Stump protection?

mynutmeg

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For treating foallys navel at birth the last vet out to see Roo said to use iodine but most of what I'm reading says that iodine is too caustic to use and recommends chlorahexadine 0.5%. I think my preference is the cholorhexadine but am not sure where to get it. I know it's the main active ingredient in hibiscrub so can I just dilute hibiscrub to the correct concentration and use that?
 

oldywoldy

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Hibiscrub diluted is the best. We put it in a spray bottle. There is also a new product made by vetericyn but I am having trouble finding someone who stocks it saw it at beta.
 

Alec Swan

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Protecting the navel is to prevent the up-take of Joint Ill, and it would be extremely rare when the foal is born onto clean bedding. Deep litter bedding would be asking for trouble.

I use iodine on everything which is born "In", calves, foals and lambs, whether they're on clean bedding, or not. Iodine dries and dehydrates the navel and umbilical cord, very quickly, as would a normal aerosol Purple Spray (Oxytetracyclin).

It's the drying factor which is important, I believe, as infection is set in through a wet umbilical cord, and I wonder if Hibiscrub wouldn't encourage the cord and navel to stay wet. I knew one woman who washed a foal's navel every day for a week, until it was raw, and she did it because she said that the vet told her to!! :confused:

Alec.
 

Alexart

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I've always used either iodine or blue spray on anything from lambs/fawns/piglets and foals, as Alec said it's the drying of it that's the important bit - a dry umbilical is far harder for bacteria to enter than a wet one.
 

mynutmeg

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I was kinda thinking hibiscrub then purple spray - you can't be too careful :p
She's definately on clean straw - I'm being almost anal about getting everything out every day and I hate deep litter. My girl wasin my sisters cobs box for 2 nights while her stable dried and got thrush. He deep littered and she's not. Have never, ever had an issue with it before so an only think it's down to the deep litter bed
 

Spring Feather

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I would use chlorohexidine if I could get hold of it but I can't so I use an iodine tincture. It's less abrasive than straight iodine and I only have to spray it on for a couple of days and the stump will have dried up by then.
 

cruiseline

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I agree with Alec and all of ours get the purple spray treatment. I did try hibiscrub and surgical spirits on one, but it left the stump too wet for my liking, so I changed back to the purple spray.
 

Maesfen

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I agree with Alec and all of ours get the purple spray treatment. I did try hibiscrub and surgical spirits on one, but it left the stump too wet for my liking, so I changed back to the purple spray.
Have to say, while my vet recommended it, I still prefer the blue spray for the same reason as you.
 

lizness

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I think Hibitane may be this? I've heard it recommended for this? I believe that is simular to Hibiscrub but without the soap element used in dentistry.
 

chrissie1

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I have heard it said that iodine can cause the stump to dry too much, which leads to cracks in the surface which allow bacertia in.

We use dilute Hibiscrub, then follow it up with 'purple' spray as required.
 
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