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So I think I’ve found her...

Joined
20 December 2019
Messages
41
Grey mare, all-rounder.
I tried her out last week (and got completely nervous as felt as though I had just entered a competition arena when I had to ride her in front of both of the dealers) so my riding was shit but the horse was very forgiving and stable.
Going to book the 5 stage vetting today. I’m so nervous and am now questioning my horse ability - imposter syndrome is creeping in - can I actually get a horse? Seriously? Me? Am I capable?
YES I AM.
wow this process is equally terrifying and exciting.
 

Auslander

Well-Known Member
Joined
13 November 2010
Messages
10,321
Location
Berkshire
Thank you. The vet has been recommended to me by the yard - nothing to do with dealer.. this should be ok I’m hoping..
What do you mean? Recommended by the yard the horse is currently on?
It's best to use an independent vet, with no connection to the horses owners, the yard it is on, the dealer that's selling it, etc
 

thingstodotoday

Well-Known Member
Joined
22 March 2009
Messages
1,529
Location
Kent/East Sussex border
Have you done or got someone to do everything you want to do with this horse?
Have you tacked her up, seen her loaded, jumped her, hacked her alone, in company, sprayed her with spray, seen her with the hose etc? Just checking as these are all things I know it has been helpful for me to do. Have you been back more than once?
 
Joined
20 December 2019
Messages
41
Ok so I have: ridden her, watched her tacked up, groomed her, got in the stable with her, picked up her feet, seen her jump, watched her legs be washed down with the hose.

I haven’t: taken her for a hack or sprayed anything near her. I’ve been told she has to be sedated to be clipped.

I’ve asked: Is she good to not be ridden for a few days? - yes but a good turnout space is important for her. How is she with other horses? No problem. Does she buck/rear? No but it may take time to settle her in her new yard as she was unsettled when she arrived at dealers. Any vices? No.

What am I missing? Am I going to get her home only to realise I’ve been coaxed into buying a 3 legged donkey? Nervous.

Thanks for the checklist. I plan to be there at the vetting so I will ride her again then. Any other things I should ask?
 
Joined
19 July 2010
Messages
19,759
How is she to catch in from the field? IMO having a bad to catch horse is potentially one of the most frustrating things that can happen with horse ownership.

ETA on a really basic level I want a horse that I like, is sound and pain free, that I can catch and handle safely on the ground, that is sensible and within my capabilities to ride. Other things can be worked around but those basics really are important IME.
 
Joined
20 December 2019
Messages
41
Good point.

One of my other main concerns is that she isn’t spooky. I just will not enjoy her if this is the case. I did ask and they said she isn’t spooky. Do I trust what people tell me?
 
Joined
19 July 2010
Messages
19,759
Something like spookiness is to some degree subjective, depends what the rider can take in their stride and will change for the same animal given a change in surroundings. Take my chestnut mare she will do small jumps at things that are easy to sit too, so a pigeon taking off near her (and they always wait until they are level with her head to very noisily fly away), a pheasant doing the same, litter blowing on the verge and flowers coming into bloom that *weren't there yesterday* will get a small 'eep' and maybe a sidestep but it's very easy to sit to and to keep her straight. Big things like jangly skip lorries, steam engines, and big farm traffic she deals with calmly. Changing home and going somewhere new can also liven her up a bit. So is she too spooky or not? I don't know many horses that are 100% naughty pidgeon proof. ;)
 
Joined
20 December 2019
Messages
41
I’m sure after the vetting I may be able to squeeze in taking her for a hack. That is massively important to me. My problem in all this is time. The horse is based an hour and a half away and I work 3 days a week so I cant just pop over easily (throw in 3 kids to that mix too).
Open fields is a good idea to ask about if I can’t test.

the reason I’m worried is one of the horses I shared was a really spooky mare and the owner told me not to take her to open fields as she gets ‘too excited’. Every time I went out hacking it was like riding a nervous wreck. It didn’t help that the owner also appeared that way too. It got to the stage that I had to give up sharing as I was just wondering at what point the horse was going to bolt into the sunset. I do not want that again. A bit of nerves here and there I get but this horse was scared of birds, flowers, noises at any level, fires, oh and frost. She also started napping when it came to leaving the yard.
 

Meredith

Well-Known Member
Joined
21 February 2013
Messages
2,267
You must do all your checks before vetting.
Passing a vetting is usually an agreement to purchase.
Don’t spend money on a vetting and then check other things.
Not only is it a waste of money if the horse passes but you don’t feel safe hacking, it is doing things the wrong way round.
If you still decide to have the horse vetted consider having bloods taken too.
 

saddle over sofa

Well-Known Member
Joined
1 February 2016
Messages
407
Can you not go for a hack right before the vetting? Not ideal if it doesn’t work out but would save you money and the dealers time.
A vetting isn’t too taxing on the horse so I wouldn’t worry about it being ridden twice - if it’s lame after a hack it’s not going to stay sound!

I personally would never ride/get involved at a vetting. I let the seller do all the trotting up, lunging and riding and just watch. I think it’s a grey area if something happens to the horse whilst vetting and you are in control. I had a horse that was sound at the first flexions, stumbled whilst cantering with the owner riding, then was dog lame on one leg at the second flexions. He failed the vetting. Thankfully it wasn’t me riding as I’d hate to be blamed for the horse stumbling or if it was spooking or whatever caused it to go lame.
 

ihatework

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 September 2004
Messages
16,424
Good point.

One of my other main concerns is that she isn’t spooky. I just will not enjoy her if this is the case. I did ask and they said she isn’t spooky. Do I trust what people tell me?
Did your new YO/adviser come and check this horse out for you?

I’d advise going back for a hack between now and the vetting.

A horse that ‘takes a while to settle at new yard’ will have a personality with some underlying anxiety - perfectly manageable for someone experienced but not necessarily ideal for a first timer.

Please just make sure someone has tested this horse out for you
 

Upthecreek

Well-Known Member
Joined
9 May 2019
Messages
262
The other thing I would say is don’t be rushed into this. The dealer has probably told you there is other people interested in the horse, which may well be true, but you don’t want to end up with an unsuitable horse because you felt under pressure to make a quick decision. The last horse I bought was in winter, similar weather conditions as we are experiencing now. Like you, a horse that hacked out sensibly was very important to me. I went to view a horse, rode it in the arena and really liked it. I was told it would confidently hack out alone but when I asked to hack they came up with every excuse under the sun not to. I walked away because that was a deal breaker for me. The point is you shouldn’t be afraid to say this horse isn’t the one for you at any time if something doesn’t feel right.
 

Pearlsasinger

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 February 2009
Messages
27,398
Location
W. Yorks
Another one saying do all the riding you need to do before the vetting and do make sure that your 'experienced friend'/YO has seen you ride the horse before the vetting, too. If you are nervous about riding the horse in a certain situation, that is the very situation you should test out before agreeing to purchase, especially as a first time owner.
 
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