrible SA, destroyed the house while they were out and two weeks in nailed the girl's dad when he came round to visit, biting him badly on the arm. They had to give the dog back.

Goes to show that rehoming dogs cannot be reduced to a box-ticking exercise, they met all of the criteria but in reality they were absolutely not ready for a dog and that dog was totally unsuitable for them.

This brings up one of my other issues with kennel-based rescue centres - I don't believe they can fully assess how a dog will behave in a standard home environment (especially in terms of SA, which has got to be one of the major factors in dogs being given up) and for that reason I will continue to adopt from rescues where dogs are fostered in the home by volunteers.

I would also go mental if a home checker started opening my cupboards. :eek: Mine was only in the house for five minutes, due to the lack of garden she bought her dogs and we went for a walk instead. She only wanted to know how often we walked and how long I was likely to leave the dogs for (would normally have been grilled on breed-specific issues but I already had one).

Also in regards to the article, I can understand the rescue's reticence in rehoming what is essentially an adolescent Eurohound to a family with young children, not because the dog is likely to eat the kids but because they need such a great deal of exercise that it is likely to be incompatible with family life.
 

lexiedhb

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This brings up one of my other issues with kennel-based rescue centres - I don't believe they can fully assess how a dog will behave in a standard home environment (especially in terms of SA, which has got to be one of the major factors in dogs being given up) and for that reason I will continue to adopt from rescues where dogs are fostered in the home by volunteers.
This is so so so true, many behaviours are not shown in the kennel environment. Sadly there are not enough foster homes for the amount of dogs rescues are taking in.
 

blackcob

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Don't I know it, SHWA keep badgering me about whether I can take in a foster, I'd love to but OH has categorically stated that he will leave me if he comes home to find another dog in the house. :eek: It's on the cards for when we have a garden though. :)
 

Cop-Pop

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Its been well documented on here that *some* rescue centres are hard to deal with. My own experiences when my parents were looking for a dog were awful - some were lovely but they didnt have suitable dogs at the time, others were patronising, rude and in some cases downright nasty.

If you read the article she states she doesn't mind the homecheck etc just the other possibly uneeded hoops to be jumped through. When my mum rang one rescue she was asked for a medical reference - she was 65 at the time. Another rescue wanted every member of the family who may visit the house to visit the dog including people who only visit occasionally. There is no way they could have got various grandchildren 40 miles to visit a dog. The last one she rang before Sandy arrived ripped shreds off her because their last dog was pts.

Personally I think its about time rescues got together and realised that the welfare of the dog is more important than their ideals. They preach about no dog being perfect but no home is perfect either.
 

lexiedhb

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Don't I know it, SHWA keep badgering me about whether I can take in a foster, I'd love to but OH has categorically stated that he will leave me if he comes home to find another dog in the house. :eek: It's on the cards for when we have a garden though. :)
LOL the girl who used to walk Dex when he was in kennels keeps asking when i have time off, and would dex maybe like a playmate...... :rolleyes:
 

piebaldsparkle

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LOL when my sister went to adopt a cat she had only two criteria, it must be black & white (old cat was black/white and No.1 daughter was desperate for another b/w one) and it couldn't be too timid (two preschool girls don't make for a quiet household). She was shown 2 both hid at the back of their cages and one of them had multiple health issues.

No.1 daughter fell for another cat that they weren't being shown who was at the front of her cage and appeared quite bold. However when my sister asked about her she was told they weren't sure what she was like with children and couldn't guarantee she wouldn't scratch!! Think they were a bit taken back, when my sister replied that well if she scratches them, they will learn to give the cat space!;) Turned out Finny had been there a while and returned twice! as she nibbles your hand, not hard bites, but nibbles and is totally in your face!

One look of my sister and No.1 daughter in the cage with Finny convinced the rescue, that her issues would not be a problem! Anyway Finny has been with them for nearly a year now and both girls love her to pieces.
 
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EAST KENT

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It`s a difficult one this,while all rescues want their dogs out and into homes..at the same time it needs to be a stable forever one.Does anyone actually consider the damage done to a dog`s mind each time it has to change it`s home?I think they must be no different to a two year old child,and shunting a child around does immense damage.
One of my bull terrier welfare`s was so badly damaged by their last attempt at rehoming her,that she lives here,being too unstable to rehome.She is a feisty intelligent dog,and the last home`s answer to his inability to cope was to beat the **** out of her,including when she was caged in the house.Result? Guards spaces unpredictably.Obviously that charity is not nearly careful enough..so there are two sides to everything.Anyway,the journalist prob got thousands for that article..so she`s happy!
 

