Who is the Queen speaking to at Royal Windsor Horse Show?

Annagain

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Brilliant - she is getting her priorities right - much better than the state opening of Parliament - good on her 😀
So a jolly to a horse show is more important than her constitutional duty? Personally I think the fact we need a royal to open parliament is a bit of a farce but while she's being paid a hell of a lot of money by the tax payer to turn up and read something for 10 minutes, she should do it if she is physically able.

The physically able element is I assume the issue - if the walking distance through HoP was too great and she can be dropped off close to her seat in Windsor, then fair enough. If it's a case of having to pick and choose events as she's no longer able to do them all, those that serve the country should take precedence. If she's not able to / doesn't want to do that, that's fine but she then needs to abdicate. I don't think anyone would judge her for that at her age.
 

Red-1

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I am glad she got to see the show, it was lovely to see.

I don't think the two visits are comparable. I would find a trip to London, entering the chamber, presumably on foot, addressing parliament live, getting back out, and being driven back to Windsor, all very tiring and I am only 55!

The show is literally in her back garden. She was driven the extremely short distance and, from what I can tell, didn't exit the vehicle. She would have been back home again in a matter of minutes.

BTW - I have never questioned the Queen's sense of duty. After losing my mum and having an extremely quiet funeral, cut off from much of the family, I appreciated when she was dignified in seeing her own husband off whilst also following the rules. It made me shed a tear and feel less alone in my situation, seeing her as alone as I had felt, little black mask and a tear.

Can't say the partying of the politicians made me feel like I was joining people in sharing in the duty to keep everyone safe.

BTW - it was the first time she had missed it in 60 years, and she sent 2nd in line to the throne to act on her behalf. Not sure what other job would ask that of someone, not that I think it is just a job. It's not one I would want to do anyway.
 
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Widgeon

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I had assumed that a visit to a local horse show (where she has no duties, can be driven around, and leave when and if she likes) was rather lower pressure than the state opening of parliament, hence attendance at one but not the other. Also - surely Charles needs the practice! Regarding abdication though, it's a fair point, although it does appear that her health has become quite a lot worse really quite quickly. Maybe for some reason(s) she doesn't want to hand over just yet? Who knows. And when your life is your job (ie a vocation) it must be hard to make that decision - I'd be a bit concerned that she'd become one of those people who retire and then keel over a few weeks later. But I don't think anybody could dispute that she deserves a retirement.
 

meleeka

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So a jolly to a horse show is more important than her constitutional duty? Personally I think the fact we need a royal to open parliament is a bit of a farce but while she's being paid a hell of a lot of money by the tax payer to turn up and read something for 10 minutes, she should do it if she is physically able.

The physically able element is I assume the issue - if the walking distance through HoP was too great and she can be dropped off close to her seat in Windsor, then fair enough. If it's a case of having to pick and choose events as she's no longer able to do them all, those that serve the country should take precedence. If she's not able to / doesn't want to do that, that's fine but she then needs to abdicate. I don't think anyone would judge her for that at her age.
She has mobility issues and doesn’t want to be seen in a wheelchair, so I think it’s perfectly understandable that she missed the opening of parliament. Should we still expect her to earn her keep?? I think she’s probably done enough to earn her retirement and Charles is perfectly capable of stepping in. Its just nice to see her happy and smiling.
 

fetlock

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So a jolly to a horse show is more important than her constitutional duty? Personally I think the fact we need a royal to open parliament is a bit of a farce but while she's being paid a hell of a lot of money by the tax payer to turn up and read something for 10 minutes, she should do it if she is physically able.

The physically able element is I assume the issue - if the walking distance through HoP was too great and she can be dropped off close to her seat in Windsor, then fair enough. If it's a case of having to pick and choose events as she's no longer able to do them all, those that serve the country should take precedence. If she's not able to / doesn't want to do that, that's fine but she then needs to abdicate. I don't think anyone would judge her for that at her age.
There's a massive difference between (any 96 year old) attending Windsor (where she lives) to attending the opening of Parliament in London.

She doesn't need to abdicate either.
 

Annagain

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I already said that I understood there was a difference but if she has reached the stage where she is having to / wanting to prioritise then constitutional duties should, in my view, take precedence if she is still Queen.

If the second in line is going to more of these than she is then he may as well take over officially. There is no other job in the world where people are expected to work at 96 years old (as you mentioned Red). I have nothing against her personally and I'm not questioning her sense of duty but this notion of lifelong duty is so outdated and unreasonable in this day and age when people live so much longer.

Red you mentioned you're not sure what other job would ask that of someone, that's my point. My biggest issue with the monarchy is it robs people of any say in their lives. How many other jobs would you sign up for at birth and have to do until you die? Many monarchs in other countries (Japan and the Netherlands most recently) have stood down when they felt they couldn't carry out their duties to the extent they would like. The other side of that coin is that while we have the system we have, the public are also entitled to a monarch who is able to carry out the duties we've paid for.

