Stallions and turn out

_jetset_

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My stallion was quite settled last year being turned out at night next to two colts (2 yrs) where he could groom over the fence.

This year he is now 4 years old and has been away collecting at stud. He has just come home and I have turned him out in his own field with slightly higher fencing and he is just not settling. He can see the other horses but I'm wondering if he is not settling because he cannot touch anything?

The main issue I have is that my horses are all mares other than my one 3 year old colt so I am very limited with where these two can go.

Those who have stallions turned out, can they touch another horse?
 

Alexart

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Of course he's not settling he's a herd animal and is now totally isolated!! If he was happy with the 2 colts, he was still a colt last year himself, then why was he not turned out with them?
He's still a baby so you should really have him in a bachelor herd before he becomes too antisocial and frustrated and you're stuck. I'd stick him right next to the other colt just to make sure they are happy with each other, then put them out together - you'll have 2 far happier easier to handle horses - it's cruel to keep a herd animal on it's own irrespective of value or wether it's a breeding animal - the longer you leave it the more obsessed he'll get and the harder to handle and work he'll become. I've always had breeding stallions, geldings and colts all in one herd and they've been very happy normal horses.
 

Lgd

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My 3yo runs out in the field next to the geldings at the moment. He was in with our elderly gelding but was wanting to play all the time and the old boy was finding it hard work (he is 32yo).
We are introducing him over the fence to one of the other geldings and they will go in to together at a suitable point. We did try putting them in together before but the gelding chased poor Fly through two fences and wouldn't let him anywhere near. Yet happy to be nearby over the fence - boys :rolleyes:
 

_jetset_

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The two colts are no longer here and he was just next to them last year not with them.

The three year old colt I have is very immature and my stallion is a big strapping breeding stallion who knows his job. I am looking into splitting his field in half and having the colt in the other half so they can touch over the fence but not cause too much damage.
 

micramadam

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Our 3 year old colt was in with 3 geldings till earlier this year. They really kept him in his place and he could play to his heart's content. Field was right next to the mares! He was no problem but when the mares started to come into season in February, they would stand with their backsides towards him. (Funny how they all came into season at the same time?) Bunch of slappers!
Naturally we moved him as want no problems or accidents. He was in with the 20 yr old Fjord for a while but not ideal as he had no- one to play with. He's now out with a pony gelding and they play great. He can still see the mares but not get anywhere near them. In the fields on both sides there are 2 geldings.
He is much happier again now and as long as we can keep this arrangement so is everyone else on the yard.
 

_jetset_

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Thank you for the replies. Ultimately he is a competition horse so his safety is paramount.

Tonight I moved everything up a field so my competition mare and her 3 years old companion are next to the broodmares and there is a field gap before the stallion. He is much more settled as a result as he can see everything. I'm going out in a few minutes to check he is still where I left him as its a permanent electric fence of 3ft.
 

sallyf

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Thank you for the replies. Ultimately he is a competition horse so his safety is paramount.

Tonight I moved everything up a field so my competition mare and her 3 years old companion are next to the broodmares and there is a field gap before the stallion. He is much more settled as a result as he can see everything. I'm going out in a few minutes to check he is still where I left him as its a permanent electric fence of 3ft.
Crieky mine are very well behaved but i would never have a stallion behind anything other than a nice big post and rail fence.
 

_jetset_

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It's a permanent electric fencing so extremely secure and four strands of electric rope. It's actually better than post an rail in my opinion as I have had horses run through post and rail but they do not go near this fencing at all as all off the mains power too.

It's a fantastic job, will post some photos of it as very pleased with it.

My boy is lay down fast asleep in the field this morning so a very happy stallion and very happy mummy!
 

_jetset_

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Just tried to get a video on here but it won't copy over... He is snoring so loudly that the Broodies keep staring at him! His mystique has well and truly dissolved!
 

