So what do you do when your child really is allergic to the dog?

MissCandy

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We have a 9 month old pup who really is a part of the family. There are no issues other than my daughter is allergic.

I keep them seperate as much as possible and pup is no longer allowed in any carpeted areas but it's making little difference.

Rehoming is not top on my list of options but the only other viable one I can think of is keeping him outside. He would be on his own.

So, what would you do?
 

freckles22uk

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My daughter is allergic to cats, rabbits and horses, we have had all 3, the cats were never allowed in the house, and even now my daughter is grown up and left home, I still dont have them in as the fur/dust/saliva can hang around a long time in the air/carpet/furniture (she comes over for a holiday once a year) she has her own horse and does have to take antihistamines when seeing him, and takes them everyday when she comes to visit as Ive got horses, (luckily shes not allergic to dogs) It can be manageable if you are happy your daughter being permanently on antihistamines
 

MissCandy

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My daughter is allergic to cats, rabbits and horses, we have had all 3, the cats were never allowed in the house, and even now my daughter is grown up and left home, I still dont have them in as the fur/dust/saliva can hang around a long time in the air/carpet/furniture (she comes over for a holiday once a year) she has her own horse and does have to take antihistamines when seeing him, and takes them everyday when she comes to visit as Ive got horses, (luckily shes not allergic to dogs) It can be manageable if you are happy your daughter being permanently on antihistamines
She's only 3 so giving her antihistamines is not something I'm comfortable with as a long term solution.

Can you tell us the breed?
He's a beagle x pug (can of worms for this forum I know)

It's the hair that's a nightmare, I honestly don't know how he's not bald with the amount he sheds! I Hoover every day (including the dog!), he gets brushed every day and still the amount of hair in the Hoover is unbelievable.

Im not trying to get rid of him by the way or looking for people to tell me to do that. I'm hoping, like freckles, that people do manage this kind of situation and can give me some ideas.
 

Bellasophia

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Hi again...I was hoping he was a type you could shave down.Never mind...
I have two sons,both allergic to certain hair types so these are my suggestions..
Wash the dog every week to remove dander that provokes allergic responses...use a mild shampoo such as johnsons baby,so the dogs skin doesn't become dry and a problem in itself.
get rid of carpets where you can,..they harbor dust and you can mop a wood or tiled floor far easier..
Use a shedding blade...see www.groomers.online
This will pull off the loose hair and also get any undercoat out of the dog...
Give the dog an omega 3 and 6 capsule each week...good for skin and hair.
Wash child's hands after interaction with dog..
Wash dogs bedding every two days..
Hoover carpets daily..

Your dog is a combo of two shedding breeds,especially the pug so you will have to keep a regular bathing schedule if you want to cut down on the shed.
 

Princess16

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I would rehome the dog. My children would always come first.
Got to say I tend to agree with this as hard as it is . Did you not know about her allergy before you got him? Have you asked the doc? As you say 3 years is too young to be on antihistamines . Child has to come first IMO. Even if he was permanently outside (which won't be ideal in winter) won't she still come into contact with him?

If it had been a dog you have had for years I would probably feel different but as you've only had him 9 months I would try and re-home.
 

MissCandy

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Hi again...I was hoping he was a type you could shave down.Never mind...
I have two sons,both allergic to certain hair types so these are my suggestions..
Wash the dog every week to remove dander that provokes allergic responses...use a mild shampoo such as johnsons baby,so the dogs skin doesn't become dry and a problem in itself.
get rid of carpets where you can,..they harbor dust and you can mop a wood or tiled floor far easier..
Use a shedding blade...see www.groomers.online
This will pull off the loose hair and also get any undercoat out of the dog...
Give the dog an omega 3 and 6 capsule each week...good for skin and hair.
Wash child's hands after interaction with dog..
Wash dogs bedding every two days..
Hoover carpets daily..

Your dog is a combo of two shedding breeds,especially the pug so you will have to keep a regular bathing schedule if you want to cut down on the shed.
Thanks, I didn't know about omega 3 and 6 so will give that a go and increase his baths to weekly.

Got to say I tend to agree with this as hard as it is . Did you not know about her allergy before you got him? Have you asked the doc? As you say 3 years is too young to be on antihistamines . Child has to come first IMO. Even if he was permanently outside (which won't be ideal in winter) won't she still come into contact with him?

If it had been a dog you have had for years I would probably feel different but as you've only had him 9 months I would try and re-home.
No, we didn't know. My mum had a dog who my daughter came into contact with daily. She was a lab x something or other (rescue) so similar kind of coat although she was older and not as fussy or fun to play with!

Yes, she will always come into contact with him. She loves him and will seek him out even though she knows the consequences. Keeping a puppy and a 3 year old apart is a challenge!

The docs suggestion is to get rid of the dog.

My daughter will always come first but I'm feeling really conflicted. I've brought this pup into our lives and the whole family is attached (I also have a 7 year old son) We will all be heartbroken if he's no longer a part of the family.
 