For the avoidance of doubt I'm utterly appalled at the behaviour of those in government - I don't see how the two are linked to be honest other than one party taking place on the eve of the D of E's funeral. I'm sure the Queen has far higher moral standards and more compassion than those in power - I'm sure 99% of the population does - but I don't see how that's relevant here?
 

AandK

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State opening of parliament was Tuesday, the Queen was at Windsor today, apparently her first public appearance since March. Not sure how that is not prioritising constitutional duties, if she is not fit to do the former, does that mean she is not allowed out at all? Not seeing an issue here personally.
 

LeneHorse

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She has mobility issues and doesn’t want to be seen in a wheelchair, so I think it’s perfectly understandable that she missed the opening of parliament. Should we still expect her to earn her keep?? I think she’s probably done enough to earn her retirement and Charles is perfectly capable of stepping in. Its just nice to see her happy and smiling.
This - she looked like her old self in that photo. It was nice to see
 

Sandstone1

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After 70 years as Monarch she has more than done her duty to the Country. She will never abdicate and will be Queen until the sad day that she dies. Its completely understandable that other members of the Royal family take up some of her duties as age and health make it more difficult for her to undertake some responsibilities. She has been in a job she never asked for and will never retire from for 70 years. I for one do not begrudge her a trip to a horse show in her back garden.
 

Tiddlypom

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She has mobility issues and doesn’t want to be seen in a wheelchair, so I think it’s perfectly understandable that she missed the opening of parliament. Should we still expect her to earn her keep?? I think she’s probably done enough to earn her retirement and Charles is perfectly capable of stepping in. Its just nice to see her happy and smiling.
This.

How exactly was a frail and proud 96 year old with mobility issues going to access the centre stage she needed to be sitting on to open parliament? Hoist her up? Strap her in and bump her up in a wheelchair?

6BB13B65-97C2-4B9D-842F-79CF2812F0E0.jpeg

It's lovely to see her enjoying herself at Windsor.
 

SEL

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After 70 years as Monarch she has more than done her duty to the Country. She will never abdicate and will be Queen until the sad day that she dies. Its completely understandable that other members of the Royal family take up some of her duties as age and health make it more difficult for her to undertake some responsibilities. She has been in a job she never asked for and will never retire from for 70 years. I for one do not begrudge her a trip to a horse show in her back garden.
Absolutely

And the constitutional duties were met by Charles and William in line with due protocol if the Queen couldn't attend.
 

The Fuzzy Furry

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She was looking very well today. She watched her Highland win its class, watched the supreme in hand championship and then the Fell pony parade immediately after, led by Lady Louise driving her pair.
I was v chuffed to be able to ride in front of her today, almost exactly 50 years since the 1st time I did same.

To compare a 4 minute drive from front door to seating to a parliament visit is completely nuts....
 

HashRouge

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I also think there is something strategic manoeuvring going on behind the scenes. We are essentially being prepared for the day when the Queen dies and Charles takes over, and getting him to do things like the Queen's speech gets us all used to seeing him in the role as king. It will help to ensure a smooth transition so that republicans like me will be unlikely to get our way ;)
 

teapot

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Anyone who’s been to the Palace of Westminster knows what a right royal pain in the arse it is to walk into/around, let alone when you’re 96.

I love the fact she’s only coming out for ponies now! As for her duty, the woman’s done more in duties one way or another for the best part of seventy years, is that not enough?
 

Gingerwitch

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This.

How exactly was a frail and proud 96 year old with mobility issues going to access the centre stage she needed to be sitting on to open parliament? Hoist her up? Strap her in and bump her up in a wheelchair?

View attachment 92582

It's lovely to see her enjoying herself at Windsor.
She could have ridden onebiv her horses lol... can just imagine it giving a giant fart at the two faced party leaders. Frankly the horse would have my vote lol
 

Peglo

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Seems a bit harsh. You can’t wheel that wheel chair around parliament to speak to a bunch of clowns so off to the retire home for you. And no you can’t go to the horse show. You can watch from the upstairs window.

I’m happy she can finally pick and choose what duties she wants to attend after years of (what I imagine would be very boring) service and glad to see her looking so well.
 

scats

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I’m very fond of the queen and it was so lovely to see her out enjoying watching her horses with a huge smile on her face. I wish the remainder of her time could be spent doing the things she enjoys, she blummin’ well deserves it after all her years of service.
 

Pearlsasinger

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Seems a bit harsh. You can’t wheel that wheel chair around parliament to speak to a bunch of clowns so off to the retire home for you. And no you can’t go to the horse show. You can watch from the upstairs window.

I’m happy she can finally pick and choose what duties she wants to attend after years of (what I imagine would be very boring) service and glad to see her looking so well.

And although she didn't attend HoP, she has been wfh so I rather think that, at 96, she deserved a day off playing ponies and chatting to old friends.
 

SO1

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I think she may step down after the jubilee.

I agree going to the show which is in her garden is far less tiring than a ceremony in London where there are steps and if she has limited mobility then unless the disabled access is very good it may be a struggle. Additionally she may be following medical advice regarding what she can and cannot do.
 
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