Which saddles have curved trees?

Coblover63

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.....please?

Current saddle (GFS Monarch) is too flat for her and bridges. She's a XW traditional cob so I'm just looking for a nice, second-hand, GP leather alternative that has a more curved tree. If it has a comfy seat for my bum, all the better, but it is more important that it fits her and is comfortable.

Many thanks.
 

Leo Walker

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.....please?

Current saddle (GFS Monarch) is too flat for her and bridges. She's a XW traditional cob so I'm just looking for a nice, second-hand, GP leather alternative that has a more curved tree. If it has a comfy seat for my bum, all the better, but it is more important that it fits her and is comfortable.

Many thanks.
Are you sure that shes not croup high and thats causing the bridging? The Monarchs arent flat treed saddles.
 

Coblover63

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Bridgnorf, innit!
Are you sure that shes not croup high and thats causing the bridging? The Monarchs arent flat treed saddles.
I don't think so, I know that's a common breed trait but I will check again. My previous boy was no-wither and flat backed and thus, noticeably croup high but my mare has a little withers and a more curvy shape.

In any case, how would you address this if she IS croup high?
 

AlexHyde

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Monarch's are fairly flat, but not super flat (have tried and sold one on and def wouldn't have said it was curvy).

Bates are curvy, as are Kent & Master S series I think. Best get a saddler out who has a good range and see what suits :).
 

sbloom

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There is a trade off between tree flatness and seat/panel length, plus tree width. I see way more bridging from too flat and long a panel (usually indicated by tall or long rear gussets), or a slightly too narrow tree (often a tree can be widened to slightly too wide, and flocking used to correct bridging)...a good flat tree will give more stability than a curved tree., The trouble is, if a larger seat size is required, you have to go to one with a higher pommel, and this leaves less space for a more open seat, which indicates flat rails, the bit that gives stability.

I would suggest looking for a more curved shape of panel rather than tree, and/or a short panel with smaller rear gussets, and the shortest seat size that would work well for you, with a slightly more forward cut flap if you need space for long legs, rather than a bigger seat. This is the same route I'd go for croup high, but it works for slightly dippy backed shapes, and the flat tree allows for the back to lift much better than a curved tree.

Are you working with a good fitter?
 

Coblover63

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Nope. The fitter told me it was fine and never mentioned the bridging....I noticed it myself. So I'm on the hunt for a new fitter! Mare is not croup high.

Which saddles have a more curved panel? I had a NPS Glen for my previous boy with an upswept panel, but I'm not sure that would be enough this time.
 

AdorableAlice

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Jaquar, but they won't be suitable for a heavy traditional in a month of Sunday's. I think you need a better advisor/fitter to help you.
 
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