Talk to me about....appaloosas

Pearlsasinger

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This whole is it a breed or colour question I think comes from Appaloosa being bred to all sorts, and nothing wrong with that at all, in fact I like it, but the characteristics of an Appaloosa (to my mind) become diluted.

That 'old' film of palo's was very nice as regards the native Americans, but those horses were not what I would consider Appaloosas. They are curvacesous, solid, and very QHy.

To me, the breed Appaloosa looks very different. They were scantish in many ways, not just in their manes and tails. Their conformation was more TB than anything else. I don't know what was in it, or how they originated or anything, but the Appaloosa of today I see in ads or in person or wherever is not what I consider an Appaloosa (breed) although every man and his/her dog calls them Appaloosa so, yes, maybe their colour comes from Appaloosas but maybe it comes from a different spotty.
I think you have missed the Appaloosas that were the foundation stock for BApS, they were mostly the Baroque shape, 'curvaceous and solid' describes them perfectly. The de Rivas' Klaus was an excellent example;
Appaloosa 'Klaus' | Horse and Hound Forum. Finer build stallions, such as 'Dances with Wolves' were introduced later. BApS was started in the 1970's, the ApHC was started in 2000 as a breakaway organisation.

I will say, sis and I didn't know what had hit us when we got our 1st Appaloosa mare, we had had a cob gelding before and she was like a completely differetn species. She was stubborn and claustrophobic, she was very nervous of large vehicles on narrow roads and she had such fixed ideas of what she was prepared to do. A yard move after the first 6 weeks helped enormously and we had her for the next 22 years. She decided that she was sister's horse, and insisted that I rode the mare we bought after her, who was her very best friend in all the world. She had a sense of humour, once poured a mouthful of water down the waistband of my jeans as I bent over in the stable, was clever - she let herself out of her stable unless we clipped a leadrope onto the bolt and incredibly athletic. Nobody ever fell off her, although in the beginning we often wished we could get off, she would walk off with her rider if she felt like it but never broke the gait you had asked her for. The subsequent Appys have also been sister's rides, with lots of character.
 
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I think you have missed the Appaloosas that were the foundation stock for BApS, they were mostly the Baroque shape, 'curvaceous and solid' describes them perfectly. The de Rivas' Klaus was an excellent example;
Appaloosa 'Klaus' | Horse and Hound Forum. Finer build stallions, such as 'Dances with Wolves' were introduced later. BApS was started in the 1970's, the ApHC was started in 2000 as a breakaway organisation.

I will say, sis and I didn't know what had hit us when we got our 1st Appaloosa mare, we had had a cob gelding before and she was like a completely differetn species. She was stubborn and claustrophobic, she was very nervous of large vehicles on narrow roads and she had such fixed ideas of what she was prepared to do. A yard move after the first 6 weeks helped enormously and we had her for the next 22 years. She decided that she was sister's horse, and insisted that I rode the mare we bought after her, who was her very best friend in all the world. She had a sense of humour, once poured a mouthful of water down the waistband of my jeans as I bent over in the stable, was clever - she let herself out of her stable unless we clipped a leadrope onto the bolt and incredibly athletic. Nobody ever fell off her, although in the beginning we often wished we could get off, she would walk off with her rider if she felt like it but never broke the gait you had asked her for. The subsequent Appys have also been sister's rides, with lots of character.
I can totally relate. My other horse that I've had to retire age 8 is a cob. Totally different species! But there is something about my Appy that makes me think there is a very loyal and special animal in there. I just have to convince her I'm worthy!! Which I didn't have to do with the cob!
She also doesn't like loud vehicles. I wonder if they are overly sensitive to sound as a trait?
 

Slightlyconfused

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I feel you! I have a 6 year old mix Appaloosa and he is a nightmare very stubborn won't walk forward sometimes or move out of the field and he wont even walk over a pole lol do you have any advice?

There is always a reason.

I agree testing for pssm and looking at others.
 

Pearlsasinger

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There is always a reason.

I agree testing for pssm and looking at others.
Our first one behaved very badly at first, she truly would only go where she wanted to go at the speed she decreed We did have a vet out, as she had a very snotty nose within the first month, but nothing serious was found. She improved as she got to know us and we learned how to work with her and following a yard move. I certainly wouldn't advise against testing for PSSM but don't be surprised if nothing is found. I do think she objected to our saddle, she needed a new 'teardrop' shaped one, which definitely helped, although we thought the original one fitted.
 

