Toes cut too short, advice please....

flyawaywish

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My partners horse was shod 3 days ago, he is a typical TB and has 1/4 clips on the front feet.

Basically the apprentice has taken the toes back too far and the horse is now sore
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my partner has spoken wth farrier and is obviously very upset about this. Farrier tried to make a number of excuses but now it appears obvious it is the poor trimming that has made him lame. Farrier advised yard owner horse should be kept in again....he went out yesterday and seemed ok, heat subsiding slowly, so what should we do??

I am going to call my own trustworthy farrier for advice but owndered if this had happened to anyone elses horse?? thank you!
 

TheFarrier

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The only thing that helps is time. The horse needs time and good grass to grow back the missing hoof.

Cold hosing will help. Keratex hoof hardener will help (as when too much it taken you expose the sensitive) and good grass.

If the horse is kept in at all a deep bed will make him more comfortable.

Its easy to take too much of a TB by mistake but im sorry the farrier was not honest and appologetic for the mistake of the apprentice. The apprentice should be learning from this.
 

ladyt25

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The very same thing just happened to us recently. However it was our usual farrier and he has never done it before.

Ours is a TB too - oldie - and his feet had got rather long and I just think after the farrier took too much off it was just too much for his feet to take. He was very lame - more on one foreleg but we think all round really. His horn actually started to go black and then broke off.

We actually did end up getting the vet out for him as he was struggling due to the ground in the field being hard at the time. The vet just gave him a course of bute which he was on for about 2 weeks. We didn't stable him as he is better being kept out and he was quite good at keeping himswelf to himself. Once the ground softened he got a lot better and is nearly back to normal now but it has been about 6 weeks I think.

We have had the farrier out to see if there's anything he can do but he has just advised to leave well alone for the moment. We just have to wait for the horn to regrow.

If the heat is going in you horse then he probably isn't too bad - with ours his feet were pretty hot for a long time but I think the fat he had the freedom to walk about probably helped him.
 

mtj

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I've seen the same in an elderly anglo.

Again the apprentice took off too much toe.

this one came in lame and had a digital pulse so the vet was called.
although it wasn't true laminitis, she was kept in and given bute until the soreness/pulse subsided.

although the farrier denied it was their fault (and not thrilled vet had been called in) the apprentice did learn from this and was more careful
 

lizzieuk1

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think i would ring the vet explain whats happened and ask for some bute to help horse be more comfortable until the intial discomfort has settled, oh and bill farrier for cost of bute! he should have been there supervising the apprentice it really annoys me when they send an unqualified person to shoe the horse and don;t watch them, after all you're paying for a qualified farrier aren't you??
 

flyawaywish

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Thanks very much for your help.
He had got a digital pulse the following day when it became apparent he was lame. I just fed him this morning and felt his hooves as my partner then turns him out, I felt the swelling and heat was a little better and he went out all day y'day with no apparent ill effect, however now the farrier is saying that he should be kept in...

What does everyone think about keeping him in?
 

TheFarrier

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If he goes out he can move about and eat grass both with help with healing etc (grass to grow more foot and moving to promote blood supply to the area)

Keeping him in protects him from perhaps stepping on anything that may not have case pain normally but could give him nasy bruising now.

Its up to you, if you know his field is soft and free of anything that could hurt him then leave him out. It is pretty dry out so the ground may be quite hard.

If you can get him some bute do.
 

ladyt25

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I think as TheFarrier suggests, in my opinion I think, unless they are really struggling and very sore it is better for them to be turned out so they can move around, keep the blood flowing and get some grass down them. If needs be a bit of bute will help.

Ours is miles better now and almost back to his normal giddy self. He does have the benefit of a small bog in our field though and will stand in there quite often - guess he finds it soothing!
 

Marchtime

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We had this once or twice with our TB with different farriers. I always buted and turned out (providing they were comfortable) and left for a week. Seemed to work fine. Very frustrating though. Now we have a lovely farrier who seems to not cause problems.
 
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