WB vs Irish

Willow1306

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 December 2007
Messages
656
Having spent over a decade only riding - and generally being around - performance bred WBs, I’ve just taken the plunge on a young Irish horse with unrecorded/unverified breeding. He seems to have correct (but not flashy or extravagant) paces, carries himself in good balance, and I like the way he is put together (underneath all the hair) - though he isn’t what you’d describe as refined. I’m hoping he’ll also have the honest Irish temperament/attitude towards life, though he’s young and unproven, so time will tell.

I’m interested to hear from those who have also moved from a flashy WB to a more workmanlike type and whether you miss the bigger movement etc? Any regrets?

Just general curiosity really, and something to spend time pondering during lockdown!
 

ycbm

Well-Known Member
Joined
30 January 2015
Messages
39,800
I lost my first flashy warmblood to wobblers, sold my second because he would not jump (but in retrospect I suspect kissing spines), and lost my third to fits after fixing kissing spines.

I went back to mongrels with a sigh of relief and have spent a tenth of the money on vets, a fiftieth of the energy on trying to manage them, and not lost more than a few days work in over six years.

I occasionally miss the sheer power combined with balletic movement of the first, the other two I miss like a hole in the head.

.
 

atropa

Well-Known Member
Joined
26 September 2012
Messages
1,185
Oh my god I could write on this for days. I have a very well bred Belgian WB, and an unrecorded breeding ISH.
They could not be more different. Yes my WB is stunning with bouncy, uphill paces to die for but my god she is a walking vet bill, so difficult to manage (e.g. suffers from navicular so requires as much turnout as possible, but extremely prone to colic so requires me to watch her diet like a hawk), and such a drama queen. My ISH on the other hand has much more ground covering 'daisy cutter' type paces, but somehow does so much better at dressage, and is soo much more sensible and low maintenance. I used to do a lot of SJ with my WB, but have moved that although a lot longer and more difficult to maneuver, my ISH really loves jumping and is very honest and careful.
Yes, there is nothing quite like a WB for those beautiful floaty paces but honestly Irish horses are just as athletic in their own way.
 

Cortez

Well-Known Member
Joined
17 January 2009
Messages
11,502
Location
Ireland
Do you know the breeding of your ISH? These days there is a lot of WB blood around in Irish horses.

Having bred WB's for many years, and living in the home of the Irish horse, I have to confess to not having owned or ridden either for more than 20 years. Horses for courses, as they say, and I'll never ride anything that isn't Spanish ever again.
 

Goldenstar

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 March 2011
Messages
40,517
I love love love a good warmblood sharp flexible and athletic they learn fast , the good and the bad .
My two favourite horses where warmblood on the sire side and traditional Irish sport on the other .
They both had the best on both sides really lovely horses .
For a hunter or a all rounder it’s difficult to beat the traditional type of Irish riding horse But once you require the higher level of performance for top competition I think the specialist breeding of the warmblood does give it the edge .
But few of us need that and many of those failed for the top level warmbloods are not the best suited for the all round life style that most people want a horse for that’s where the traditional Irish horse with it roots in the ultimate all round draught horse the Irish Draught has the edge .
 

Willow1306

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 December 2007
Messages
656
I’m told he is 50% ID, 25% Connemara and 25% WB but can’t be sure as all unrecorded.

I’ve not necessarily had bad experiences with WBs to get to this point; it’s been more a change in circumstances, a new perspective and right place/right time/right price!
 

Kamikaze

Well-Known Member
Out to Pasture
Joined
1 June 2007
Messages
4,214
I went from a tb and an ex racer to an ID. Hated it and he was sold on. Then went to a WB who is perfect. Def cheeper on the feeding and so far has had less injuries but still thinks he is a tb and so melts and gets cold easily and then can’t walk when I try and take shoes off! Still has some of the spark of the tbs and can be hysterical but can’t see myself ever having a tub again even though I still love them.
 

oldie48

Well-Known Member
Joined
15 April 2013
Messages
6,440
Location
South Worcestershire
I've just posted a pic of our ISH on one of the threads. He was by Ricardo Z (WB) out of a TB mare with some ID (King of Diamonds line). He moved like a WB, galloped like an ID which was not ideal for an eventer, jumped like a stag and lived on fresh air not greedy, just thrifty and was tough. I think we place too much emphasis on the breed instead of just looking at the horse in front of us and their actual breeding line.
 

Jango

Well-Known Member
Joined
14 July 2010
Messages
504
I'm absolutely loving my little irish mare, she just comes at everything with a good try and a smile on her face :) shes jumping bred warm blood on her sires side and god knows on her dams side, something smaller and hairier! She seems to have got the best of both worlds so far, sensible Irish brain, sturdy legs, with good paces and a smart jump. I've had a few full WBs and they are lovely but too many unsoundness issues.
 

SOS

Well-Known Member
Joined
1 February 2016
Messages
1,127
My HannovarianxISH (yes technically just a mongrel of two warm bloods but just to emphasise) was an absolute dream. Workman attitude with a fab jump and extravagant paces. Forever catching everyone’s eye as he was good looking with the temperament to match. Unfortunately his warm blood side is probably what led to chronic low level damage which then erupted in a torn DDFT. Might be nothing but me and my very experienced YO were convinced if he wasn’t so ‘fancy’ and had such a large jump he perhaps would of lasted longer.