Errin Paddywack

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The de Rivas' Klaus was an excellent example;
Appaloosa 'Klaus' | Horse and Hound Forum. Finer build stallions, such as 'Dances with Wolves' were introduced later. BApS was started in the 1970's, the ApHC was started in 2000 as a breakaway organisation.
Klaus was a fabulous horse. I remember Ken and Desme buying him and seeing him for the first time at the National Show. He was out of a Knabstrup mare and by a TB stallion. He became a very good dressage horse with Anne de Rivaz. He went to the Wilmers when Ken and Desme gave up the stud. I wouldn't say Dance With Wolves was a lighter build than him, leggy and taller certainly but also imported and probably similar breeding. The stallion First Draft who was imported from USA was a lighter type and had huge influence on the breed. He was a grandson of Secretariat so was TB in type not Quarter horse type as so many imported appaloosas were.
 

Pinkvboots

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I used to ride an appaloosa mare years ago she was black and white lots of spots about 15h but very fine, she was a complete nutter although I did enjoy riding her she was incredibly fast and sharp I liked that back in the day, I remember she nearly knocked me out one day cantering on a grass track, she really bucked and then leapt in the air, and my face hit her neck as she leapt up, I was quite dazed and definitely saw stars that day.

He owner hardly ever rode her I think she was nervous of her which I could totally understand, they moved yards and I never saw her again I have often wondered what happened to her.
 

Spottyappy

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I remember Casanova, very nice horse. My boy was Tibertich Poncho, lost him as a 12 yr old due to enlarged heart. We had a lot of fun in those early days of appaloosa shows.
So sorry you lost your boy so young. I don’t recall him, but I do know there were quite a few nice Tibertich horses about at the time.
the shows were great, weren’t they. I often used to run youngsters for the stud, which Was great experience, as well as fun.
 

DabDab

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Klaus was a fabulous horse. I remember Ken and Desme buying him and seeing him for the first time at the National Show. He was out of a Knabstrup mare and by a TB stallion. He became a very good dressage horse with Anne de Rivaz. He went to the Wilmers when Ken and Desme gave up the stud. I wouldn't say Dance With Wolves was a lighter build than him, leggy and taller certainly but also imported and probably similar breeding. The stallion First Draft who was imported from USA was a lighter type and had huge influence on the breed. He was a grandson of Secretariat so was TB in type not Quarter horse type as so many imported appaloosas were.
I love your posts on the Spotty horses, you're just a fountain of knowledge. Thanks for taking the time to share
 

Lois Lame

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I think you have missed the Appaloosas that were the foundation stock for BApS, they were mostly the Baroque shape, 'curvaceous and solid' describes them perfectly. The de Rivas' Klaus was an excellent example;
Appaloosa 'Klaus' | Horse and Hound Forum. Finer build stallions, such as 'Dances with Wolves' were introduced later. BApS was started in the 1970's, the ApHC was started in 2000 as a breakaway organisation.
I had a quick look at that thread - someone said he was a Knabstrupper, not an Appaloosa. He's lovely. (I prefer him to an Appaloosa).

The Appaloosas I'm talking about were around in the 70s. These days, appaloosa seems to be a QH more than anything else. (ETA: Here. I don't know what you guys have over there.)

Same is true for the so-called Australian Stock Horse. There was a time when they looked like small TBs mostly. Now, a great many look (and are) QH.
 

Errin Paddywack

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The Appaloosas I'm talking about were around in the 70s. These days, appaloosa seems to be a QH more than anything else.
Those were the sort of appaloosas I like and used to breed although mine were the smaller ones. I really don't like the spotted Qtr horse types that a lot are now with very few exceptions.
This is one of the horses I bred, full brother to my stallion. I bred his mum as well.
tally_1.jpg
 

Rosietaz

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I always thought they were a colour rather than a breed until a friend bought a youngster. Then a couple of years later I snuggled a foal, got baby fever and bought a spotty youngster of my own 🤣
He has “human eyes”. Honestly they make me laugh as you don’t tend to see much of the whites until he’s looking/spooking at something and it just makes them look like stick on googley eyes! He’s a crossed with a Belgian warmblood so I think he’ll remain on the finer side.
 

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Milliechaz

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This is my appy x - mum was full appy and dad (we think) was Welsh. She is a character, very clever but very stubborn. Teaching her to long rein was interesting - just planted her feet. Teaching her to load is interesting - just plants her feet. She is very quick to learn though, as long as she wants to and is in the mood too. Only a baby at nearly 4.
 

