Surely there are worse places for a horse to end up....

Joined
27 October 2011
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55
Location
Lincs
than a riding school
especially in the current climate.
General bored at work musings really as i have been tasked with finding a couple to fill some empty stables we now have :( so i have spent far too much time today browsing websites :p
Obviously not all horses are suitable for a RS, but am so far having no luck







Ah well, has killed some time :D
 

Rosiefell

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3 September 2006
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190
I've recently sold a pony to a riding school and I'm really pleased that's where she's gone to :). Regular work, limited grazing and plenty of attention, just what she needs!!
 

Spotsrock

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8 June 2008
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The routine would probably suit my boy better than anything else plus he loves kids. I'm not sure i'm ready to part with him yet though.
 
Joined
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Lincs
Glad to know there are some people who would consider it at least :p
We desperately need a little'un for just off the lead rein kids, and a 15 hand ish for all abilities, basically the kind of thing everyone wants though :p
 

AdorableAlice

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24 October 2011
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Nothing wrong with horses in riding schools. I am sure if you asked the many horses/ponies to be seen alongside the motorways in the Midlands if they would prefer to stay where they are, picking a living in the rubble and scrap or be part of a riding school they would pick the school.

Schools are regulated and equine welfare can be enforced.
 

Onyxia

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26 May 2005
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Yorkshire
I think the problem is when people talk about riding schools that tend to jump to the low end scummy types- obviously a horse that only goes in circles with novice riders bumping their backs (often more then the horse should be carrying too ) for extended periods will shut down and switch off.

However, a GOOD riding school will offer a much greater variety of work then most private homes,regular schooling from qualified riders on the staff and top notch care and plenty of attention from staff as well as clients- what more could a horse ask?

ETA- I will correct myself, what more could a suitable horse ask?
Some of course will not enjoy the atmosphere or may need more one to one attention or simply dislike riders of differing levels on their backs, but for a horse that would fit the bill, a good RS is a good life.
 

thatsmygirl

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22 May 2010
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I tried to loan my 100% bomeproff lead rein gelding to a riding school but although he can be ridden off lead rein he would need to good rider hence lead rein really. Done allsorts and very sadly outgrown, my daughter rode him from when she was 2 - 10 yrs old. Sat doing nothing now but won't sell. They didn't want him as he was to small 10.3hh
 

Firewell

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8 May 2008
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7,817
I think it depends on the riding school!
Theres a really scummy one a little way from where I live, the horses look like black beauty when he was down on his luck :(. All boney with ewe necks, heads on the floor and dead eyes.
However there is another one literally seconds from my house and all their horses when they go riding past look like any privately owned horses. Plump and happy with shiney eyes :).
 

GinaGeo

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23 October 2011
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753
For the right horse yes. And for small, possibly laminitic ponies yes. They get they work they require and the management they need.

However, I saw too many "difficult" horses ruined by the riding school, as in an attempt to make them safe they were overbitted. Due to economic reasons, the tack often wasn't the best fitting, although the best that could be afforded. Whilst some horses can put up with not perfectly tack, other can't and have something to say on the matter.

My current horse would not be suitable. He's very sensitive and would likely be labeled a rearer and dangerous. He's not, you just have to ride him very sensitively in a snaffle and ride from your seat, something, alot (not all!) riding school riders would be capable of. He also has too much of a sense of humour. My dad decided, he wanted to take up riding last summer, So he got stuck on my horse. Horse trotted down a hill and popped his head down and my dad slid down his neck into a pile of nettles... :D He's not ridden since :rolleyes:

For the right horse I wouldn't oppose a riding school. My first pony was a riding school pony. She was the ideal laminitic and she got the work she needed and was managed correctly when she was there.
 

Jesstickle

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11 December 2008
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12,299
I think a RS environment is probably pretty perfect for plenty of plump little ponies that need lots of work. I don't think any RS in there right mind would want BH but if they did and I liked the way it was run I certainly wouldn't have a problem with him going to one.

Hope you find what you're looking for :)
 

Theocat

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14 November 2010
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2,720
Years ago I was on a yard where one of the horses had come from a home that considered her danergous to ride. All the mare needed was a couple of hours work a day and she was an absolute dream - a riding school was perfect for becuase it kept her fit and busy; almost any private home would have struggled to give her enough work.
 
Joined
27 October 2011
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Lincs
I think we are quite a nice yard but then I'm a bit biased really. It's a bit old fashioned, but I quite like that, horses aren't worked insanely hard, have two days off and Saturday is their only full day, but they do get a couple of hours a day, a bit more on saturdays. just doesn't help we are looking for the kind of thing most people want... And that the owner has a preference for mares, and solid colours :p
Oh, and we are near Lincoln for the people that asked
 
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