Rollin

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Crieky mine are very well behaved but i would never have a stallion behind anything other than a nice big post and rail fence.
I have two stallions and all electric fencing on my farm on permanent wooden posts - just two strands!!
 

henryhorn

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I would put the colt next to him, and watch for a bit to ensure no fighting.
Our late stallion Harpers Bornival spent his days next to one of his adult gelding sons and they were best friends. Until we did this he stayed alone and spent hours fence running. I wish we had tried it years ago.
 

_jetset_

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Thanks henryhorn... I moved him to a different field where he can see all the mares and he is very happy and settled.

I don't know how long my colt will be here for as ultimately he is for sale so wanted to sort a solution longer term. Thankfully, it looks as though he likes seeing all he owns
 

sallyf

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Rollin that is what mine is. We have the whole 18 acres in permanent electric.
I still wouldnt do it,
Stallions often strike and if he strikes at another colt through a rope fence the injury wouldnt bear thinking about.
I have 2 horses here with permanent scars from permanent electric fencing runs from a very large mains unit.
One round her neck where she took flight and ran through it and another who struck at another horse and has a similar scar around her hoof.
Rach to there own i suppose but with anything up to 8 stallions and 50 mares on the place at any one time we have big solid 3 rail post and rail with gaps between the fields.
In the last 6 years we havnt had any injuries through horses running through fencing or striking at it.
Can only say it as i see it.
I guess it also depends how many horses are around to cause distractions ,we obviously have a lot.
Anyway its just my experience and opinion and obviously some of the stallions we have in have a huge value so we cant take any sort of a chance
 

Dry Rot

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Another one with permanent electric fencing off a mains energiser BUT I always maintain a gap of at least 3 or 4 metres anywhere the stallion could reach over a gate, etc. next to females.

Until last year, I had an old yeld mare as his companion and befrore that a gelding. He is now in with pregnant mares and I am leaning more and more to a natural system where he runs with mares and foals all the time.
 

Crazy Friesian

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Safely tucked away...
I have had my stallion since he was 10 months old. I have NEVER separated him from the herd - unless for his own safety (other horses ganging up on him..) He was with my older guy until I lost him last year. He then had a period where he didn't have a field friend which was tough all round, though he would often say hi to the other horses on his way in from the field.

This year I have managed to put my connemara gelding in with him who is totally unfazed by a lump twice his size wanting to hoon around and play. If he gets OTT, the Connie just puts him back in his place.

One thing I learnt from working with stallions previously is that is is a big mistake to separate them from other horses - competition or no - you have to weigh all things up and put them into perspective. He is a horse first and foremost. Wrapping him up in cotton wool is a false economy... :-/

Glad you have moved your guy so he can see others. :)
 

Rollin

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I still wouldnt do it,
Stallions often strike and if he strikes at another colt through a rope fence the injury wouldnt bear thinking about.
I have 2 horses here with permanent scars from permanent electric fencing runs from a very large mains unit.
One round her neck where she took flight and ran through it and another who struck at another horse and has a similar scar around her hoof.
Rach to there own i suppose but with anything up to 8 stallions and 50 mares on the place at any one time we have big solid 3 rail post and rail with gaps between the fields.
In the last 6 years we havnt had any injuries through horses running through fencing or striking at it.
Can only say it as i see it.
I guess it also depends how many horses are around to cause distractions ,we obviously have a lot.
Anyway its just my experience and opinion and obviously some of the stallions we have in have a huge value so we cant take any sort of a chance
I understand what you are saying but in my experience the ones likely to take out the electric fence are the mares - and they can do that with other mares - especially the Arabs. Striking out just breaks our fittings and pulls down a small bottom section plus of course they get a zap!!!

I have 10 mares and fillies, plus two geldings and two stallions on 30 acres. I have 10 paddocks. When the mares come into season I do make sure we have two runs of fencing between them and the stallions.

The stallions are much happier if they each have a herd to watch.

Also my CB stallion has a stable with a talk grill, he has three favourite mares who I can stable beside him - they like him too.
 

Angela_Wise

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We have electric fencing with stallions out at night. It double fenced with a 6' gap and the inner fencing is independant to the outer fencing so if we get a short both lines never go down. We find this works great with shy/maiden mares as the boys chat them up and the mares are then more confident around them when we are teasing.