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sportsmansB

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They are pretty much the only horses that I don't really like
Oh maybe friesans too

I can see the good in almost any horse but the spotty ones I know are all pretty useless, bad attitudes, not particularly talented, not very nice to look at
But thats just my opinion obvs.
 

Lois Lame

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And now to throw a cat amongst the pidgeons, after having bleated that Appaloosa is a breed. Perhaps it's more a type. (Whatever a 'type' is.) But it's colour is maybe different to the spotties and one of the many things that sets it apart.

I mean, can a spotty do what an Appaloosa can do, colour-wise? Is a spotty born a spotty, live as a spotty and perish as a spotty? Appaloosa does strange things, born as this, changing to that, doing as he pleases. EPL, I think it's called (having read about it here on H&H).

I wish the colouries would chime in. I don't think it's a clear cut thing about Appaloosa.
 

Btomkins

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And now to throw a cat amongst the pidgeons, after having bleated that Appaloosa is a breed. Perhaps it's more a type. (Whatever a 'type' is.) But it's colour is maybe different to the spotties and one of the many things that sets it apart.

I mean, can a spotty do what an Appaloosa can do, colour-wise? Is a spotty born a spotty, live as a spotty and perish as a spotty? Appaloosa does strange things, born as this, changing to that, doing as he pleases. EPL, I think it's called (having read about it here on H&H).

I wish the colouries would chime in. I don't think it's a clear cut thing about Appaloosa.
With all due respect, what are you on about?

Appaloosa is definitely a breed, with breed registries and recorded pedigrees. There is variation in type amongst the breed, as with many.

It’s just common for people to mistakenly call a spotted horse an Appaloosa automatically.
 

ycbm

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As the owner of a spotty this thread has been really interesting. I have always thought that as mine was born blanket spot that he must have actual Appaloosa in him somewhere. Am I right about that, or could his father's ability to throw a blanket spotted foal be just a colour thing not a breed thing? It doesn't make any difference, he's a lovely horse in every possible way, I'm just curious.
.
 

Rosietaz

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As the owner of a spotty this thread has been really interesting. I have always thought that as mine was born blanket spot that he must have actual Appaloosa in him somewhere. Am I right about that, or could his father's ability to throw a blanket spotted foal be just a colour thing not a breed thing? It doesn't make any difference, he's a lovely horse in every possible way, I'm just curious.
.
So one of the parents must have an LP gene somewhere I believe. That gene is most commonly in Appaloosas and Knabstruppers - so it’s most likely that your boy has either one of those in his breeding. Lp is a minefield though! 🤣
 

Rosietaz

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And now to throw a cat amongst the pidgeons, after having bleated that Appaloosa is a breed. Perhaps it's more a type. (Whatever a 'type' is.) But it's colour is maybe different to the spotties and one of the many things that sets it apart.

I mean, can a spotty do what an Appaloosa can do, colour-wise? Is a spotty born a spotty, live as a spotty and perish as a spotty? Appaloosa does strange things, born as this, changing to that, doing as he pleases. EPL, I think it's called (having read about it here on H&H).

I wish the colouries would chime in. I don't think it's a clear cut thing about Appaloosa.
I think you mean LP? I’m sure EPL is a brand of hair removers 🤣
 

tristar

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As the owner of a spotty this thread has been really interesting. I have always thought that as mine was born blanket spot that he must have actual Appaloosa in him somewhere. Am I right about that, or could his father's ability to throw a blanket spotted foal be just a colour thing not a breed thing? It doesn't make any difference, he's a lovely horse in every possible way, I'm just curious.
.
the spotted arxh comes from somewhere, mine has the spots,the attitude, the eyes, the xtra thing that spotties have so i think a breed of spotties is in there somewhere
 

spotty_pony

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They are pretty much the only horses that I don't really like
Oh maybe friesans too

I can see the good in almost any horse but the spotty ones I know are all pretty useless, bad attitudes, not particularly talented, not very nice to look at
But thats just my opinion obvs.
You'd hate it at mine then as we have a full Friesian and a part bred Appy! 😂 in all seriousness both breeds are not for everyone and require an experienced and kind home.
 

SEL

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And now to throw a cat amongst the pidgeons, after having bleated that Appaloosa is a breed. Perhaps it's more a type. (Whatever a 'type' is.) But it's colour is maybe different to the spotties and one of the many things that sets it apart.

I mean, can a spotty do what an Appaloosa can do, colour-wise? Is a spotty born a spotty, live as a spotty and perish as a spotty? Appaloosa does strange things, born as this, changing to that, doing as he pleases. EPL, I think it's called (having read about it here on H&H).