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numptynoelle

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I feel for you, what a horrible situation. I do feel that rehoming the dog will be better for you all in the long-run, even if you aren't popular with your son for a while! Allergies are difficult to predict, if you continue to have the dog, you must also be prepared for the fact your daughter may have a severe reaction at some point. She may "grow out" of it, but she may not - I know plenty of people who thought they had out-grown a childhood food allergy, only to have a severe reaction later down the line.
 

ljohnsonsj

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How long have you had him? I have an allergy too but it was never really bad, I take anthistemines but when I pretty much grew out of it the more I was around them. and when they are moulting is when I take anthishtermines, but I am fine the rest of the time.
 

stencilface

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My sister is allergic to dogs and horses, and we have always had both. She is careful not to touch her skin after touching them, and often doesn't need to take any antihistamines or anything. But she is more allergic with new animals - I think her immune system just gives in with our own pets!

How long has she had this reaction for, can you tell if the allergy is getting better or worse?

Could you confine the dog to only being on hard floors in the house and being left outside? My neighbours beagle gets left out when the go out sometimes and he has a kennel in the garden with a heated pad in so he doesn't feel put out. Plus being a beagle he loves being outside and sniffing
 

MyOldPony

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If the child is bad and the dog is suffering as a consiquence by being isolated then I think rehousing would not be a bad option, I think you would be justified in your choice.
 

Clodagh

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I am allergic to horses and live on meds for it. It is boring and not something I would want to inflict on a child, as you say. Could you rehome him to a family member perhaps so you could still see him, walk him and so on. I think living outside would be no fun for him, I understand it with working dogs but not for pets.
 

Kaylum

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op is your child allergic to dogs or allergic to dust mites as dogs are a walking home for dust mite dung. As already suggested keep the dog as clean as you can and see if you see a difference.
 

Boxers

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I'm afraid I'm another who wuld say rehome the dog.

Being allergic to something is a PITA (i know because I have lots of allergies) And as your daughter is only 3 she must suffer terribly.

Constantly monitoring where the dog is, where your daughter is, washing the dog, washing te bedding, hoovering etc, is not the way to enjoy a pet.
 

planete

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There is another option which is only used by the NHS in this country for people whose allergies are so severe it threatens their quality of life. It is desensitisation to the allergens as determined by tests. This involves gradually increasing small doses of the allergen at regular intervals, usually monthly. Ironically this is available for dogs though the desensitisation agent has to be bought from abroad. I know it works as I was treated by this method when in my twenties in France.

There are proper allergy clinics in this country I believe but be very careful of the quacks peddling some home-brewed cure. You could do worse than get a vet' s help perhaps in finding a reliable clinic! A vet should know what the treatment should involve.
 

Orangehorse

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Our local NHS hospital does these allergy clinics, and they are very good I believe.

My first reaction would be to rehome the dog, but your 7 year old son is going to be very upset and might not forgive you or his sister easily.

I think in the circumstances I would a) put in place the regime suggested above, i.e. wash dog,bedding, etc. etc. and b) find out about any allergy clinics and just hope that either or both provide a solution.
 

Imogen Rose

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I just wanted to let you know that it can work. Im very very allergic to cats, dogs, horses, rabbits, hay, sawdust... the list goes on. I have been hospitalized due to allergies, carry an epipen, and take inhalers for asthma.
I dont however take antihistamines on a daily basis.
Continuous exposure is the way forward. It will be two months of sniffy, itchy, rashy, coughing weepy eyes but it is worth it. When we got our puppy two years ago he set off my asthma everyday for about a month, and I coughed and sneezed for weeks. I spent as much time as possible with him, not taking antihistamines, just washing my hands before i touched my face. after enough time the body just gets over it! its hard to beleive but it does! People that dont know me well dont know im allergic to dogs. I cuddle them on the floor and in their bed, give them kisses etc. but if i come into contact with another dog i get an asthma attack, cough and sneeze. then i get a rash where i touched the dog and my face goes red and puffy.

I can honestly say continuous exposure works for me, my cat sleeps on my pillow! I just wanted you to know there is another option :)
 

poiuytrewq

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Hi op. I feel so bad for you!
When I was little my mum and dad had to get rid of our family pet, in this case a cat not dog but as children we loved her the same and Luke your puppy she was part of the family.
My mum rehomed her. She went on the understanding that we'd visit monthly. We did a few times but it fizzled out eventually as I'm sure my mum knew it would!
My point is you will all be upset but if Rehoming becomes your only option your children will forgive you!
 

poiuytrewq

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I didn't say, it was due to severe allergies in my little sister who was 3, I was about 6 so similar to your childre- hence the relevance!
 

numptynoelle

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I just wanted to let you know that it can work. Im very very allergic to cats, dogs, horses, rabbits, hay, sawdust... the list goes on. I have been hospitalized due to allergies, carry an epipen, and take inhalers for asthma.
I dont however take antihistamines on a daily basis.
Continuous exposure is the way forward. It will be two months of sniffy, itchy, rashy, coughing weepy eyes but it is worth it. When we got our puppy two years ago he set off my asthma everyday for about a month, and I coughed and sneezed for weeks. I spent as much time as possible with him, not taking antihistamines, just washing my hands before i touched my face. after enough time the body just gets over it! its hard to beleive but it does! People that dont know me well dont know im allergic to dogs. I cuddle them on the floor and in their bed, give them kisses etc. but if i come into contact with another dog i get an asthma attack, cough and sneeze. then i get a rash where i touched the dog and my face goes red and puffy.