We have had a mare go through the fencing to get to another mare, as we have had the odd mare that jumps the electric (4'6") but we havent had a breach of the stallion paddocks. We have also had a mare go right through the post and rails taking out all three rails.

Its our job to make it as safe as possible and do risk assessments on each new arrival but IMO stallions are easy to manage when in a routine which suits them as individuals, but with some mares their goal posts are always moving!
 

shirleyno2

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I currently have 11 yearling colts in one field and 9 stallions all turned out together with stock fencing and high tensile electric. I say stallions - they are 2 and 3 years. I no longer turn 4 year stallions out with others due to too many accidents, four years ago we had an horrific ordeal with 2 stallions on 28 acres. It's just not worth it.
I totally agree they are herd animals. Until a point, then it can get messy, of course every stallion is different.
 

_jetset_

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I think my stallion would be ok with another horse but he does want to play as he is still four and I can imagine it would get quite rough. Hence the reason I will not turn him out with anything else.

He is, however, most content being able to see all the mares in his new field. He had his second night in there last night and looks to have been very settled so good news!
 

Impu1sion

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Glad he has settled! I just thought that a 3' fence seems ridiculously low! I thought stallions usually had high fencing?:confused:
 

FreddiesGal

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I think my stallion would be ok with another horse but he does want to play as he is still four and I can imagine it would get quite rough. Hence the reason I will not turn him out with anything else.

He is, however, most content being able to see all the mares in his new field. He had his second night in there last night and looks to have been very settled so good news!
I find this sad. He's a horse, not a Shih Tzu.

They're designed to be with other horses. IMO it's almost worse letting him see but not touch.
 

Enfys

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Zeus and his friend:

http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=606889

I think that there is no one rule for stallions, turnout and companions. You have to take every horse as an individual, and go with the set up you have, the available companions and use your head. Above all engage common sense. Ditch the fluffy bunny, tree hugging sentiments, they have no place near an animal that, at times, is ruled by his hormones.


It is all very well saying that a stallion should have company but in reality it isn't that simple. Yes, stallions are just horses, but they are also entires and with that goes everything that a stallion, by thousands of years of evolution, is. Some stallions love a friend to play with, others will try to kill it, some get aggressive, some possessive, some calm down. Sometimes a horse is too valuable, or has a job to do, to risk him getting injured, perhaps mortally.
 

FreddiesGal

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It is all very well saying that a stallion should have company but in reality it isn't that simple. Yes, stallions are just horses, but they are also entires and with that goes everything that a stallion, by thousands of years of evolution, is. Some stallions love a friend to play with, others will try to kill it, some get aggressive, some possessive, some calm down. Sometimes a horse is too valuable, or has a job to do, to risk him getting injured, perhaps mortally.
Yep, and it's something I understand. It's just something I'll never agree with.

I enjoyed the pics of yours playing :)
 

htobago

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Zeus and his friend:

http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=606889

I think that there is no one rule for stallions, turnout and companions. You have to take every horse as an individual, and go with the set up you have, the available companions and use your head. Above all engage common sense. Ditch the fluffy bunny, tree hugging sentiments, they have no place near an animal that, at times, is ruled by his hormones.


It is all very well saying that a stallion should have company but in reality it isn't that simple. Yes, stallions are just horses, but they are also entires and with that goes everything that a stallion, by thousands of years of evolution, is. Some stallions love a friend to play with, others will try to kill it, some get aggressive, some possessive, some calm down. Sometimes a horse is too valuable, or has a job to do, to risk him getting injured, perhaps mortally.
Where's the 'like' button! So nice to see someone who doesn't automatically assume that what works for her stallion is the best and only way to do things!

Love those photos of your boy happily playing with his companions, but as you rightly say, this isn't possible for everyone.

Nothing to add to your points except that sometimes, if companions or other horses 'next door' are not an option, a toy can help keep some stallions amused.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/93031247@N06/8689818924/in/photostream
 
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