I wish the colouries would chime in. I don't think it's a clear cut thing about Appaloosa.
I think I get what you're asking!

So my mare has a double copy of the LP gene (I have tested) which means both parents must have carried at least one copy of it and therefore be some form of spotted horse. They've found LP/LP in horse DNA dating back to pre domestication so I'm guessing the colour combinations that fall under 'appaloosa' have always been in horses.

Her sire was a spotted draft so he definitely wouldn't fit the breed standard for Appaloosa. Lovely boy but built like a brick outhouse. Her dam was probably Appaloosa - certainly the right build - but was rescued without paperwork and died shortly after giving birth so we'll never know.

Colour wise my mare (varnish roan snowcap) and her parents (1 x leopard spot and 1 x varnish roan) are no different to a tonne of registered Appaloosa horses, but physically the sire wouldn't fit the breed characteristic and so I tend to describe my mare as a part bred.
 

Errin Paddywack

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The first spotties are recorded in cave paintings, obviously they weren't known as appaloosa. The thing is with spotties that they all have the characteristics, spotty skin, white sclera and striped feet. Often the sparse mane and tail as well. Their coats seem to be slightly different too, hard to explain but it was one of the first things I noticed about the first spotty I ever met. He was bought as a 3 yr old by the RS I had just started work at and was bred by Louis Massarella. He was into spotted breeding at the time and a member of the British Spotted Horse and Pony Society. I still have copies of a lot of their breed registers. Not many animals had much recorded breeding then. That Society split in 1976 and two separate societies were formed. The British Spotted Pony Society and the British Appaloosa Society. There was very little American Appaloosa breeding back then and what there was was usually from American horses who used to be quarantined here on their way to Australia and earned their keep while they were here. Lots of Knabstrup breeding too in the early days, some from circus horses that got left here and in Ireland too. I seem to remember reading somewhere that there was a strain of spotted welsh ponies at one time. Some Lippizaners too had spots going back a long way.
This has resulted in many different types. In England we mostly bred the more sport horse type which I like but gradually more and more American horses have come in and now the Quarter horse type is seen a lot.
 

freckles22uk

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I’ve had Appaloosas over 20 years now. Though I only own one now a home bred gelding, I kept him as a stallion until he was 10 (when I moved back to the UK from Spain) and he’s always been a big softy. His mum was very opinionated but intelligent and lovely natured. But I’ll sadly lost her as she went blind. They can be a very “one person” type of horse.
I’ve bred 2 solid bay foals. Both from the same parents. Harley the one I have now and a leopard mare.
My daughter has 2 both with different personalities. Even though they are mum and son.
I actually like the white of the eyes though my lad also has a blue eye.
F85F9718-EB17-4E57-AA0B-52306AE10405.jpeg
 

ycbm

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Yes, lots I think, but I believe it has to come from both parents and thankfully mine can't have that. I did worry about it.
.
 

SEL

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Is there any predisposition to night blindness in the Appaloosa?
Yes - but they need two copies of the LP gene so you need a spotty type as both parents. Two copies of the LP gene means no spots so fewspots and snowcaps will be nightblind

Appaloosas (& appaloosa colouring if not the breed :p) do seem to be more susceptible to uveitis, which might be what the vet meant. I'm not sure if that is down to the white in the eyes or a genetic hitch, but mine does wear a UV mask for most of the year in turnout.
 

Rosietaz

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Yes - but they need two copies of the LP gene so you need a spotty type as both parents. Two copies of the LP gene means no spots so fewspots and snowcaps will be nightblind

Appaloosas (& appaloosa colouring if not the breed :p) do seem to be more susceptible to uveitis, which might be what the vet meant. I'm not sure if that is down to the white in the eyes or a genetic hitch, but mine does wear a UV mask for most of the year in turnout.
Interesting, so nightblindness wouldn’t be something I would need to worry about for mine? (Sire was a spotty but dam was a warmblood?)
I worry about his eyes so he’s in a UV mask most days
 

spotty_pony

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Mine is prone to allergies (pollen) and burns on his neck but not his pink nose! i've just bought him a UV rug to save having to constantly put sun block on his neck. Anyone else's like this?
 

ycbm

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Mine is prone to allergies (pollen) and burns on his neck but not his pink nose! i've just bought him a UV rug to save having to constantly put sun block on his neck. Anyone else's like this?
Mine has an almost hairless chest in summer, I'm pretty sure he would burn if the sun got to it.
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