Welsh Sport horse as a spare...would you??

palo1

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So to entertain myself whilst my spotted friend is off sick (hopefully not for long - lame, possibly abcess or bruising) I have been thinking 'what if I had a spare?' I don't really have time or energy to keep 2 horses fit enough to do the kind of work we usually do so this is really a diversion BUT I have long fancied something a bit Welshy (a larger section D). It's all that flamboyance, hair and attitude I guess; I always was a fan of glam rock!! :) My current partner is a 16hh sort of spotted warmblood - plenty of arab and tb there so athletic, sharp, speedy and sensitive but has a great brain, loves getting out and learning and doing stuff. He is completely sensible except when he is not IYSWIM. I adore every particle of him. He is, on the other hand, quite high maintenance (though I was clearly put on this earth for the express purpose of keeping him happy, healthy and sound). If I had a 'spare' and it was a bit Welshy, what would my experience be like? I have heard that they can be a bit 'quirky'...e Are they sound and easy sort of beasts, trainable and adaptable or should I look elsewhere for 'spare' fun? Previous experience has been with more 'Irish' sorts and rather varied tbh.
 

ester

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I think it depends how much you like your horses to have 'character'. I'm not sure mine has ever rocked being low maintenance either :D :D.

They do like to learn new stuff, and then show it off even when you are asking them to do something else ;).
 

annagain

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I owned a full Welshy. He was opinionated, arrogant, bolshy, stubborn, ridiculously excitable (we got banned from mounted games at pony club for the safety of others :eek:) and the most awesome, safe (he spent a lot of time on two legs but never ever got close to going too far) bombproof and utterly dependable horse I've ever sat on. I had total faith in him getting me to the other side of a fence.

A friend has a Sec D x warmblood. He's the most intelligent horse I've ever met. This works for and against him. He got his rug stuck on the fence and rather than panicking just waited patiently to be freed, picking at the greener grass the other side while he waited. He can unfasten anything used to tie him up and he also worked out how to jump over the breast bar on the trailer and out of the jockey door -he's done it twice now. The second time he took himself show jumping in the main ring of a county show.

If he's away from home, he's unbelievably clingy to his mates, to the point that at camp he was tied up outside my stable while my friend mucked out. Mine (a total gent) was in my stable with me as I mucked out. This wasn't close enough for him. He untied himself, jumped the wheelbarrow blocking the door and attached himself to my horse. We've had to drive to Harpury (a 2 hour journey) separately, park in different car parks and avoid each other all day just so he won't throw himself off the trailer if he's left alone. If he goes alone and doesn't see anyone he knows, he's fine and will stand all day.

No matter how silly he is though, he's perfect the second my friend gets on him to ride. He's perfect in traffic, hacks like a dream and events to intermediate. There's not a horse in the world I'd rather ride XC.


I'd have another Welshy or a partbred like a shot.
 

milliepops

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Mines not exactly sporty being a 14.2 D but she's hugely fun, cute and quick witted, trainable, opinionated, generous. I think I'll always want something a bit Welsh from now on :D
 

PapaverFollis

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I think if you need a horse to be low maintenance you need to go looking without a specific type in mind and go on a horse by horse basis. And still consider how you would cope if they aren't low maintenance after all. My Irish bred maxi cob type should be low maintenance... but she isn't. Actually needs work everyday to stay happy and to leep weight off because shes a good doer. But she doesn't need shoes or feed so she's low maintenance in some ways. My Anglo Arab on the other hand looks like she should be high maintenance but can be left for weeks and rides exactly the same, doesn't gain or lose much weight no matter what happens to feed or exercise and is so well behaved for everyone. Only thing that she insists on is needing shod every 6 weeks! I call the Anglo a princess but she really isn't it is the beast if an Irish cob that needs pandering to really!

So yeah. Can't comment on welshies but if it is really vital that you get a low maintenance one, keep your options open and find out as much as you can before you buy!
 

SEL

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I've got a high maintenance spotty too - who is also off games.

