What consitutes a 5 or 10* home?

windand rain

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5 star home is one where they have 365 day turnout preferrably 24/7 but would concede a few stars for in/out 365 day a year. the duvet day brigade would have me racing to the hills as would those who call horses their babies. That would be my top priority then the ability to know that anything less is substandard. The experience bit again is more important than competition, and a long term home where physically possible. Your set up sounds nearer the 10 star level from my point of view
 

HorseMaid

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A 5* home to me is one that caters to the horses emotional wellbeing and where their nutritional and health needs are met. For my mare this means that she gets 24 hour turnout all summer in her small herd, last winter stabled overnight (in our rough ass homemade stables) and access to forage all the time. I wouldn't ever class a 5* home as one with top notch facilities where the horse stands in a stable for 23 hours a day or where it only ever gets individual turnout.

Edited to add that in an ideal world I'd have mine out 24/7 all year as to me that is gold standard, but our winter grazing is on clay and the field wasn't up to it!
 

Caol Ila

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Well, that's why it's meaningless, isn't it? My idea of a "5* home" might not be the same as yours. It's not even the same for every horse! Who knew what Gypsum considered a "5* home?" Not me, half the time. If she'd had opposable thumbs and the internet, she would be that horse-person blasting Trip Advisor and Google with angry reviews. But Foinavon's and Hermosa's "5* home" would have gotten a firm 1 star in her view, while they would have been writing angry Trip Advisor reviews about her dream set-up.
 

SO1

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Sounds lovely. You have a field shelter so no problem if horses likes to stabled in it can go into the field shelter when it fancies it.

I don't think you should be put off by ads that say the horses likes to be stabled at night if the horse has free access to a field shelter if it wants in at night or in bad weather it has that choice.
 

catkin

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Well, that's why it's meaningless, isn't it? My idea of a "5* home" might not be the same as yours. It's not even the same for every horse! Who knew what Gypsum considered a "5* home?" Not me, half the time. If she'd had opposable thumbs and the internet, she would be that horse-person blasting Trip Advisor and Google with angry reviews. But Foinavon's and Hermosa's "5* home" would have gotten a firm 1 star in her view, while they would have been writing angry Trip Advisor reviews about her dream set-up.
Absolutely this - what is a great set up for one horse will not suit another.
 

milliepops

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Or "no time wasters" . What's that in an advert for? Oh yes, sorry, I won't ring you now, time wasting was what I was all about.
well from the other side of the fence (currently have one on the market) i don't know how you screen out timewasters tbh, so this is probably desperation talking ;)
last advert i didn't say anything like that and got about 150 pointless messages in a day. this time i said i'd only take phone calls and it's been much more sensible! if i see "no time wasters" i just assume the person advertising is tired of the dreamers and day trippers :(

OP you sound like a 5* home. for me it just means that the horse's well being is a priority, nothing about yard facilities.
 

Alwaysmoretoknow

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The whole buying/selling issue is a bit of a weird thing. I was that person who used to run a yard with all the 5* facilities ( horse walker, 20x60 arena, lovely stables, hot wash, stud rail fencing, solarium etc.) and could show prospective sellers where their horse would go on photos on my phone.
When looking for a horse for my 13yo I always tried to be tactful if the horse wasn't suitable unless the horse was obviously unsound which I would try to point out sensitively otherwise I would use the get out clause of 'your horse is too good for what we need'. It was always suprising how many sellers came back to offer their horses at a much reduced price.
This is what has led me to believe that people are a bit blinded as to what they really hope for in a successful purchase and securing a long term home. Here's 2 little photos FB_IMG_1597054179349.jpg FB_IMG_1647775953843.jpg that makes me smile.
 

Lois Lame

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This is pretty much me. Obviously I wouldn't want a horse whose idea of home was five feeds per day, a solarium and a horse walker-
Sorry to cut you off, scruffy, but surely no horse enjoys a (mechanical) horse walker? They are ghastly. I think any horse in their right mind (I presume some are) would love a human walker who would take them out on interesting trails, but around and around in too small a circle? Horse walkers are for the convenience of humans.
 

Birker2020

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Or "no time wasters" . What's that in an advert for? Oh yes, sorry, I won't ring you now, time wasting was what I was all about.
I hate that, it puts me off ringing up to enquire.

