Selling my best pal

Miss L Toe

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I always said I would only sell him to a home where he would be looked after properly, now the perfect person wants to try him, and I am sure they will offer to buy, I am already feeling weepy!
He really has to go as I am running out of cash and he is just wasted with me, oh woe is me!
I can't even decide how much I want for him, so that is another problem.
 

mturnbull

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I was in the exact same position as you last year and im not saying i didnt shed a tear (or two or maybe three or four!) but i deffinaitly did not get as upset about the whole situation as he really is in the perfect home with the most wonderful family who love him to pieces. Knowing its the right person and the right home makes everything easier. Hope everything goes well for you :)
 

welshied

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I know exactly how you feel i just sold my horse a few weeks ago after having him for 7 years, but for the same reason as you he was just getting wasted with me but i have seen him in his new home and he is happy as larry.
 

Miss L Toe

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Not to worry, no one showed up to look at him, in fact there have three or four people like this, why do they show interest, say he is what they want, tell me they are coming to see him then back out?
In the meantime my boy is less and less happy where he is, and I can't find a new place for him, its a pain.
 

peaceandquiet1

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Have come to the conclusion that there are a lot of very rude inconsiderate joyriders out there, having posted a thread about the problems encountered when selling our much loved first pony. Then suddenly a viewer with good manners appeared and made a decision that same day to buy. I think you just have to keep the faith that the right person will come along, and won't muck you about. Btw even if she hadn't bought our pony, I still felt she would have had the courtesy to let me know her decision.
 

Miss L Toe

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Yes, I would never go and look at a horse if I were not interested in buying one, never mind asking about them,
From a vendors point of view, I always ask enough questions to make sure they are not wasting either my time or theirs.
 
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I went thru this 3 weeks ago. Its heart wrenching.
How can u put a price on your best pal...u cant!
So i did this instead...
Detached myself from the emotions & priced him according to his age, ability, breeding, looks & potential.

After several timewasters i found the perfect ppl. I used my instincts as that was what drew me to him in the first place.

hope this helps xx
 

Miss L Toe

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I have been unable to sell my horse, and as the yard he is at is making him unhappy, I have agreed to loan him to a good [professional] home, but I don/t think they will be able to buy him at the price advertised.
If he was happy , I would let him go for less, I don't feel I need a loan agreement, as I know he will be looked after properly, I just am not sure what to do as it would be unfair to sell him to someone else after they had put a lot of time and work in to him, it is most likely anyone buying him would be known to the loanee, and he would stay in the yard.
Has anyone any experience of selling a share in a horse, as this would mean I would have to be consulted but the loanee would have an interest in selling.
Once I pass over the passport, should I get written agreement that this is a loan not a sale, the loanee is arranging transport but won't be on the lorry.
I might consider driving up in the lorry with the horse, to make sure he knows he has not been abandoned! sorry to waffle.
 

PeterNatt

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Please be very carefull when loaning a horse as so many have gone missing on loan.
Make sure that your horse is Freezemarked on it's shoulder so that it can be identified by anyone. Also ask to see the original passport, driving licence, rates bill of the person loaning the horse and photocopy them. Check out their credit history on something like Riskdisc as this may show something up. Use the BHS loan agreement to draft the loan agreement but get it checked out by an specialist equine solicitor and then issue two copies one for each of you each of which must be signed and dated by both parties
 

Miss L Toe

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Please be very carefull when loaning a horse as so many have gone missing on loan.
Make sure that your horse is Freezemarked on it's shoulder so that it can be identified by anyone. Also ask to see the original passport, driving licence, rates bill of the person loaning the horse and photocopy them. Check out their credit history on something like Riskdisc as this may show something up. Use the BHS loan agreement to draft the loan agreement but get it checked out by an specialist equine solicitor and then issue two copies one for each of you each of which must be signed and dated by both parties
Yes, thanks I know the girl and she is as straight as they come, she is keen to get him and he will be looked after very well, I can go and see him any time, like me she is very dedicated to horse welfare, and used to ride my mare when she was on livery.
 

Tinypony

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I can only advise you to put a loan agreement in place, what would be the harm in doing that? All sorts of things can go wrong with loans, not just neglect or the horse being stolen.
I hope this works out well for you and your horse, at least you'll be able to visit him, which must be a comfort.
 

TGM

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I would strongly urge you to have a loan agreement, however well you know the loaner. We loaned to good friends, but still had a loan agreement in place. Apart from anything else, it makes clear exactly what the loaner and loanee's responsibilities are, and make you think about issues you may not have considered - things like what happens if the horse needs emergency euthanasia etc, who pays for insurance etc.

There is a sample agreement on the BHS website which is what we used as a template.
 

Allover

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I would definitely get a loan agreement drawn up, that way everything is clear to both parties.

I would go down the loaning route, especially if she is as good as you say she is, unless you need the money from selling him.

