They say never meet your childhood hero....

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I watched a clinic/demo by her a number of years ago and was underwhelmed by it but talking to people like that is appalling.

As to the sj husband of an event rider, I'm pretty certain I know who is being referred to here. My son had a lesson with him once and it was dire. We saw him teach the same lesson for three different groups, no adjustments made for different levels of ability, comments just constantly repeated with no explanations and just a complete lack of enthusiasm. His wife was doing flatwork lessons the same day and was much more engaged with the riders.

On the other hand, some big names have been absolutely fantastic, lovely people that were really encouraging and helpful. Ones that particularly stick out were Blyth Tait and Christopher Bartle who even took time out when we saw him at an event to ask how things were going and offer further advice.
Mark Todd always seems very pleasant. I've said hello to him a few times when walking a course and always found him friendly
I've never had a lesson with him but he comes across as a nice person.
 

Baywonder

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That is absolutely shocking behaviour. :eek:

Mark Todd always seems very pleasant.
I have also met mark Todd - and yes, he is a lovely guy.

Harvey Smith, however, was a different kettle of fish. As a young girl, I asked him politely for his autograph. He pulled a face and said "I haven't got time for that" and stomped off.

Malcolm Pyrah, Nick Skelton and David Broome were all lovely too. :)
 

MuddyMonster

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That's really sad :( I'm glad your writing to her - as someone with a disabled family member, I'm afraid 'being' LG doesn't excuse that. I'm probably not as surprised as I thought I would be - I generally really enjoy her commentating but there were a couple of things she said at the Olympics/Euro's that were a bit close to the wind, or not what I'd expect - and that was knowing they were on the TV!

There was another big name SJ-er whose rudeness I once witnessed in a demo/clinic staggered me. Ironically, they later went on to complain about the rudeness of another big name rider and how unprofessional they were - whilst explaining how much of a professional they themselves were ...

Mind you, after a couple of my own experience's, I've come to the conclusion that what I think some professionals in the equine industry think of as being 'professional', can be very different to professionalism in other business or places of work ... 🤷‍♀️
 

NinjaPony

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Completely unacceptable behaviour and language, in any context. Definitely complain to the venue, as a professional she should be held up to the bare minimum standards of behaviour eg don’t use highly offensive slurs! Being ‘old-fashioned’ is absolutely not excuse. Sorry you had such a bad experience and thank you for warning anyone else who might not otherwise have known.
 

LegOn

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I think professionals get bored of teaching/clinics really easily because of their addiction to adrenaline but then if you are that fed up, stop taking peoples money & insulting them... that is completely unacceptable.

I did a few eventing clinics a good few years ago and it was just disappointing to see the whole lesson taken up with the ego of the 'professional' - when there was a tricky horse, they wanted nothing more than to hop up & 'show it who was boss' & it was cringe & upsetting to watch. Typically I found this more of the men.. but a few of the woman also who had chips on their shoulder. :rolleyes:
 

palo1

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I thought about this but I don't know who to? She is so popular....does no one just talk about their real experiences and think they must have had a marvellous time because of who she is? Or blank out or make excuses for the language like that?
Could you send a message to the organisers or even to her explaining, as tactfully as is appropriate, your experience and feelings about it? Perhaps no-one has ever raised this with her (they should have done and she should certainly know better in fact) - a direct approach sometimes makes a huge difference. It is pretty appalling to hear that kind of stuff tbh but I understand how difficult it is to respond at the time. With practice or training that CAN be done but as you know, when it is someone you have always admired that makes it far harder.
 

Winters100

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I am surprised that there was anyone left to teach by the end of the lesson. That sort of language would see me leave the clinic and demand a refund. Being old school is not an excuse, growing up in the 80s it was used by some as a derisive term, but one would not expect to hear it from an adult, and as children it was certainly not a word that we were allowed to use. She should know better, and if she does not then she should not be teaching anyone.
 

Chianti

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That is absolutely shocking behaviour. :eek:



I have also met mark Todd - and yes, he is a lovely guy.

Harvey Smith, however, was a different kettle of fish. As a young girl, I asked him politely for his autograph. He pulled a face and said "I haven't got time for that" and stomped off.

Malcolm Pyrah, Nick Skelton and David Broome were all lovely too. :)
Many years ago I went to a Harvey Smith demo at the riding school where a friend had lessons. The centre had a club - with a bar. Smith was very late to start and had obviously enjoyed making use of the bar. He was quite p....d and sat and mumbled his way through a question and answer session. Then got on a horse and jumped about 2' - to ironic applause. We left at that point.
 

poiuytrewq

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She’s a rather eccentric lady and you can get different versions of her. Very disappointing and really not acceptable, ever, but especially so in recent times where we have a whole new level of awareness.

Im still ashamed of a nickname I used to call an old horse of mine a number of years back. Didn’t think anything of it at the time, but I’m embarrassed now!
You hit a nail on the head there though haven’t you?
Years ago we all used the odd bit of language that we didn’t think anything of.
Now we know better. Or should know better.
 

Red-1

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Recently bought into cob culture.
I did the BHS Instructor of the Year competition one year. TBH, because it was cheaper than a CPD day.

The judge spent ages telling us how wonderful he was, then sat coffee housing with one of the finalists, then told us how his wonderful yard had to have the window l**kers once a week.

I was furious and wanted to make a complaint to the BHS. However, as I didn't 'win' (the friend who was coffee housing did - she probably should have but it was really unprofessional the way it was done) I felt that the BHS would put it down to sour grapes. TBH, I didn't care who 'won' as I was there for the CPD.

I vowed never to visit their particular 'wonderful' centre though.