I think any buyer is a potential 'time waster'. Someone arrives to view a horse for sale, doesn't like the horse for whatever reason (perfectly fair and acceptable to do this for God's sake) and then you get branded 'a time waster'. Makes my blood boil.

This is a commitment for the next 20 + years. So if we don't like something about the horse and walk away why do we get called a 'joy rider' or a 'time waster'?
 

milliepops

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I hate that, it puts me off ringing up to enquire.

I think any buyer is a potential 'time waster'. Someone arrives to view a horse for sale, doesn't like the horse for whatever reason (perfectly fair and acceptable to do this for God's sake) and then you get branded 'a time waster'. Makes my blood boil.

This is a commitment for the next 20 + years. So if we don't like something about the horse and walk away why do we get called a 'joy rider' or a 'time waster'?
i disagree with that definition of timewaster. you can change your mind but the key is probably just letting the seller know at that point so everyone knows where they stand.

Some examples of enquiries i had recently were things like "would you hold him for a month while i find a field" (dreamer category) and then someone who spent days stringing me along, sending photos of her yard and fields, gushing about how excited she was to come and view, wanted to bring the viewing forward twice which i took time off work to accommodate... and then when i messaged her the morning of the viewing with detailed directions she said she had a cold. no request to rebook... so clearly never intended to come.

People who are reasonable probably don't even realise how much of this goes on. i wouldn't dream of wasting someones time like that, if i enquire about a horse i am anticipating that i genuinely might buy it. but there are a lot of people who seem to be in la la land!
 

Polos Mum

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OP I think if sellers asked (which i think would be a bit odd) I would just say that you have access to stables and an arena (which you do just not directly on site).
No seller will do a home inspection (or rarely). I wouldn't make a big fuss of what you have or don't have.

My horse's dream home would be as much food as he could shovel in - that might not be what would actually be good for him !
 

scruffyponies

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Sorry to cut you off, scruffy, but surely no horse enjoys a (mechanical) horse walker? They are ghastly. I think any horse in their right mind (I presume some are) would love a human walker who would take them out on interesting trails, but around and around in too small a circle? Horse walkers are for the convenience of humans.
That's kind of my point. Most humans would not for a moment think that mine is a 5* home, by any standard that we tend to apply. We don't compete. Our few rosettes are of the 'we turned up' variety. Not even a yard to tie up in, let alone stables. Shelter is a hedge.
Whether we are a suitable home depends whether you ask a person or a horse!
 

ILuvCowparsely

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As above really.
I am tentantively looking for an unassuming 14hish low level allrounder (pref 'fizzy' sort of mare) and sort of assumed that I could offer a good home.
I am an experienced and qualified light weight former professional and keep my 3 retired horses/ponies at home out 24/7 on chalk grazing with good fencing and access to a field shelter, adequate rugs if required and as much hay/ hard feed as necessary. They have regular farrier visits (6-8 weeks all unshod), dental care, vacs, worm counts etc. etc. and access to direct fantastic off-road hacking.
However I don't have stables (although I could secure one in an emergency about 75m away on a local yard) or an arena (though available as above). Also have excellent equine vet hospital about 20 mins box ride away.
From reading adverts it seems that sellers want their horses/ponies to go to places with all singing and dancing facilities and it makes me feel that what I can offer a potential purchase is a distinctly sub-standard sort of home - tbf my retirees do look a bit scruffy atm under their fly rugs and masks.
I see so many adverts saying so and so loves their stable and needs to come in at night and so on it makes me wonder what sellers are expecting from potential purchasers.
Thoughts?
I don't think there is such a thing.


A good home is

  1. somewhere safe for the horse to be stable and grazing
  2. somewhere where all the horses needs will be met.
  3. Good nutrition
  4. knowledgeable home
  5. teeth - farrier - vaccines done
  6. good clean bedding
  7. fields kept well
  8. lots of tlc from the owner




Who cares if you have amazing facilities or just a field, as long as the horse is healthy and happy and his or her needs are met.

My horses love their stable, that is because they love being in it ( food bedding etc) they always want to come in.





.
 

Annagain

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I'm selling now (well sales livery is) and all I care is that Charlie will be safe, loved, cared for and treated with respect.

