What sentence from a seller would stop you going to look at a horse.......

sidewaysonacob

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Joined
26 July 2011
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494
When I was last looking 7 years ago I rang up about just over 50 horses over a 9 month period and viewed 9 of them. Eventually found a superstar, but I had to be patient! The kind of thing that put me off on the phone was:
"Well, it's not technically my horse, I'm selling it for a friend"
"We've done a lot of parelli with him"
"He'd probably hack ok in a group but we've never tried"
"We only ever hack to the end of the lane and back"
"I don't jump him, but you're welcome to try"

When I actually turned up to try the likely sounding ones, two were lame, there was an all-rounder who repeatedly tripped over a 6" cross pole, a 6yo that the sellers hadn't mentioned had just been turned away for over a year, a biter, a leans-on-the-bit and a 15hh that was more like 14.1 🤦
 

Tonto_

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9 September 2019
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153
"Well he's never done THAT before!"
I've had this and I believe he never had done it before as he never has since!
My loan I asked him to canter when I went to try him and he decided he'd like to bronk! It was nothing I couldn't handle so I decided to loan him and he's never done it again so I believe he never had done that before, little monkey! The owner was very apologetic
 
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Slopping along on a loose rein somewhere in Devon
"Well you're welcome to come to view but he hasn't been ridden for a while and we're not sure where the tack is".

The other classic one is "well you're welcome to view but there's no-one here to ride him for you". That one has been done to death I reckon!

Another horrific excuse I encountered when I was looking was "well you're welcome to come and see but you'd have to bring him in yourself as the owner's working away all week".

Posters above have mentioned "natural horsemanship" horses: I went to see a youngster a few years back, the seller was supposed to be a "natural horsemanship" guru, in fact he'd got the fact that he was Mr Wonder-Guy printed in bold letters all over his landy, I wonder he didn't have it tattooed on his derriere as well just for good measure, he obviously needed to constantly overstate it, about as subtle as a tart in a nunnery. Before viewing I'd watched a video on You Tube of the horse I was going to see, being mounted. It was a typical youngster in that it was a bit iffy, but I was still prepared to view as it looked a decent enough sort. This video was in the May.

I went to see the horse later in the summer, say July/August I think it was. The horse was still being iffy to stand-up at the mounting block, there had apparently be no progress made whatsoever! Jeez, a rank novice could have improved the situation better than that!! And/or investigated any pain issues which might have been causing it. It was a shame as it was a decent enough horse, but was rude and bargy on the ground and that carried through into ridden work where it basically thought it was OK to trot and canter just where it thought it would!
 

ycbm

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Joined
30 January 2015
Messages
29,870
He only cribs a little bit.

He only weaves when food is being delivered.

He needs individual turnout.

Must live out.



Posters above have mentioned "natural horsemanship" horses: I went to see a youngster a few years back, the seller was supposed to be a "natural horsemanship" guru, in fact he'd got the fact that he was Mr Wonder-Guy printed in bold letters all over his landy, I wonder he didn't have it tattooed on his derriere as well just for good measure

Should we be worried that you appear to know he didn't 😂🤣😂?
 

DabDab

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Joined
6 May 2013
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9,530
"Well you're welcome to come to view but he hasn't been ridden for a while and we're not sure where the tack is".

The other classic one is "well you're welcome to view but there's no-one here to ride him for you". That one has been done to death I reckon!

Another horrific excuse I encountered when I was looking was "well you're welcome to come and see but you'd have to bring him in yourself as the owner's working away all week".

Posters above have mentioned "natural horsemanship" horses: I went to see a youngster a few years back, the seller was supposed to be a "natural horsemanship" guru, in fact he'd got the fact that he was Mr Wonder-Guy printed in bold letters all over his landy, I wonder he didn't have it tattooed on his derriere as well just for good measure, he obviously needed to constantly overstate it, about as subtle as a tart in a nunnery. Before viewing I'd watched a video on You Tube of the horse I was going to see, being mounted. It was a typical youngster in that it was a bit iffy, but I was still prepared to view as it looked a decent enough sort. This video was in the May.

