Travelling two horses in trailer without partitions

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23 February 2021
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Has anybody experience of travelling two horses in a trailer without the partitions? I have one that travelled happily for a long time without partitions - just a front breech bar for the sole reason of having space to tack up etc. Now i have a second horse to travel, the first is scrambling for space with the partitions in to the point he is panicking, pulling shoes off and getting worse.

Taking out the rear half of the partition helps but i am wary of travelling two this way. Anybody regularly travel two in together without any partitions? Or any other suggestions? Both horses are friendly and good to load.
 

LEC

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Please don't, its v dangerous.
I thought the issue was it was easier for horses to turn around if you didn’t have one and it also provides a central structure support in case of an accident. I haven’t seen any data about it being more dangerous?
I also don’t really get how travelling one without a partition is fine and two without isn’t but happy to listen to science.

The problem is your horse has learnt to travel with no partition and I bet he travels herringbone to help. Now you want him to travel straight and a lot of horses find it really difficult. Personally if taking out back part of partition works I would carry on. I switched to a herringbone trailer for this reason as one wouldn’t travel with another straight.
 

Cheeky Chestnut

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I traveled two occasionally without a back partition purely because one horse scrambled. Both were perfectly fine and never stood on each other or had any issues. I could however have been lucky. Kia I just had to accept needed the full trailer so he always went to stuff alone.

I wouldn’t travel two with no partitions however
 
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I thought the issue was it was easier for horses to turn around if you didn’t have one and it also provides a central structure support in case of an accident. I haven’t seen any data about it being more dangerous?
I also don’t really get how travelling one without a partition is fine and two without isn’t but happy to listen to science.

The problem is your horse has learnt to travel with no partition and I bet he travels herringbone to help. Now you want him to travel straight and a lot of horses find it really difficult. Personally if taking out back part of partition works I would carry on. I switched to a herringbone trailer for this reason as one wouldn’t travel with another straight.
Travelling 2 without a partition is v inadvisable as the horses will lean on each other, can cause injuries from shoes and the like.
 

Orangehorse

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We used to do it, well ponies rather than horses so they had more room, we never had any trouble at all. But I think maybe the regulations have changed. I think also that modern trailers need the partition to keep the trailer rigid, on those heavy old Rice trailers it wasn't an issue.

Some partitions come right down to the floor, other only have a flap at the bottom so a horse could spread his hind legs in that sort.
 

milliepops

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Thinking about it, there used to be a regulation regarding the travelling of shod horses.
As I recall, each shod horse must be separated from another to prevent injury.
No idea if this is still current (perhaps one of our transporters on here would confirm?)
the guidance on gov.uk has all gone a bit squiffy because of brexit, but this guidance is still linked from there, a defra guide which says all except mares and foals should have individual stalls.

http://adlib.everysite.co.uk/resources/000/263/145/PB12544c.pdf
 

Northern Hare

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It's not something that I'd personally do, but when I was in NI, it was quite commonly done, especially for hunters.

A friend's relative who was a top horse vet swore it was the best way to travel two horses as they can spread their feet out to keep balance. And that was two big hunters led up the ramp together, no travel boots etc.

There was me feeling faint at the sight of it, but they traveled fantastically no damage at all.
 

LJF0664

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I can't offer any advice re removing the partition, just that I wouldn't want to do it myself!

Have you tried swapping the sides they travel in? When I swapped from a single to double trailer, my mare scrambled a bit on corners, not loads, but enough to have me worrying I'd made the wrong decision! She was always in the right, as either travelling alone, or the heavier of the 2. I tried putting her in the left, and she's back to travelling solid as a rock. I know its not the correct way to travel, especially on her own, but she is happy again, so we are sticking with it
 

Renvers

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I would only consider travelling a mare with her foal in a trailer in this situation.

With your horse that is unstable travelling forwards have you tried them in a box/trailer where you can travel them herringbone or rear facing? My old boy travels fine herringbone but not forwards, but had never had a problem when younger.
 

Mule

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I've never done it but the travellers near me always transport that way. I've never known them to have an accident.
 

P.forpony

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Just to horrify everyone above...
But I nearly had a heart attack at my new job freshly arrived in Canada.
13 horses fully saddled, bridles hung over saddle horns not a scrap of boot or bandage in sight, all loaded on to THE SAME TRAILER!
It had one single partition about 5 horses in apparently to stop the load 'shifting' 😱
They all travelled beautifully, not a single knock or scrape in the 4+ years I saw it.
 
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It's not something that I'd personally do, but when I was in NI, it was quite commonly done, especially for hunters.

A friend's relative who was a top horse vet swore it was the best way to travel two horses as they can spread their feet out to keep balance. And that was two big hunters led up the ramp together, no travel boots etc.

There was me feeling faint at the sight of it, but they traveled fantastically no damage at all.
It's not something that I'd personally do, but when I was in NI, it was quite commonly done, especially for hunters.

A friend's relative who was a top horse vet swore it was the best way to travel two horses as they can spread their feet out to keep balance. And that was two big hunters led up the ramp together, no travel boots etc.

There was me feeling faint at the sight of it, but they traveled fantastically no damage at all.
I am in NI! These aren’t big hunters but I think one does need a bit more space to balance.
 

Kamikaze

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I thought it was illegal unless a mare and foal.

Watching “the pioneer woman” they tacked up horses and popped them all on a trailer together. It was covered at the front and open at the back. Unloaded wherever it was and off to work. Finished. Back in trailer again together and home they went.
 

DabDab

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Just to horrify everyone above...
But I nearly had a heart attack at my new job freshly arrived in Canada.
13 horses fully saddled, bridles hung over saddle horns not a scrap of boot or bandage in sight, all loaded on to THE SAME TRAILER!
It had one single partition about 5 horses in apparently to stop the load 'shifting' 😱
They all travelled beautifully, not a single knock or scrape in the 4+ years I saw it.
Generally different and far more substantial trailers than the ones we typically have in the UK. Not to mention very different roads to navigate.

I've certainly seen it done in lorries, but they have always been pretty packed in so less likely to develop a full stagger. I've topped and tailed in between partitions without issue, but I wouldn't do it now unless desperate.
 

P.forpony

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Generally different and far more substantial trailers than the ones we typically have in the UK. Not to mention very different roads to navigate.

I've certainly seen it done in lorries, but they have always been pretty packed in so less likely to develop a full stagger. I've topped and tailed in between partitions without issue, but I wouldn't do it now unless desperate.
Yes definitely differences in equipment and conditions and obviously an extreme example.
But suggestive perhaps that a lack of partitions doesn't enviably lead to death and disaster.
Each horse/trailer/driver is different and what suits and is safe for one might be awful for another.

Usually I would do a very short off road test run with a helper on hand if I though a different travelling arrangement might suit a particular horse, or possibly just build up the time spent travelling in the partition as it sounds like OPs horse is used to the extra room and might just need time to adjust and settle to the new more confined arrangement.

Out of interest do you always travel them on the same sides? Swapping might make a difference, some seem to have a distinct preference.
 
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