Tot learning on a 13.2?

Araboo27

Well-Known Member
Joined
17 May 2013
Messages
350
Visit site
Due to unfortunate circumstances, we're down to one pony - my own 13.2 mare. My daughter, aged 3 and a half, loves 'riding' and I really want to encourage this (obviously!). Does anyone have experience of teaching a little one to ride on a bigger than ideal pony? She couldn't get past the lead rein stage on her, too sharp, but I'm thinking it might be possible for her to learn the basics...especially as pony's trot isn't as bouncy as a shetland/sec a?

Thoughts? I'm really loathe to find a part loan when all the work would fall on me.
 

Wishfilly

Well-Known Member
Joined
1 March 2016
Messages
2,898
Visit site
Due to unfortunate circumstances, we're down to one pony - my own 13.2 mare. My daughter, aged 3 and a half, loves 'riding' and I really want to encourage this (obviously!). Does anyone have experience of teaching a little one to ride on a bigger than ideal pony? She couldn't get past the lead rein stage on her, too sharp, but I'm thinking it might be possible for her to learn the basics...especially as pony's trot isn't as bouncy as a shetland/sec a?

Thoughts? I'm really loathe to find a part loan when all the work would fall on me.

How wide is your pony? It's not ideal for younger children to have their legs stretched too wide when riding, and this might be uncomfortable for her anyway. However, if your pony is narrow enough to be comfortable, there's no reason why she can't get the basics of walking and trotting on her. Using her legs may be an issue, especially if they don't come past the saddle flaps!
 

Melody Grey

Well-Known Member
Joined
14 April 2014
Messages
2,228
Visit site
Due to unfortunate circumstances, we're down to one pony - my own 13.2 mare. My daughter, aged 3 and a half, loves 'riding' and I really want to encourage this (obviously!). Does anyone have experience of teaching a little one to ride on a bigger than ideal pony? She couldn't get past the lead rein stage on her, too sharp, but I'm thinking it might be possible for her to learn the basics...especially as pony's trot isn't as bouncy as a shetland/sec a?

Thoughts? I'm really loathe to find a part loan when all the work would fall on me.

My little 5 year old is doing well on our 14.3hh welshie, so I don't see any reason why not if the pony is safe on the lead rein. I'd definitely agree that the trot is easier (although not for me on foot!!) than on the minis!! I think it depends on the character and reliability of the pony more than anything else. I'm not sure what will happen when DS wants to be off the leadrein- I'm hopeful that we could lunge safely as an in between. He used to have weekly lessons at a local riding school, but tbh I can't justify £100/month for something we can do perfectly well at home (I used to teach).


Edited to add: he has his own little saddle and the pony is quite forward, so no issues with using the leg.
 
Last edited:

Wagtail

Horse servant
Joined
2 December 2010
Messages
14,816
Location
Lincs
Visit site
Well I taught a four year old and a six year old on my 15.3hh WB mare. I kept loose side reins on her and kept the lunge/leading until they were a bit older, but within a couple of years they were jumping her. I wouldn't let them hack out on her though. I would say a 13.2 would be fine but you would need to keep hold and probably add a daisy rein or side reins.
 

Enfys

Well-Known Member
Joined
11 December 2004
Messages
18,086
Visit site
If you are happy with that then absolutely nothing wrong with it.
We have very young children learning on pasos which are between 13.2 and 14h, although as they are gaited rising to the trot is kind of by passed ;)

On the lead line children can still learn the basics on a larger pony. Small ponies can be just as sharp as larger ones :)
In Canada most children learn on larger ponies or quarter horses because that's what is around.
 

Araboo27

Well-Known Member
Joined
17 May 2013
Messages
350
Visit site
How wide is your pony? It's not ideal for younger children to have their legs stretched too wide when riding, and this might be uncomfortable for her anyway. However, if your pony is narrow enough to be comfortable, there's no reason why she can't get the basics of walking and trotting on her. Using her legs may be an issue, especially if they don't come past the saddle flaps!

Wider than ideal but not a massive amount of difference between her and our old sec a and Shetlands. Regarding leg aids I was thinking of working on our voice commands so that by time she's ready to go out on the lunge we'll be in a better position.

It's never going to be ideal but I think I'll just see what we can do. Maybe give it a year and consider getting her one. I can't see her losing interest - she's obsessed! She'll w/t/c quite happily sitting infront of someone, the faster the better, lol.
 

MagicMelon

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 November 2004
Messages
16,285
Location
North East Scotland
Visit site
My son (4 next month) rode my 13.2hh since he could sit upright and was trotting and jumping x-poles easily until we lost the pony last year sadly, we have since bought him a Dartmoor which is obviously more suited size-wise. The only issue I found with the bigger pony was his trot was too big for my son to even attempt to rise to. But generally he coped fine on the lead.
 

Araboo27

Well-Known Member
Joined
17 May 2013
Messages
350
Visit site
Finally got home and had chance to read all the replies - thanks! All sounds really positive, I'm going to get her on a few times a week and see how we get on :)
 

Merlod

Well-Known Member
Joined
22 November 2013
Messages
1,056
Visit site
My little sister never had a little pony, her first pony was 13.3 connie, bought for her to grow in to. She started off on lead rein, and rode him for 6 years was at the stage of doing fun rides and 2'3" courses and prelim before he sadly had to retire otherwise she would still be riding him now as we still have him! We couldn't have asked for a better first pony.
 

Dubsie

Well-Known Member
Joined
26 January 2009
Messages
4,756
Location
The Edge of Suburbia, Berkshire.
Visit site
We've a saint of a 13.2 without a job at the moment, and I have recently plonked some tiny tot non-riders on, he's been absolutely perfect, even the child which then screamed loudly wanting to get off he didn't bat an eyelid, more gave me A Look as if to say 'why did you let her get on?'.
 

Mooseontheloose

Well-Known Member
Joined
23 January 2015
Messages
387
Location
UK
Visit site
Probably not ideal, but the good thing is that it's big enough for someone else to keep schooled and exercised,very little children can't really ride for long enough to give a pony enough proper work.
The critical moment of control comes when a child's knees are lower than the widest part of a pony's sides, they can then get better balance and are less likely to be bounced off.
Of course everything depends on the termperament. There's lot's of little ***** ponies out there!
 
Top