I can honestly say continuous exposure works for me, my cat sleeps on my pillow! I just wanted you to know there is another option :)
See, I can understand you deciding to take that approach for yourself (and I assume as an adult) but the thought of deliberately making a toddler go through similar when they are too little to understand does break my heart a little. Especially as it seems to be very dog-specific reaction.

OP, as before, I do really feel for you, it's a horrible situation to be in - and if you decide to keep the pup I wish you all the luck in the world in coming to a solution that suits you all.
 

SpringArising

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See, I can understand you deciding to take that approach for yourself (and I assume as an adult) but the thought of deliberately making a toddler go through similar when they are too little to understand does break my heart a little.
I agree with this. I think it's OK to take the initiative to stick it out for yourself, but when it's a child and a very young one especially, I don't think it's fair. There's no way to explain to them why you're doing it or why they can't sleep because they are insufferably itchy.
 

MissCandy

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Sorry, I've only just seen these replies.

I feel like I'm between the devil and the deep blue sea. On the one hand we have a dog and all the responsibility that brings and then I have my daughter who I really really don't want to see suffering.

I am hopeful at the moment though, since the pup has been banished*, the Hoover is on twice a day, bedding is washed and he smells like johnsons baby shampoo, that my daughter does seem less itchy. Hopefully she will continue to improve and I don't mind this routine really.

I'll continue to try new things - the omega 3 and 6 for example and hope that we can find a good permanent solution where everyone's happy and healthy.

Re-homing really has to be the last resort. I can't bear to think of it until I've tried everything and as long as my daughters symptoms are manageable without drugs.

*please know that he's not really isolated, he now spends most of his time in a sectioned part of the open plan kitchen/diner/sitting room with a hard floor and a 3 seater leather settee for his comfort. He has access to the garden, is walked twice a day and has lots of contact with us -just not my daughter so much and he doesn't have access to the living room or any carpeted areas.
 
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numptynoelle

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Sorry, I've only just seen these replies.

I feel like I'm between the devil and the deep blue sea. On the one hand we have a dog and all the responsibility that brings and then I have my daughter who I really really don't want to see suffering.

I am hopeful at the moment though, since the pup has been banished*, the Hoover is on twice a day, bedding is washed and he smells like johnsons baby shampoo, that my daughter does seem less itchy. Hopefully she will continue to improve and I don't mind this routine really.

I'll continue to try new things - the omega 3 and 6 for example and hope that we can find a good permanent solution where everyone's happy and healthy.

Re-homing really has to be the last resort. I can't bear to think of it until I've tried everything and as long as my daughters symptoms are manageable without drugs.

*please know that he's not really isolated, he now spends most of his time in a sectioned part of the open plan kitchen/diner/sitting room with a hard floor and a 3 seater leather settee for his comfort. He has access to the garden, is walked twice a day and has lots of contact with us -just not my daughter so much and he doesn't have access to the living room or any carpeted areas.
Thanks for updating us - sounds like you've got a good set-up going, I really hope the improvement continues and it all works out for you all :)
 

honetpot

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I just wanted to let you know that it can work. Im very very allergic to cats, dogs, horses, rabbits, hay, sawdust... the list goes on. I have been hospitalized due to allergies, carry an epipen, and take inhalers for asthma.
I dont however take antihistamines on a daily basis.
Continuous exposure is the way forward. It will be two months of sniffy, itchy, rashy, coughing weepy eyes but it is worth it. When we got our puppy two years ago he set off my asthma everyday for about a month, and I coughed and sneezed for weeks. I spent as much time as possible with him, not taking antihistamines, just washing my hands before i touched my face. after enough time the body just gets over it! its hard to beleive but it does! People that dont know me well dont know im allergic to dogs. I cuddle them on the floor and in their bed, give them kisses etc. but if i come into contact with another dog i get an asthma attack, cough and sneeze. then i get a rash where i touched the dog and my face goes red and puffy.

I can honestly say continuous exposure works for me, my cat sleeps on my pillow! I just wanted you to know there is another option :)
This can be true, in fact if you remove the allergen completely when next exposed the reaction can be more severe. So the theory of treating allergies now seems to be reducing the allergens to a level so the symptoms are reduced and the bodies immune system can becomes desensitised. Apparently cat dander is worse.
No one wants to see a child in distress, but if the symptoms can be reduced what a pleasure having a dog is to any child.
 
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