Tipping forwards in trot

AFB

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Can anybody suggest typical reasons for tipping forwards in the trot?

I got my OH to take some photo's video's of me schooling yesterday and I'm horrendously tipped forwards. Halt and canter I look to be nicely straight but my trot work was horrendous and has left me feeling very disheartened! (He didn't talk any of walk work, apparently that's not exciting enough to be video/photo worthy :D)

I've been having physio & taking pilates classes to correct my asymetric wonkiness and I'm due another visit, so will discuss with her too, but wondered if anybody can suggest any obvious reasons I may be doing so, and any tips/exercises to help me sit up straight?

I've put a little bit of weight on recently so I'm also slightly worried it may be my saddle now tipping me forwards, but if so wouldn't that affect me at all paces? Also it's not a massive amount, enough for my clothes to be rather snug but they still fit me.

Any hints/tips well received...
 

JillA

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I'd put money on the fact that you are looking down? And rounding your shoulders?
A good tip I was given years ago (in the days of hats with rigid peaks) was tip your hat forward over your eyes, then you HAVE to look up to see where you are going. And the imaginary coat hanger across your shoulders inside your outer wear is another good one. Then, along with all of that, concentrate on your pelvis swinging forward and over the front of the saddle rather than your upper body. Good luck
 

SpringArising

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Tipping forwards in trot is probably my worst riding habit, so I feel you.

My best tip is to sit far enough back that you feel like you look stupid. Once you're doing that, you're probably in the right position!

It takes a few rides to get used to it, mind.
 

Casey76

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If you’re sitting straight up when rising to the trot you will be behind the movement, and almost certain all rising from your feet instead of your pelvis.
 

wkiwi

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Try doing rising trot without stirrups, and with the inside hand on the cantle of the saddle. Rise as little amount as possible: only rise as much as the horse throws you up.
 

YorksG

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I know I recomend this for almost all trot problems in riders :D but try rising trot without irons, this means that you rise from your calves, rather than your feet. Another one to try is standing up in your irons , first in walk and then in trot.
 

sarahann1

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Think John Travolta Greece style thrust movements with your hips when you're rising, not a straight up and down movement.
 

BBP

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Saddle may be putting you in a bad position, they can contribute a lot towards tipping.

For me, it’s right hip flexors and lower back muscles and weak glutes and abs causing an anterior pelvic tilt. If your muscles are pulling your pelvis into an anterior tilt then no matter how hard you try to lift your head and bring your shoulders back etc you still won’t be able to stop tipping forwards and you will just end up with a sore back. Combo of osteopathy and stretches has made a miraculous difference to how I sit (for me I tip more in canter than trot) and made me feel more supple in general. Do you work at a desk a lot for a living? People who spend a lot of their day sitting often develop this sort of posture and it’s tough to fight it when in the saddle.
 

AFB

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Thanks for all the responses, having looked back at the photo's I am looking down in the majority of the trot ones, wheras I'm not in the canter, however my shoulders really don't look too bad (I expected them too as I'm terrible for rounding them generally) - hopefully this could be an easy fix (wishful thinking I imagine).

BBP - I do work at a desk so could well be issues similar to those you've mentioned too, I'll discuss with physio as previous treatments have all been related to asymmetry - possibly something new I've developed to compensate.

Saddle is also due a check from horses POV so will see what saddler says RE fit to me. Really hope it's not that as it's really not in the budget to buy a new saddle at the moment!!
 
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