Riding

Jcmc

New Member
Joined
23 February 2019
Messages
5
When I was younger, I used to ride but I had to stop before I could canter because my parents couldn’t afford to pay for the lessons. I then restarted lessons in 2017 and had to stop again before I could canter because the stable shut down.

I then started helping out at another stable in October but stopped because I was working from 9 to 4 but I wasn’t really getting anything out of it.

I want to start riding again because I loved being around horses and I want to own some when I finish my education (I’m 15 at the moment) but the stables that offer lessons closest to me, the one I help out at, the prices are too expensive and I can’t afford it.

I’m just wondering whether any of you have any advice on what I should do and how I can start riding again. Ideally, I want to start riding again in the summer because I have 12 weeks holiday due to me finishing my GCSEs in June

Thanks
 

Jcmc

New Member
Joined
23 February 2019
Messages
5
You could ask to work in exchange for lessons. I don't know if that's still done these days but it's no harm to ask.
One of the people who work at the stable said that they don’t offer discounts for lessons, otherwise I would be doing that. Even my parents suggested that because that’s one of the main reasons why I decided to start helping out.
 

joosie

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Joined
24 June 2009
Messages
897
Location
Normandy, France
Horse-riding is definitely expensive! I managed to beg / borrow / steal the odd ride here and there on friends' horses and occasionally save up the money from my Saturday job to book a hack at the local stables, but I actually couldn't afford to ride regularly or learn properly until I was an adult with a full-time job.
You said you stopped helping out at the stables because you "got nothing out of it", but then you said you love being around horses. So it sounds like the actual riding is the most important thing for you? (There is nothing wrong with that by the way!) You are old enough to get a part-time job at the weekends so maybe that will help you pay for lessons.
 

Red-1

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Joined
7 February 2013
Messages
7,744
Location
Yorkshire
I would get a job, I did a few teenager jobs to earn extra money. They were non horse jobs, but great in that they gave me what I wanted.

Could you help out at your local RDA (Riding for the Disabled)? Many people get a 'horse fix' and learn basic horse handling, some places you would also get a ride, but that is not everywhere and to be fair the horses are already hard working in most centres. If you are going GCSEs this year you will also be looking, presumably, to enhance your future CV for either Uni or work, and charity work will do this too.

Are there any horse charities near you? One local to us had kids/teens go and volunteer for the stable jobs and in return would get the odd ride. It would be the odd ride though, as most horses there were old or infirm.

What are your aspirations? If you do well in GCSEs then this is probably not appropriate for your future wealth, but our local college does equine courses. They will take beginners and people who have not passed English/Maths. They do a NVQ1 in year 1 and NVQ2 in year 2. I am unsure how they make the course last that long, but they do regular riding lessons, have a massive indoor school, well qualified instructors, have outdoor arenas too, and it is counted as full time education, so if you had not planned on further academic qualifications then this could be an option. I don't think it is as likely as some options to lead to future employment though.
 

Jcmc

New Member
Joined
23 February 2019
Messages
5
I would get a job, I did a few teenager jobs to earn extra money. They were non horse jobs, but great in that they gave me what I wanted.

Could you help out at your local RDA (Riding for the Disabled)? Many people get a 'horse fix' and learn basic horse handling, some places you would also get a ride, but that is not everywhere and to be fair the horses are already hard working in most centres. If you are going GCSEs this year you will also be looking, presumably, to enhance your future CV for either Uni or work, and charity work will do this too.

Are there any horse charities near you? One local to us had kids/teens go and volunteer for the stable jobs and in return would get the odd ride. It would be the odd ride though, as most horses there were old or infirm.

What are your aspirations? If you do well in GCSEs then this is probably not appropriate for your future wealth, but our local college does equine courses. They will take beginners and people who have not passed English/Maths. They do a NVQ1 in year 1 and NVQ2 in year 2. I am unsure how they make the course last that long, but they do regular riding lessons, have a massive indoor school, well qualified instructors, have outdoor arenas too, and it is counted as full time education, so if you had not planned on further academic qualifications then this could be an option. I don't think it is as likely as some options to lead to future employment though.
Well I’ve applied to Myerscough college to see about the city and guilds in forgework so that I can start the farriery apprentiship but if I don’t get a place I’ll be doing a levels and potentially going to uni and doing the veterinary medicine course
 

Shay

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Joined
17 August 2008
Messages
6,368
You are under age so don't post where you live - but I am very surprised there are no horse charities at all. RDA are the great catch all, but don't overlook rescue centers, inner city riding schools and pony club centers. But I do accept as not yet being able to drive you are going to be restricted to what you can reach on foot or by bike.
 

Ambers Echo

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Joined
13 October 2017
Messages
2,812
I agree with the advice to get a job away from horses to pay for lessons. Even if your YO pays you for the 9-4 you are likely to earn more in a different area. So unless you love the stable work (but it does not sound like you do) then you'd be better off focusing on earning money and not on finding a horse-related job.
 

Keith_Beef

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Joined
8 December 2017
Messages
2,371
Location
Seine et Oise, France
Definitely agree with those above: find some way of earning money to pay for lessons. My little brother worked from being 16 as a glass collector in bars and pubs, and then worked behind the bar when he reached 18.

If you think you might go into farriery, there is the whole field of decorative ironwork to look at as well. If you can set up a small workshop, you can make things and sell them on Etsy or some other marketplace.

And don't feel discouraged that you haven't got up to cantering, yet. I only rode very occasionally as a teenager, never had any lessons at all, and found trotting much, much more difficult than cantering.
 

Mipony

New Member
Joined
12 February 2019
Messages
1
I would get a job, I did a few teenager jobs to earn extra money. They were non horse jobs, but great in that they gave me what I wanted.

Could you help out at your local RDA (Riding for the Disabled)? Many people get a 'horse fix' and learn basic horse handling, some places you would also get a ride, but that is not everywhere and to be fair the horses are already hard working in most centres. If you are going GCSEs this year you will also be looking, presumably, to enhance your future CV for either Uni or work, and charity work will do this too.

Are there any horse charities near you? One local to us had kids/teens go and volunteer for the stable jobs and in return would get the odd ride. It would be the odd ride though, as most horses there were old or infirm.

What are your aspirations? If you do well in GCSEs then this is probably not appropriate for your future wealth, but our local college does equine courses. They will take beginners and people who have not passed English/Maths. They do a NVQ1 in year 1 and NVQ2 in year 2. I am unsure how they make the course last that long, but they do regular riding lessons, have a massive indoor school, well qualified instructors, have outdoor arenas too, and it is counted as full time education, so if you had not planned on further academic qualifications then this could be an option. I don't think it is as likely as some options to lead to future employment though.
Hi red 1 can I ask where your based? I’m interested in doing those courses you mention
 
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