The EMS (?) Native, the clip and the rug... help please

HeresHoping

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My Connie is being clipped today. She has grown her winter woollies fit for the northern climes and the weather has not been obliging. We're currently enjoying 15 degrees and a light breeze. This means she is getting absolutely soaked after 40 minutes in the school. Not an issue at weekends but on weekdays I am on a tight schedule and can't really afford the time to hang around waiting for her to dry off so I can rug her if the temperature does decide it's going to drop below the magic 8. Which it has a few times since the middle of September.

Why was I even thinking about rugging a hairy? Well, she's an ex broodmare who gets a little stiff with the start of arthritis and possibly insulin resistance (she's 16 and not tested yet - we just note that there's a marked improvement in her hind end movement when the grass grows green). The vet has suggested that although she was negative for Cushings, she should be managed as though she does have some sort of insulin issue (who wouldn't after 5 foals?), so keeping her warm when she comes in at night and keeping her exercised at least 6 days a week is a given.

I shall give her a blanket clip this afternoon. I've not clipped her previously but feel this is probably best.

I have a 100g no neck stable rug, but obviously this clip will give her a naked neck. Should I get the same weight with a neck for the next month or so? Or should I go straight to the 200g with a neck and just whack this on when it drops below 4?

Hmmm. Please help me decide. Everything turnout I have has a neck apart from the lightweight so not worried about that.
 

ihatework

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Leave her without a neck!!
Honestly, my lot only get necks on in really cold/wet weather.
I truely believe 'we' overuse necks - if a horse gets a bit hot under rug, at least there is some surface area exposed to help them regulate temp.
And even a clipped horse has a certain amount hair left.
Not many humans around in balaclavas and gloves at the moment ....
 

be positive

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I hardly ever use a rug with a neck in the stable as I find unless the weather is seriously cold they are fine without and can get very much hotter with the neck covered up, a bit like us wearing a hat it keeps the heat in too much and they don't have the ability to take it off, I would start with the lightweight and see how she is after the first night she will have the main parts covered to help her circulation and muscles stay plenty warm enough, years ago we never had neck covers and horses were fine fully clipped.
 

HeresHoping

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Thank you so much! No need to go on a shopping spree, then. I have a wide variety of neck-less stable rugs for Northern climes, only one of which she's actually used since we've been up here as the Northern winter has yet to materialise.:D

It was the 'keep her warm when stabled' advice from the vet that was causing the wibble. :eek:

Plenty of humans in balaclavas and gloves around here... usually following the hunt :eek3::rolleyes3:
 

Pinkvboots

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I wouldn't bother with neck rugs my two Arabs are fully clipped apart from legs and I hardly ever use neck rugs, they are never cold and hold there weight well through winter so I really wouldn't worry about a native being without one.
 

meleeka

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I don’t bother with necks either. When you think about it, their bellies aren’t covered by rugs and they are naked. I think as long as the back is warm they are ok. My old mare is loads better with stable bandages on to help her arthritis.
 

Pinkvboots

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I don’t bother with necks either. When you think about it, their bellies aren’t covered by rugs and they are naked. I think as long as the back is warm they are ok. My old mare is loads better with stable bandages on to help her arthritis.
that is a good idea about covering the legs in winter my mare had hock arthritis and I used to leave a very soft pair of old travel boots on her overnight they kept her legs lovely and warm.
 

ester

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mum likes to put no fill turnout necks on but I tend not to bother, and definitely not a stable rug. I acquired one off a friend with a neck and its not yet been cold enough in the last 3 years of him being blanket clipped to bother.
 

stencilface

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Can I ask why there's a marked improvement in hind end movement wheb the grass grows green? Isn't it always green? Please explain as if I'm a child :D
 

HeresHoping

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Can I ask why there's a marked improvement in hind end movement wheb the grass grows green? Isn't it always green? Please explain as if I'm a child :D
As MoC says, our grass loses quite a lot in terms of nutrients over winter. I suspect her better movement is to do with the massive increase in Vitamin E/copper/all the other stuff in the grass that helps with muscle repair, etc. that we get in the Spring.

I supplement her in winter but I don't often get to work her as much so I suspect she is not metabolising everything very efficiently.

I was also being a bit whimsy and hoping you'd infer that she is better off when it's warm
 

stencilface

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Thankyou. I was trying to find the link between better movement, green grass and possibly hind gut acidosis, but normally movement is worse with better grass in that instance, so the opposite of what you said! Thats why i was confused, just that my boys movement has improved since the grass growth dropped off a cliff, or it could be that the devil's claw is kicking in. Who knows!

Our grass is most definitely still green too!
 
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