I rode my friends Welsh C for years and he was awesome. Sadly lost to colic last year but I knew him since he was 2 and helped her back him. Naughty, cheeky, brave as a lion and I loved hacking him. I'd have another welshy in a heartbeat - quirks and all!
 

scats

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I had a Welsh x TB, best looking horse I’ve ever laid eyes on, but absolutely crackers.
 

palo1

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I've got a high maintenance spotty too - who is also off games.

I rode my friends Welsh C for years and he was awesome. Sadly lost to colic last year but I knew him since he was 2 and helped her back him. Naughty, cheeky, brave as a lion and I loved hacking him. I'd have another welshy in a heartbeat - quirks and all!
Aw, sorry to hear your horse is off games. I love the native types, I love my hot-blooded spotty too! Best horse I ever rode (sadly didn't own him) was an Arab x Welsh. He was truly extraordinary but usually going too fast for me to think!!
 

HappyHorses:)

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You are aware that the "D" in section D often stands for Diva ..... ��

I love the welshies, and have two, but very often are not for the faint hearted or the stupid as will take the proverbial pee pee ��
 

jjsblackhorse

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Go Welsh. Like you I fancied a Welsh section D and last July got a Welsh section D X Warmblood some where between 16hh and 16.2(sold as 16.2 but it depends on his mood)!
He is fantastic love him to bits you go out on him and can't help having a big idiotic grin on your face...... He hunts, does riding club, combined training, xc the lot ..... Fiery but safe.....
 

HashRouge

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I adore my sister's Welsh D, but he's put me off ever owning one! She's owned him since he was 5 and he's now 15. He was rideable for the first two years and since then he's had navicular, hock arthritis, SI problems and ulcers, and has been retired to the field completely for the past two years. He's also as mad as a box of frogs! A loveable dope once you catch him, it's the catching him that's the issue! He acts as though he's never seen a person before! However, I think he is a special kind of special, IYSWIM :D
 

JJS

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I ended up with a part-bred Welsh by accident, after my cob mare popped out her BOGOF baby. Flower is 11 months now, and I honestly couldn't love her more. She's an absolute people person, and thrives on attention. She's the kindest and most affectionate horse I've ever come across, and delights in being praised. Her only real downsides are that she's incredibly stubborn, and that she gets very upset if she doesn't understand something right off the bat. As soon as she realises she's got it wrong, she has to either be given time to wind down, or else very quickly asked to do something that she's good at. She's quirky, full of character, and makes my heart sing every second that I spend with her.
 

palo1

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I ended up with a part-bred Welsh by accident, after my cob mare popped out her BOGOF baby. Flower is 11 months now, and I honestly couldn't love her more. She's an absolute people person, and thrives on attention. She's the kindest and most affectionate horse I've ever come across, and delights in being praised. Her only real downsides are that she's incredibly stubborn, and that she gets very upset if she doesn't understand something right off the bat. As soon as she realises she's got it wrong, she has to either be given time to wind down, or else very quickly asked to do something that she's good at. She's quirky, full of character, and makes my heart sing every second that I spend with her.
I have seen your posts and Flower is lovely!
 

DirectorFury

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My Welsh is the best thing that's ever happened to me. She certainly has her wild moments but I've never ever felt unsafe on her. She can be difficult on the ground away from the yard but it's only because she's anxious. If I get unseated she tries her hardest to stay under me when she could easily spin or drop a shoulder and send me out of the side door. She's only stubborn if I don't ask for something properly and will do as I ask if it's at all possible. She's not really a people-horse but will put up with fuss if it involves treats or itchy spots :).

Get one! Or a TB or WB x if you want a bit more blood.
 

Mosh

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I've got a welsh and at 24 she's still mad.
She is a kind mare to people and little ones, she is the best horse I've ever ridden out hacking. She keeps herself safe and therefore me otherwise she can't get fed!
She lives in or out, alone and with company.
I love her to the moon and back.
She's bonkers, kind and the heart of a lion. I'd have another one tomorrow.
 

southerncomfort

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Mine is 25 and I absolutely love her to bits.

She can be an absolute pest i.e. untying herself or regularly staging breakouts through the electric fencing, freeing her buddies in the process.