I went to see the horse later in the summer, say July/August I think it was. The horse was still being iffy to stand-up at the mounting block, there had apparently be no progress made whatsoever! Jeez, a rank novice could have improved the situation better than that!! And/or investigated any pain issues which might have been causing it. It was a shame as it was a decent enough horse, but was rude and bargy on the ground and that carried through into ridden work where it basically thought it was OK to trot and canter just where it thought it would!
Oh yes that reminds me of one quirk that really puts me off - recently backed youngsters that don't stand still for you to get on. I don't care for the backing method that causes it.
 

honetpot

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Joined
27 July 2010
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6,100
Location
Cambridgeshire
My best pony was bought from a friend. He barged, bit, had seperation anxiety, didn’t load very well and had mid matched confirmation.
My friend is very honest and would tell anyone his faults, as did I when I loaned him out. He cost me more than any other horse or pony I bought but he was priceless.
I could loan him out but it’s doubtful she could have sold him out of PC where everyone knew of his patience with novices.
 

vhf

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30 May 2007
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1,040
Location
Cornwall
Some of my favourites (of many!!) "She's about 13hh, but she's only 5 so I'm sure she'll be big enough for you in time" - "He had an extra hoof as a youngster, but it's been cut off and he'll probably be able to do light ridden work" ... "Her name's Misery but she might be better with a job to do" - answering a Wanted ad for a 15.2hh youngster to back and bring on for RC competitions... . Wanted ads seem to bring out some fantastic sales talk.
 

annagain

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Joined
10 December 2008
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11,384
Wanted ads seem to bring out some fantastic sales talk.
I posted a wanted ad - asking for a horse within two hours of Cardiff. The first four messages I had back were from Leeds, Lowestoft, Glasgow and Middlesborough. I also said I had to have a gelding due to my yard being a geldings only yard and got offered 3 mares. I didn't get one offer that met all or even most my criteria.
 

ihatework

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Joined
7 September 2004
Messages
17,578
I posted a wanted ad - asking for a horse within two hours of Cardiff. The first four messages I had back were from Leeds. Lowestoft, Glasgow and Middlesborough. I also said I had to have a gelding due to my yard being a geldings only yard and got offered 3 mares. I didn't get one offer that met all or even most my criteria.
They are so so worth persevering with IMO. Yes you get all the dumb replies, but I have also got 3 very useful horses from wanted adverts.
 

LaurenBay

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15 November 2010
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5,261
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Essex
Not a novice ride - that is fine, but why not explain why. To me it means the Horse is slightly on the crazy side.

Never done that before - My Horses old owner actually said that to me at the viewing after the Horse chucked her off. I ended up buying her and she never did do it again. Inclined to believe the seller on that one, she looked very shocked.
 

Leandy

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Joined
4 October 2018
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677
"Quirky"

Really annoying in that it could mean absolutely anything. At least give a hint as to what the quirks are then I will have a clue as to whether they are acceptable or not..... gggggrrrrrr!
 

Leandy

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Joined
4 October 2018
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677
Recently also discovering that "recently passed a 5 stage vetting" usually also means "recently failed a five stage vetting". In that a potential purchaser had it vetted but it failed. The vendor therefore at some time later gets one himself so he can say it passed one. Vetting isn't an exact science of course and anyone would be a mug not to also get their own vetting but still, I've discovered this happens and it puts me off that phrase.
 

greenbean10

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Joined
11 May 2019
Messages
191
Not a novice ride - that is fine, but why not explain why. To me it means the Horse is slightly on the crazy side.

Never done that before - My Horses old owner actually said that to me at the viewing after the Horse chucked her off. I ended up buying her and she never did do it again. Inclined to believe the seller on that one, she looked very shocked.
I find it so funny when you read through the whole advert, 'snaffle mouth, rideable to a fence, great to hack alone and in company, never bucks rears etc, not sharp or spooky' and then at the end, 'not a novice ride'

WHY ???? WHAT DOES IT DO ?? Even when I'm not horse shopping I feel an urge to message the seller asking them to tell me exactly why this apparently perfect horse isn't a novice ride. I wouldn't call myself a novice but if someone feels the need to put that I would instantly think the horse is crazy.
 

beingachicken

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Joined
26 August 2011
Messages
314
I rang about a horse a few years ago. Ad showed photos of it in a lovely school, jumping and on a busy road.
It also stated no trial facilities. I called anyway they told me no facilities meant none at all. I said a corner of a field and stretch of road would do. Apparently they didn’t even have that!
 

Green Bean

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Joined
1 February 2017
Messages
379
I went to see a horse that had done SJ and XC with photos included in the ad. On arrival and riding it was very obvious that the photos were either from a lifetime ago or were another horse altogether. It was a plain bay so easily done
 
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29 September 2013
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2,953
'Selling for a friend'

I know some are genuine but it does make me think buying it will be a complicated mess, and an absolute nightmare if you needed to return it as unsuitable.
 
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