This bit for a young horse?

SkewbyTwo

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I like it. I have never seen one like it before, but there is nothing to dislike about it. Looks a bit odd, but everything there is kind, soft, and designed to promote interest and I have to say, having recently bought a salox bit, I am now a believer in materials causing salivation! I think it's thought out and ideal for, a youngster.
 

dreamcometrue

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To be honest I was a bit shocked when I saw it. The main part is quite knobbly and the part that attaches to the bit rings is strange too. I think it has far too much going on.

When we saw him ridden he was very much on the contact, perhaps a little more than you would expect from such a green horse.
 

kassieg

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Depends on which way it is used.
1 way it is really quite strong the other way less so but still stronger than a normal snaffle I certainly wouldn't use it
However if the horse likes the copper try a loose ring sweet iron with a copper lozange :) I have my 5 year old in it & she loves it
 

ILuvCowparsely

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We have just bought a young ISH, recently broken in. He is currently in this bit.

http://www.thehorsebitshop.co.uk/product.php?xProd=343&xSec=4

Has anyone used one of these before? It isn't one I have come across. Is it okay for a young horse?

Thanks

Personally I would not use a bit like that on a recently broken in youngster. I would choose something plain and simple no fangled gadgets I like mine in a plain snaffle eggbut one. Something he can relax in and be comfortable in rather than , this one which is says something to give the horse to think about or a horse with a "fussy tongue".


You want a bit which the horse accepts, is not to much for the mouth to cope with, not to strong, or is used for an issue like this portrays to be for. I would take this off his bridle and go back to a basic plain bit, I found the bit bank very helpful for certain issues.

I personally feel this is like putting a teenager in a Ferrari, a bit to much for his experience.


I start mine in a rubber snaffle or a happy mouth or a simple eggbut snafle
 
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Spring Feather

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It's a western bit. I can't see a problem with using it. Copper is a nice metal for youngsters and the rollers often help the horse to seek the bit. I'm not a big fan of loose ring snaffles however so I'd be looking for similar but with different cheeks personally.
 

dreamcometrue

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Thanks for your thoughts.

I use a Mylers comfort snaffle for my mare and I am inclined to try him in one of those. Just hoping that he is as sweet and docile as we thought!
 

pennyturner

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I use this bit on my young NF stallion. He was broken in a simple snaffle, but clearly didn't like the single joint, and tended to point his nose up and out rather than engage. As a result, his way of going wasn't relaxed, and he felt strong sometimes, because he was resisting.

He LOVES this bit. Turns towards me when he sees the bridle and reaches down for it, gives it a big slurpy chomp before settling beautifully. It's reversible, so we don't use the ridged side. The rings work like keys to encourage a youngster to mouth and salivate, although now he's had it a while, I don't think they're doing much. Every horse is different, but for my boy this bit has him carrying himself naturally on a light contact, which he clearly enjoys. He's not at all 'strong' now. The children can, and do ride him.

It is a gentle bit, so will not give you lots of 'control', but encourages the horse to seek the bit and yield politely.
 

pip6

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I know someone who used simillar in young (big) horse, went nicely in it. Personally though I like to start in fulmers, as they can't slip through if they try to play with the bit & help guide them gently. Current youngster in fulmer.
 
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