tendon sheath adhesions - experiences?

noblesteed

Well-Known Member
Joined
3 August 2009
Messages
1,872
Location
Up North
Hi
My semi-retired hacking horse had an op recently for a couple of things and one of them was tenoscopy on a tendon sheath to remove adhesions. The vet said unfortunately he couldn't remove all the adhesions and so the horse might never come sound, but to try anyway. Currently 2 months into rehab - we are box resting and walking out up to 20 mins twice a day. Horse is doing ok. Vet came out last week to inject the tendon sheath and said he's 2/10 lame but compared to 4/10 after his op so this is an improvement.
The issue I have is that he was 2/10 lame in that leg before his op due to arthritis. So the fact that he is now 'back' to 2/10 seems to me a positive thing. The vet will scan and nerve block next month to see how the tendon sheath is doing and make a decision on whether horse can be turned out/work increased or whether box rest must continue.

HOWEVER the fact that he still has adhesions within the sheath means I am rather worried. Given that vets do so often tell you the worst case scenario, are there any other peeople out there with horses who have returned to reasonable soundness with adhesions/scar tissue present? And have they been sound enough for ridden work or just field retirement?
Or am I wasting my time hoping the vet might be wrong and to prepare for the worst?
 

applecart14

Well-Known Member
Joined
12 March 2010
Messages
6,270
Location
Solihull, West Mids
My horse had a slight sprain on his suspensory branch on his near fore and the vet xrayed at the time and found some sort of calcifcation floating around and thinks that is why he has a slight hop on the right rein due to a mechanically lame type of situation, the horses leg does not have full range of movement that it should do. He's not in pain with it, when he was on a bute trial it was still evident. I suppose its scar tissue which prevents the full range of movement. Now its very rare to see the hop at all out so it is a loads better than it was.

I do dressage tests and the judges never comment and watch my friend ride him and don't notice so I think its safe to say its completely gone now. Soemtimes if you trot too fast is is noticeable on the odd day. Doesn't cause him any pain.

None of the shockwave treatments worked at the time and the vet said he didn't know if it would effect him, and if it did to what degree. Said it couldn't be removed surgically (I wouldn't do this to him anyway) because they have removed these type of things on cadavers and ended up taking half the branch away with them.
 
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