Thoughts on payment for schooling etc?

Hepsibah

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My five year old mare is ready to start her ridden career properly now after being started at three then lightly schooled, taken over small jumps and hacked out at four then turned away over winter. Trouble is, she is currently living in what can only be described as a semi-swamp, semi-muddy field with no access to the yard as it has been dug up to install new drains and the almost constant rain is hampering the installation. So, I am thinking of asking a young rider friend of mine if she would take her on at the yard she keeps her horse to tidy her up and bring her back into work, hacking, schooling and jumping. The lady in question is nineteen and a good rider with experience of bringing on youngsters successfully although she doesn't do it in any professional capacity. When she schooled her last year for me at my yard, I paid her £20ph which included travel to my yard.
What do you think would be a reasonable payment to offer per week, not including livery (but possibly turn out, muck out and feed) and what should I expect for my money in your opinion?
 

WelshD

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I've paid £70 per week for a non professional and £115 a week for a professional, full livery plus schooling. Small ponies though.
 

ILuvCowparsely

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My five year old mare is ready to start her ridden career properly now after being started at three then lightly schooled, taken over small jumps and hacked out at four then turned away over winter. Trouble is, she is currently living in what can only be described as a semi-swamp, semi-muddy field with no access to the yard as it has been dug up to install new drains and the almost constant rain is hampering the installation. So, I am thinking of asking a young rider friend of mine if she would take her on at the yard she keeps her horse to tidy her up and bring her back into work, hacking, schooling and jumping. The lady in question is nineteen and a good rider with experience of bringing on youngsters successfully although she doesn't do it in any professional capacity. When she schooled her last year for me at my yard, I paid her £20ph which included travel to my yard.
What do you think would be a reasonable payment to offer per week, not including livery (but possibly turn out, muck out and feed) and what should I expect for my money in your opinion?
Sounds a lot to me for someone who is not a proffessional

here we have two trainers ( not including me )

one is BHSAI but rides and is trained by NIcola Mcgiven so very good rider she charges £ 15 per half hr inc her travel - catching horse in - riding and tacking up - turning back out
the other is BHSII does not rider only teaches 45 mins £ 18

this is per time you must understand
You have to think of livery too so will work out a lot
 

Farma

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I pay £40 an hour for a pro so £20 seems reasonable, if she isn't a pro I would be a little concerned about the insurance side of things tbh!
 

ILuvCowparsely

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I pay £40 an hour for a pro so £20 seems reasonable, if she isn't a pro I would be a little concerned about the insurance side of things tbh!

:shock: £ 40.............. round here with BHSII is £ 18 per 45 mins. Is your trainer higher than an II?
 

ILuvCowparsely

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Must admit i would not use anyone who was not trained paying that amount, maybe £10 if they were good and rode well themselves to a certain level but just a freind no I would not pay £ 20. I did pay a livery to ride my horse while I was recovering from a humerus fracture but I paid £ 10 max
 

smellsofhorse

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Sounds a lot to me for someone who is not a proffessional

here we have two trainers ( not including me )

one is BHSAI but rides and is trained by NIcola Mcgiven so very good rider she charges £ 15 per half hr inc her travel - catching horse in - riding and tacking up - turning back out
the other is BHSII does not rider only teaches 45 mins £ 18

this is per time you must understand
You have to think of livery too so will work out a lot

Where about are you, as those prices seem far too cheap!
 

ihatework

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I couldn't get a decent pro rider to school for £18, letters after name mean nothing to me.

That said I wouldn't be paying an inexperience, but good, teenager much to ride. Probably £10, but would top it up with paying for training on top
 
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Farma

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:shock: £ 40.............. round here with BHSII is £ 18 per 45 mins. Is your trainer higher than an II?

I wouldn't hire someone on the back of those qualifications even though I've done them myself to work as an instructor.
Whilst I've been pregnant I've had 2 riders I hire to school my horse and simply hired them as I've seen them ride to a high level with compassion for the horses they ride and that's all I was interested in.
These type of riders are so rare and so in demand they can warrant a higher price, I could hire numerous bhs instructors for £20 but I don't know any that could do the job I want.
 

horsebenny

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I pay a professional £30 for 45mins and yes he has proper BHS qualifications as well as being a good and sympathetic rider.
 

Asha

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Qualifications are the last thing I would look at when paying someone to school my horses. To me, it means nothing.

I look at competition record , if they have a good one, then I'd go to watch them compete, and watch how they school other horses. Plus it's a small world we live in. Word of mouth is very useful.

As for what's a fair price, I'd say it depends on what level they compete. For a real pro, £30 + for 45mins . You get what you pay for.
 

ILuvCowparsely

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Qualifications are the last thing I would look at when paying someone to school my horses. To me, it means nothing.

I look at competition record , if they have a good one, then I'd go to watch them compete, and watch how they school other horses. Plus it's a small world we live in. Word of mouth is very useful.

As for what's a fair price, I'd say it depends on what level they compete. For a real pro, £30 + for 45mins . You get what you pay for.
Now why did I spend all that time and money training and qualifying, when I could just have gone out had lessons and then gone out teaching lol. Seriously your talking about top class eventers / competitors who have spend loads of money to get where they are. Been trained to a high level or riding, not just a person who may ride ok and expects £ 20 to ride a horse. It also depends IMO on what they are doing with this horse in the school, are they just sitting on it an general walk trot/canter or are they working to a program which the horse is on and furthering its schooling.
OP just said someone she knows who is good that depends of their definition of good.
 
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Hepsibah

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Well good for me is not neccessarily good for everyone. My chosen rider has experience bringing on youngsters to be novice rides. She has sympathetic hands and is kind but doesn't take any nonsense. I feel she is ideal to bring on a youngster to be a family pony. I don't really require a top rider for that.
 

Crackerz

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BHS quals mean nothing to me either, i go for experience and what i have seen both at competition and home.

You can't have a semi private RC lesson here for less than £25, so I would imagine £35+for a pro schooling would be a good starter.
 

Ceriann

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I'm paying 150 a week for mine to be ridden 6 days a week and on full livery. She will be a nice solid and safe all rounder but no competition prospect so they've focussed on a bit of everything with her.
 

shadowboy

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To do exactly the same as what you've asked last September I paid £135 a week for 6 days a week. This was an event rider competing to intermediate 2*/advanced. He had excellent facilities and a superb manner. If the rider is competent and a good manner with young horses qualifications are irrelevant.
 

webble

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To do exactly the same as what you've asked last September I paid £135 a week for 6 days a week. This was an event rider competing to intermediate 2*/advanced. He had excellent facilities and a superb manner. If the rider is competent and a good manner with young horses qualifications are irrelevant.

Completely agree. I have seen a couple of people with high BHS qualifications that I wouldnt let near my horse, I even told one to stop what they were doing and step away
 
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