Taking Digital Pulse

brighteyes

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Joined
13 August 2006
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11,406
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Well north of Watford
I know where to find it (the under the fetlock one) but how light or heavy a touch should you use when determining its intensity? If I press quite hard, I can get a good bounding one, whereas a moderate press gives a light flutter. Perhaps GT or HH might point me in the right direction??

Also wish to note that one (healthy) pony has a pulse strength at this testing point which would indicate near death from foot trouble in two of my others! Good idea to check everyone (temp, resp and DP)when they are well, then you will know when they aren't.
 

GTs

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25 March 2005
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5,072
I tend to press lightly.

As you said it is a good idea to become familiar with your horses when they are healthy - but I would not worry to much about these things - worrying ruins owning horses.
 

brighteyes

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13 August 2006
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Well north of Watford
Hello again! I'm afraid I have to worry as my little gp pony now has a touch of laminitis. Crisis management prevails at the moment. I was not responsible for predisposing her - the showing fraternity did that - but I have sucessfully fended off three inklings at the 'get go' and am constantly vigilant on her behalf. I took my eye off the ball with the smelly snot and snoring thing. I'm already pretty down with beating myself up about the gp infection - like I could have prevented it! - and worrying is what I do best. Mind you, she ran off at speed and wouldn't let me dose her this morning in my comfy sand arena, which means she's not that sore. Almost time to worry about the mega vet's bill I am about to run up as she's going for treatment soon. Thanks for the continuing help and advice GTs.
 
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8 August 2006
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You should press with a light to medium pressure. Never use your thumb as this has it's own strong pulse. The same with the fingers, if you press to hard you may be feeling partly your own pulse. Definately become familiar with your horse. What's normal for one is not normal for another.
 
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