Best of luck its horrible, i have my mare on loan as a broodmare now and dont think i could sell her, i have to know where she is!! :)
 

Naryafluffy

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I know people who each have a share in a horse, I don't know what if any written agreement is in place and other than knowing both these people and being 99.9% sure that even in a falling out neither of them would use the horse to get back at the other person.
What about a loan agreement with a price written into it just now so that if you wanted to sell the horse the person currently loaning the horse gets first dibs at that price, if she puts a lot of work into him then she's getting a bargin, if she doesn't want to buy then she's had first refusal?
 

canteron

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I agree get a loan agreement. Things happen with horses and there are always random expenses so it is a good idea just to talk them through ....

She needs to have authority to have it PTS if an accident
Who owns the tack and pays for repairs
What if a long term health problem occurs - who pays
When is the dentist due
Who pays for vacs and when are they due
Etc etc

It gives the loaner as much peace of mind as you as they then know their exact liabilities! It is also only fair on the horse as it makes sure all the issues have been thought about.

I think it is as important if you know the person as it is horrible if it goes wrong with a local friend.
 

Ibblebibble

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agree with all the above that a loan agreement is so important, even between friends:) That way everyone knows where they stand and who is responsible for what:)
Sorry to hear you are having to part with your best pal Mrs D:(
 

Fellewell

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Please be very carefull when loaning a horse as so many have gone missing on loan.
Make sure that your horse is Freezemarked on it's shoulder so that it can be identified by anyone. Also ask to see the original passport, driving licence, rates bill of the person loaning the horse and photocopy them. Check out their credit history on something like Riskdisc as this may show something up. Use the BHS loan agreement to draft the loan agreement but get it checked out by an specialist equine solicitor and then issue two copies one for each of you each of which must be signed and dated by both parties
Mrs D, you're probably feeling vulnerable right now and want the best for him and don't want to offend this person who may be perfect for him. Maybe a loan agreement seems vulgar and untrusting when it concerns your best friend. You are concerned about his happiness, please get something in writing. 'Nothing remains constant except for change itself'. Good Luck:)
 

mturnbull

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Im glad you have came to a decision but know how difficult this is. With my last horse I couldn't bear to part with him but realistically I had done all i could with him and neither me or him would progress any further if i held onto him. We loaned him out to a family who heard about him through friends at the yard, we took a loan agreement contract from the BHS website and tailored it to fit us, it allows to not only be legally covered but also to add any little things you want such as I didnt want his bit being changed unless they agreed with me first due to problems I had previously had with him. This allows you the piece of mind (and a piece of paper) that you know means your horse is getting kept to the standard you would want. Consequently after this 1st year of the loan going so well I have given them the option to buy as I have found the perfect next horse (or foal ;) ) and seems silly just to own him on a bit of paper really. We came to an agreed price as they had over the last year done well with him both competetivly and in general care so the home was much more important to me than the price, so although I may not have recieved quite as much as selling him in an open market I know he is happy where he is and they are happy with him. I hope this works out and there are good people out their! :)
 

Miss L Toe

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I am [almost certainly] going let him go on loan where he will be looked after, but I think the loaner wants him to compete, and, knowing him as I do, I don't think he is the right type for this, but anyway, he has a training opportunity, and maybe somebody else will want to buy him, he is ideal as an RC type for someone who wants to learn how to bring a horse on.
The main thing is that she is overweight for him, I don't know how to broach the subject, I know I am at his limit, but he only hacks, and when jumping, has a lighter rider.
 

Miss L Toe

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Last chance scenario: he is moving to a better yard and will be schooled for me, also a potential sharer lives up the road from his new stable, so it might just work, he has had a reprieve, I am very much happier, as things may just be starting to swing my way!
 

Paddy Irish

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Last chance scenario: he is moving to a better yard and will be schooled for me, also a potential sharer lives up the road from his new stable, so it might just work, he has had a reprieve, I am very much happier, as things may just be starting to swing my way!
This sounds like a perfect option , you get to have full say about his health / welfare , someone gets to share the riding and care ( which lots of people would love to do without the responsibility of having to make decisions ) your boy has a chance to develop and be schooled to your wishes , and then when you decide that you finally may be able to let go and sell on , you'll not be offending anyone and no one can say that they've put all the hard work in and that you've sold him out from under them.
 

Miss L Toe

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Hey Ho, all is going well, and he is due to go to his first mini competition [Christmas Series], of the year.
His sharer is a tiny person, and he seems to be very content that she will make big fuss over him , and ask for very little in return!!!! I am a bit more demanding!!!!
 
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Miss L Toe

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Thread resurrected, all those promises were false, apparently he is difficult [err yes], now in another yard, he is a bit bemused, as like me, he has done nothing wrong, he is on a weeks rest, I tried to rasp his feet and he was a bit edgy, but he will come round, its not as if he has been ill treated, he is just a sensitive soul.
 
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