Stringhalt - Your experiences please

moneypit1

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Does the stringhalt affect your horses performance and to what degree? Also would you buy a horse with this condition even if it was very mild and barely noticeable and the horse seemed perfect for what you want it for? thankies
 

missparis

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To answer both your questions - no and yes. as long as it's mild and has no affect on the performance, I can't see any issues. A fair few competition horses do suffer from stringhault and shivers and this doesn't stop them competing from the top levels.
 

Ladyinred

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No and yes as long as it is mild. I used to ride a great horse with quite severe stringhalt and he was fine once warmed up. You do need a patient farrier in lots of cases.
 

horseriderdeb

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31 October 2006
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My old shire has stringhalt and shivers. It wouldn't stop me buying another one with theses complaints. My daughters warmblood has slight shivers. Like someone has said you need a very patient farrier.
 

L&M

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I had a horse with very mild stringhalt and the condition did not worsen in the 6 yrs of ownership. He lead a totally normal life, hunting and SJ, and the only time it was apparent was when he came out the lorry, or when being shod, but even then never a real issue.

It would not be a condition that would put me off buying a horse as long as it was not severe and was reflected in the price.
 

soulfull

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maybe and no

Stringhalt is often managable as in these cases above. However increasing work load can make it worse. It is caused by spasmatic contraction of the lateral extensor tendons of the hind legs. The nature of it is that the horse cannot control when it happens, which is usually at rest but not always.
The horse I used to ride with it got worse as he got older and even started having a problem coming from canter to trot (very uncomfortable for both rider and horse)

As Pidgeon says it doesn't affect what he can do but I do know 2 others that have had to give up competing and just hack the one I have told you about then ended up on walk only hacks so that if it happened at least it was a safe speed.

There are plenty of perfectly healthy horses out there so why buy one you already know to have a problem. Its easy enough to develop problems without already having one!!

Just not worth the risk IMHO
 

glitterbug

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3 March 2009
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A previous horse of mine had it mildly and although it never affected his work, he was once spun on at the vets inspection on the 3rd day of a 3DE as according to the ground jury (it was in France)' he showed signs of stringhalt at the first inspection, which was not a problem, but not at this one so something must be wrong although he is not lame' .:eek: :( As you can imagine I was not best pleased but nothing I could do.

Personally it wouldn't put me off again as long as it was mild.
 
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