She has been a huge confidence giver to me (although I'm not sure everyone would enjoy some of her antics), before I got her I'd been bolted with and wasn't sure I ever wanted to sit on a horse again. She is a fabulous hack, nothing on the road bothers her in the slightest. She does occasionally spook at ridiculous things and it is absolutely impossible to predict what she will take exception too. This is where a good sense of humour will come in handy! :D

We do occasionally have 'discussions' during which I have to remind her that I'm in charge of speed and steering. She has quite firm opinions about what we should be doing but accepts that I have the deciding vote with good grace. We both take confidence from each other and I learned quite quickly that if I put my trust in her she will look after me, likewise if she is feeling anxious about something (you can tell because she holds her breath!) she trusts me if I tell her it's ok so we look out for each other.

She is extremely kind and sensible around small people and is the most affectionate horse I've ever known. She has been known to stand in the field with her head in my arms for ages. She particularly likes sticking her pink muzzle in my face and gently blowing on my skin. :)

She is amazing and when she goes it will break me in two.
 

pansymouse

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I have a 25 yo Welsh sports horse and she's best horse I've ever owned. She's fast, pretty, healthy and beautifully mannered. Yes, she's opinionated, very dominant with other horses, prone to spooking at the most random things (dandelions, cowpats etc.) and completely unaffectionate. However she's an amazing ride still bold, hard working and best of all great fun.
 

EmmaC78

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I had a Welsh D x TB. He was amazing, a horse of a lifetime. I wouldn't hesitate to get another.
 

McFluff

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A friend of mine own some and breeds welsh d and they are lovely. Thrive on hard work and sound. They are interesting when young, but mature nicely with good consistent training. Wouldn’t want one that had poor training or history as I suspect they would remember it well!
 

sidewaysonacob

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Get the right one and it will be pretty fricking awesome,

Get the wrong one and it will probably be a PITA.

I lucked out with the former
Me too. My Welsh D an amazing ride and great to handle, but is also very, very bright, an escapologist, gets grumpy if he hasn't got a job to do and gets jealous if I spend time with other horses. He's herd leader which is definitely a breed personality thing - his second in command is a Welsh B. So mine definitely wouldn't be any good as a 'spare' (even though he doesn't need riding every day) and I suspect most of that is down to breed traits.
 

Crazy_cat_lady

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I have one and wouldn't want another there is far too much drama involved!

Couldn't fault his temperament not a nasty bone in his body but my he makes you want to pull you hair out sometimes!

He is headshy so must have had issues with a previous owner before i knew him. I got him off the rs I used to work at as he couldn't cope with the rs environment. Bit of a pity buy as I used to loan him from them at the time.

If he was a person he would potentially be autistic. He definitely seems to have a window for catching. You miss that window you can forget it. However if he doesn't want to be caught he will completely ignore food or his treat ball being rattled in a world of his own almost. Was great when he decided to do it one Xmas day and kept staring across the field yet would p off if you thought oh I'll go and try get him in then suddenly he came to the gate and started shouting to come in! He's refused to be caught for a week once.

Lovely welshy knee movement especially demonstrated when running across the field away from you!

Extremely hysterical a fellow livery the other day said he scares himself he will be tied on the yard and suddenly leaps backwards snorting as a clump of hair or even nothing has blown in front of him. Hacking walked past some fly tipped rubbish yet slams to a snorting halt because there is poo or mud on the road or the puddle we were trotting through has parted and revealed road (despite him having Walked on said road the whole hack!) If trimming his front legs if he catches sight of the hair on the floor he leaps sideways across the stable snorting in case it dare attack him. If he just stood still it would be so much easier! He was freezing cold waiting to come in just before Xmas with the snow but because the gate dared crack some ice that's it he was off yet when I caught him he was freezing!

Interestingly when insuring him and when I went on a beach ride when on holiday the insurance person said how he sounds a typical d and the beach ride person said how "interesting" they are!

He is extremely intelligent almost too intelligent loves lickit and has worked out the hardest holder etc. He's often worse if you mollycoddle him and will be even more hysterical you have to be a leader to him.