I'm not arrogant enough to think the way I kept him was the only way (it would't really even be my first choice but the best compromise available in the area). It worked for me, it seems to suit him but I wouldn't insist on others doing everything the same way that I did or think they were any 'less' if they only had a field as long as the field was safe, had shelter (natural would be fine) and met his dietary needs - or they were supplemented. In the same way I wouldn't be impressed by incredible facilities if the person didn't seem to care about him.
 

hock

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It’s a real peeve of mine with folk saying horse sellers are greedy because they want a fair price for their horses and are being short sighted because home is more important than price. Well when I last looked those two things aren’t mutually exclusive. A 5* home is subjective isn’t it, to me it’s enough knowledge to spot a chronic problem and enough money and kindness to get it sorted out ASAP. Someone who has regular training and rides to a level to do the horse justice or be a quiet passenger. Good facilities, all year turn out, access to nice hacking and field mates. A genuine love for horses and a connection with mine and then mostly gut instinct. All this can change in the blink of an eye because people’s circumstances change but it’s wjat I aim for.
 

SEL

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People who are reasonable probably don't even realise how much of this goes on. i wouldn't dream of wasting someones time like that, if i enquire about a horse i am anticipating that i genuinely might buy it. but there are a lot of people who seem to be in la la land!
I told the lady I bought mine from that I'd know pretty quickly if he wasn't for me so I wouldn't waste her time if that was the case.

Saying that apparently I've been accused of being a time waster by someone else who cancelled a viewing on me twice and never got back to me. I haven't even seen the horse!
 

Red-1

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For me the OP would indicate a perfect home for some of my horses, and not for others.

If I sell (not often), I don't put 5* home or no timewasters, but I do vet homes well. That is by long discussion and/or yard visit, depending on level of neediness of said horse and also reason for sale. If the horse has done me a good turn but circumstances have changed, I do a yard visit. I really care! If a horse simply hasn't done what I hoped, a long discussion and photos will suffice.

Anything I have sold has gone to a superb home, kept in touch with all of them, photos and reports. I regard selling as a place where someone else gets to share in the adventure of that horse. happily, I haven't bought a bad'un, just ones that sometimes haven't quite fitted.

One of mine had sweetitch, unless the chalk pasture was also on a windy hillside, it wouldn't suit without access to a stable. One was better ridden on an arena after time off, lack of an arena would put me off there, unless said pasture was extremely well drained summer and winter. Rigsby needs time on a dry lot, as opposed to access to grass 24/7. Most of mine, however, would be fine in OP's set up.

I have sold one that I really hoped would go up through the grades, as I believed that to be their destiny. Not that the horse cares, but because it would give me pleasure to see how far the horse can go. It did well for a year, but sadly had an unexpected medical complication a year after I sold. I was sad, as I really hoped to visit Bramham to cheer them home - I think I would have actually bought a T shirt! Not as sad as the new owner, though, I'm sure.
 

Winters100

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As above really.
I am tentantively looking for an unassuming 14hish low level allrounder (pref 'fizzy' sort of mare) and sort of assumed that I could offer a good home.
I am an experienced and qualified light weight former professional and keep my 3 retired horses/ponies at home out 24/7 on chalk grazing with good fencing and access to a field shelter, adequate rugs if required and as much hay/ hard feed as necessary. They have regular farrier visits (6-8 weeks all unshod), dental care, vacs, worm counts etc. etc. and access to direct fantastic off-road hacking.
However I don't have stables (although I could secure one in an emergency about 75m away on a local yard) or an arena (though available as above). Also have excellent equine vet hospital about 20 mins box ride away.
From reading adverts it seems that sellers want their horses/ponies to go to places with all singing and dancing facilities and it makes me feel that what I can offer a potential purchase is a distinctly sub-standard sort of home - tbf my retirees do look a bit scruffy atm under their fly rugs and masks.
I see so many adverts saying so and so loves their stable and needs to come in at night and so on it makes me wonder what sellers are expecting from potential purchasers.
Thoughts?
Personally I would be delighted to sell any horse to you. Obviously there are other owners who might keep their horses in 'smarter' yards, but I have never felt a horse to be unhappy because of lack of a large arena / not so nice tack room / lack of pretty landscaping on the yard.
 
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