Have had some since but now have an ISH again. He has his own presence in being so well mannered but isn’t as drop dead handsome as the WBx. That said this one is a much more pleasant hunter as conserves himself, doesn’t jump you out of the tack and has a heart of gold so will try his very best. Calculated and calm I’d say. So whilst not the most impressive to look at in any sphere he gives me the most enjoyment and haven’t found an obstacle he couldn’t clear yet!

WarmbloodxTB was lovely to look at and moved nice but much much too hot!
 

blitznbobs

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 June 2010
Messages
4,955
Location
Cheshire
All my warm bloods have been balanced and so quick to learn... my Irish one now is a total numpty , thick as two short planks but safe as houses... tbh If he hadn’t had numerous medical issues he’d be been sold on by now and I’d have another wb but I’m sure they suit some people very well especially if you like travelling exclusively in straight lines... he’s a lovely person but very strange to ride when I’ve been used to the warmblood flexibility but I may just have bought “a Friday afternoon Irish’
 

Willow1306

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 December 2007
Messages
656
All my warm bloods have been balanced and so quick to learn... my Irish one now is a total numpty , thick as two short planks but safe as houses... tbh If he hadn’t had numerous medical issues he’d be been sold on by now and I’d have another wb but I’m sure they suit some people very well especially if you like travelling exclusively in straight lines... he’s a lovely person but very strange to ride when I’ve been used to the warmblood flexibility but I may just have bought “a Friday afternoon Irish’
Oh dear 🙈 Luckily I’ve seen this one doing some lateral work at liberty in the field, so hopefully he’ll go in more than one direction 🤞🏻
 

Green Bean

Well-Known Member
Joined
1 February 2017
Messages
502
I had a KWPN who I loved to bits but who seemed intent on killing me. Honestly, I was the problem because I had over horsed myself. My advice is simply to be honest with your abilities and judge a horse on its overall picture and not just breeding. I have a ISH now but she is ISHxZangersheide. She is a step down from a KWPN in terms of ‘look’ and not a huge fan of cuddles, but goodness she is the love of my life. I thought about getting a cob, but honestly I am not a fan, but that is just personal. The TBxID cross interests me but the reasonable ones are quite pricey
 

zaminda

Well-Known Member
Joined
26 August 2008
Messages
2,300
Location
Somerset
My ISH was free due to serious temperament issues. She isn't hugely friendly, but has improved hugely on this front, you no longer think she would kick you for fun. As she has strengthened up her movement has improved massively. She has a big heart if she is on your side and is tough as they come. She also has more speed than I thought!
 

Willow1306

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 December 2007
Messages
656
Yes, and rather than getting bogged down by defining 'WB' and 'ISH', my point was more in respect of having mainly ridden performance-bred horses with specific characteristics - e.g. big, flashy paces and scopey jump (that just so happened to typically be european WB types) and now changing to something of unrecorded breeding, not bred from a specific line or for a specific job - and whether or not this change in type is going to feel like a downgrade (no offence intended) or just different. I guess only time will tell on that one!
 

Abi90

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 February 2007
Messages
2,004
Yes, and rather than getting bogged down by defining 'WB' and 'ISH', my point was more in respect of having mainly ridden performance-bred horses with specific characteristics - e.g. big, flashy paces and scopey jump (that just so happened to typically be european WB types) and now changing to something of unrecorded breeding, not bred from a specific line or for a specific job - and whether or not this change in type is going to feel like a downgrade (no offence intended) or just different. I guess only time will tell on that one!

I think it honestly depends on the horse. I’ve had two well bred ISH, both with European Warmblood in there. Both looked handsome enough but we’re not particularly clever or that good at jumping. I was gifted my full ID who, despite having good showjump lines, shouldn’t be as athletic... she’s got the nicest paces and the boldest, most technical And powerful jump of the 3. She’s not flashy, she’s built like a true hunter but she’s pretty and sporty and gets compliments wherever she goes.

The other two, on paper, should have been better
 

ihatework

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 September 2004
Messages
18,919
Yes, and rather than getting bogged down by defining 'WB' and 'ISH', my point was more in respect of having mainly ridden performance-bred horses with specific characteristics - e.g. big, flashy paces and scopey jump (that just so happened to typically be european WB types) and now changing to something of unrecorded breeding, not bred from a specific line or for a specific job - and whether or not this change in type is going to feel like a downgrade (no offence intended) or just different. I guess only time will tell on that one!
I really depends on the horse.
I have one horse in mind that belongs to a friend of mine.
Dire breeding
Ugly as sin
Roach back

But by god is he lovely to ride - honest, forwards, intelligent and it’s like sitting on a rubber ball.
Ive ridden plenty of well bred planks of wood in my time!
 
Joined
2 July 2009
Messages
6,627
Both my warmbloods are pretty sane and lovely to deal with in all ways. No vices, box, shoe catch etc. Perfectly. They’re both from jumping lines although I don’t really jump and bought them as all rounders. My oldie is 25yrs is BWB by Major de la Cour and he’s been a great horse. Not without issues some physical some training but overall lots of great times over 15 years. Newer boy is KWPN with Contender in his breeding again pretty laid back most of the time. Both are not particularly forward and can be spooky twats though so do need riding forward which can be tiresome.

When I bought the younger one I had no intention of getting another warmblood because I’m 50 this year and wanted something lower key. I tried a fair few Irish bred and what struck me is their complete lack of education and I just wasn’t taken by their way of going. I ended up buying a 9yr old chestnut WB from a private seller.
 
Top