Would be interesting to know how much of the hysteria is linked to his upbringing and how much is just being a d! Love the d stands for drama quote!
 
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Crazy_cat_lady

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I have a 25 yo Welsh sports horse and she's best horse I've ever owned. She's fast, pretty, healthy and beautifully mannered. Yes, she's opinionated, very dominant with other horses, prone to spooking at the most random things (dandelions, cowpats etc.) and completely unaffectionate. However she's an amazing ride still bold, hard working and best of all great fun.
Interesting how you say yours is unaffectionate I'd say mine is too. Also definitely wouldn't cuddle him anyway as I'd be waiting for something to scare him and he leap backwards and hit my face! He's also borderline aloof with other horses and prefer to go out with the ponies rather than the more boisterous big horses.
 

milliepops

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Interesting how you say yours is unaffectionate I'd say mine is too. Also definitely wouldn't cuddle him anyway as I'd be waiting for something to scare him and he leap backwards and hit my face! He's also borderline aloof with other horses and prefer to go out with the ponies rather than the more boisterous big horses.
where as mine is the most cwtchy horse ever, she is SOOO affectionate, loves cuddles, always wants to be near you, she's just adorable. I've never had such a soppy horse. I think they're all really different. Mine is super bright, she doesn't miss a thing but when she figured out that it was fun to learn stuff she's been so quick and nice to train. The only drama is separation anxiety but she was kept on her own before I got her, so she has a bit of a mental hang up about being left now.
 

pansymouse

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Interesting how you say yours is unaffectionate I'd say mine is too. Also definitely wouldn't cuddle him anyway as I'd be waiting for something to scare him and he leap backwards and hit my face! He's also borderline aloof with other horses and prefer to go out with the ponies rather than the more boisterous big horses.
Mine likes ponies too, she thinks cobs are yobs and need constant supervision; I've never seen her with big horses. If a horse doesn't accept her as leader she will try and batter them into submission, she has a hell of a double barrel kick. I get one cuddle a year when she gets sedated to have her teeth done; as soon as she starts coming round she looks as me with utter contempt and I back off (she would never hurt me, she simply is not an affectionate animal).
 

palo1

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Yes, they do not sound like ideal 'spare' horses but definately worth enjoying as a regular riding partner! I have known some very sensitive cobs so some of the 'drama' is, I think, not unusual. It seems to me that Welshies have their fair share of hot blood and should be treated much more as a blood horse than they may be. Of course, some blood horses are so laid back they are horizontal so all are individual. Perhaps I should consider a yearling so that my current horse has time to get a bit older before I have to work on 2 hot, sharp, sensitive horses regularly!! I love the early years with horses so perhaps that is something to consider :)
 

BethanT

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They can be great!

I have a welsh D X TB, and she is amazing. Very sporty looking if it wasn't for the fact she is a tad croup high. Still athletic all the same, even more so than my 16hh TB.

She's quite low maintenance in terms of feed etc, and she can go periods of time not being worked, and I can just pick her back up again no issue. She surprises me every time.

She can be sharp and quirky, but her attitude to learning is amazing and she has a great character.

As others have said, getting the right one is key. I personally love the breed, and if I was to ever buy again I would look at Welsh D cross TB again.
 

Lammy

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A friend of mine own some and breeds welsh d and they are lovely. Thrive on hard work and sound. They are interesting when young, but mature nicely with good consistent training. Wouldn’t want one that had poor training or history as I suspect they would remember it well!
Yes to the remembering bad situations! Mine must have been smacked on the bum by a gate or something once because she is very wary of a small gap, despite having no altercations with one for at least 10 years.
My 20 year old welshie is just perfect, so so well behaved, has the odd cheeky buck and used to suddenly stop when we used to jump years ago but she really is a saint. It was never anything dangerous, I'd describe her as quirky but totally safe, I trust that horse with my life. Fallen off her twice in all the years I've had her and both instances were my fault.
My friend got a Welsh d last year, he's lovely, she's always been more into warmbloods but had a smaller budget this time around. I don't think she regrets her decision at all, he's a proper dressage diva whilst mine is a hopper of hedges! :)
 
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