BTW., I did do a Lucinda Green clinic once, it was fabulous. Low fences but very complex. Nothing said out of order.
 

Colivet

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Malcolm Pyrah, Nick Skelton and David Broome were all lovely too.
No personal experience of Nick Skelton, but attended a training session with David Broome who was lovely, positive, funny and educational. Observed a clinic with Malcolm Pyrah who was teaching riders how to rap their horses and at a dinner later that evening found him bored, boring and frankly hard work
 

Sandstone1

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No personal experience of Nick Skelton, but attended a training session with David Broome who was lovely, positive, funny and educational. Observed a clinic with Malcolm Pyrah who was teaching riders how to rap their horses and at a dinner later that evening found him bored, boring and frankly hard work
Many years ago at The Royal show, my friend asked Malcolm Pyrah for his autograph and was told no in a very rude way.
 

tiga71

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That is quite shocking. A friend went to her clinic yesterday so I will ask her how she found it.

A few years ago I 'won' a few lessons with big names. It was on charity auctions and I figured it was the only was I could do anything horsey through the business.

I had a private jump lesson with Trevor Breen. Very good. He was lovely, as was his wife. I also had a private lesson with Christopher Burton. That was great too. He was really helpful and got my cob and us jumping a 1.15 fence at the end of a grid. Never been so happy! I have also done a few Chris Burton clinics and found him very good in those too.
I also did a Gemma Tattersal clinic which was good but a bit too much 'make him go' for my sensitive young horse. Not awful by any means but I think we were a bit green for it at the time.

For a while I was very into going to clinics with the big names, have done some others but can't remember who. But I now realise I get more out of my trusted trainers with a few different clinics from time to time.
 
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Not at all surprised, Tim Stockdale was the worst of the bunch, Ellen Whittaker a waste of money. The only one how was remotely helpful was Geoff Billington
I bumped into Tim at hoys one year as a teenager. I was so excited to see him and asked for his autograph and he point blank ignored me and walked away. I know they're busy and probably get hassled a lot but it doesn’t warrant being rude.
 
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Just because you can do, doesn’t mean you can teach. I am actually worse at teaching the things which come naturally to me as I can’t tell you why, the steps to or how I have done what I have done.. as I’ve just done it and found it easy. So I don’t blame some of them on that front, no excuse for just being a d*ck though
 
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That is quite shocking. A friend went to her clinic yesterday so I will ask her how she found it.

A few years ago I 'won' a few lessons with big names. It was on charity auctions and I figured it was the only was I could do anything horsey through the business.

I had a private jump lesson with Trevor Breen. Very good. He was lovely, as was his wife. I also had a private lesson with Christopher Burton. That was great too. He was really helpful and got my cob and us jumping a 1.15 fence at the end of a grid. Never been so happy! I have also done a few Chris Burton clinics and found him very good in those too.
I also did a Gemma Tattersal clinic which was good but a bit too much 'make him go' for my sensitive young horse. Not awful by any means but I think we were a bit green for it at the time.

For a while I was very into going to clinics with the big names, have done some others but can't remember who. But I now realise I get more out of my trusted trainers with a few different clinics from time to time.
I'll be interested to hear what your friend thought and if anything inappropriate was said in her session.
 

twobearsarthur

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Years ago I dragged my extremely non horsey husband to a Jeanette Brakewell clinic. Afterwards he decided to go ask for her autograph, ending up drinking champagne with her and talking about retraining racehorses she indulged him and he dined out on the story in our “horsey circles” for years after. The tale always began “That sounds like the time Jeanette… you know Jeanette Brakewell and I were discussing retraining racehorses over champagne” She has more patience than I do put it that way lol
 

twobearsarthur

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Many of you won't agree but the word used is in my daily vocabulary and I say it with no Malice, I bet it's the same with her
Would you use the N word or homophobic slurs? That’s how bad that word is. Just because you don’t mean any malice doesn’t mean it isn’t extraordinarily offensive and to be honest that isn’t an excuse for using such a derogatory hateful word in any context.
 

ycbm

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Not at all surprised, Tim Stockdale was the worst of the bunch, Ellen Whittaker a waste of money. The only one how was remotely helpful was Geoff Billington

Tim Stockdale was absolutely lovely and gave me an hour of his time and a complete tour of his yard for free when I took a horse to him to assess for top level competition. Geoff Billington was really funny and fun and useful to train with, but he was also the one who was rude about one of the riders that I mentioned above. The worst lessons I ever had from a top rider were with xxxxxx edited as I see he is still teaching - an old time Olympic rider who I had really respected.
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Would you use the N word or homophobic slurs? That’s how bad that word is. Just because you don’t mean any malice doesn’t mean it isn’t extraordinarily offensive and to be honest that isn’t an excuse for using such a derogatory hateful word in any context.
I'm gay so no and am not easily offended so couldn't care less with tbh. Most gay people will use what others think of as offensive words to describe each other same as people of colour. 95% of people on here are way to sensitive
 
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Would you use the N word or homophobic slurs? That’s how bad that word is. Just because you don’t mean any malice doesn’t mean it isn’t extraordinarily offensive and to be honest that isn’t an excuse for using such a derogatory hateful word in any context.
🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣
 

ycbm

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I'm gay so no and am not easily offended so couldn't care less with tbh. Most gay people will use what others think of as offensive words to describe each other same as people of colour. 95% of people on here are way to sensitive
That comparison would only apply if you yourself had cerebral palsy and were talking about yourself or others with cerebral palsy who you knew would not be offended.

It is simply not an acceptable term for anyone else to use.

I agree with you that people are often too sensitive, but this isn't one of those times.
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