PolarSkye

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That article made my blood boil and I actually took the time to post a reply. Our shelter actually found Daisy for us . . . to order, so to speak . . . already knowing us as adopters (Daisy is the third dog we have adopted from them) and our current dog's specific needs and quirks. Shelters are damned if they do/damned if they don't . . . they have a duty to find good, solid homes for these dogs . . . but how do they do that in a relatively short space of time? Yes, they need to do home checks . . . but what boxes should they be ticking given that they will have a variety of dogs for rehoming? Some shelters will take a more stringent, catch-all stance and eliminate anyone who works/has young children/moves alot . . . others will take a more bespoke approach and take their time to find a good match.

When we adopted our first dog from the above-referenced shelter, they took a pragmatic approach - one of the volunteers was our neighbour and knew us as a family, had been to our home and so waived the home visit.

All of the above said, we were dealing with a (relatively) small local shelter . . . I've not experienced the rigours of one of the larger, national organizations and may indeed have found them onerous . . . but we're talking about a living, breathing, sentient being here - not a lawn mower or a bicycle. Dogs live for a long time . . . I think it's just plain common sense (not to mention humane) for shelters to try and make sure their dogs go to the best possible home.

And don't get me started on bringing puppies (especially rescue pups) into homes with toddlers. Grrrrrrrrrr.

P
 

Hedwards

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I too found the article thoroughly annoying, and she has tarred all rescues with the same brush. Maybe visiting 3 times was a little OTT, but if you are really serious about adopting it really shouldnt matter, and I would have been pretty annoyed about the peeing on the carpet (not so much the peeing, but the fact they didnt offer to help clean up). However having had Suzy from GRWE earlier this year, the whole process couldnt have been nicer!

I now volunteer for the rescue and do home checks & soon to help with 'home liaison'. I personally believe the home check part is essential, anyone can say how lovely their home is, but sadly too many people are conservative with the truth!

Oh well, I just hope the rescue dont take offence and follow up on their contract and remove the dogs from her home, they are obviously loved and would just be taking up 2 more spaces in kennels.
 

Spudlet

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I got Hen from the Dogs Trust. I went to the centre three times to walk him, which they required - fair enough IMO, it seems like a good idea so he was at least a little familiar with me when the time came for him to come home with me. I lived alone at the time with no other pets - if I hadn't lived alone the family would have needed to meet him too. Fair enough again IMO, everyone in the house needs to be committed to having a dog. They did a home visit, and the lady looked around the downstairs, the backyard to check it was secure, and the landing as at the time that's where I though he would be sleeping. I also needed written permission from my landlord to say I could have him, and on the day I picked him up I, along with all the other people picking dogs up, had to have a brief talk on settling them in. I had to say which vet I would be using and fill in a couple of forms. They knew I work, but also knew he would come to work with me which they were fine with as they knew Henry would love meeting all the new people. In all, the process took less than a week (although I had to wait to collect him until after Christmas) and it cost me all of £90. He came with a collar, lead and a bag of food, and I've had free advice and a one to one from their behaviourist when I was having issues with his recall.

I honestly don't see any of that as unreasonable...?
 

Archangel

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Totally random but why is she wearing blue dress *shudders* with grey tights/tan boots (clean) in one picture and blue tights no tan boots in another - is it a middle class thing?

Also, whilst having sympathy for her during what seems to have been a tedious adoption process, all sympathy evaporated pretty quickly when she lied to them about having a toddler. She wasn't 'a bit naughty' as she says in the article, she deliberately misled the rescue over something as fundamental as a toddler coming into contact with the dogs. To my mind it is irresponsible. Lie about having a five foot fence when in fact it is only 3ft 6ins but to lie about a toddler? Also it implies that she put her own knowledge of how a puppy would behave (based on her own extensive experience of owning 1 labrador) over a rescue centre who handle goodness knows how many dogs of varying temperaments every day. Furthermore she continued with the lie and hid all evidence of the toddler from the home checker. Smashing dogs though.
 
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