Why would anyone want to own a tb?

GemG

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9 January 2014
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Because nothing beats a good TB .
They move like nothing like silk being pulled through water .
They have ten canter gears .
They look divine .
Because a good one is such fun to train .
Because you can out gallop the rest of the field at the hounds .
They are so versatile .
Sure they might be the best horse to go to war on but then who wants to go to war .
The ultimate pro horse that's the TB .
Absolutely!

I recall about 15 years ago using a TB (belonging to someone else) he was an ex eventer unraced (he had a sensible head actually) as an escort hack (yes; I know!) at a yard I worked at. I still have vivid memories of us all having a 'little canter' up a stubble field, and I went through about 8 canter gears, slipped into an effortless gentle gallop and raked up the hill - I couldn't (wouldn't) stop him, not at all because he was in any way unstoppable. It was just pure heaven!!! He was gorgeous.

I don't have a TB - but I would consider a good one for sure!

But have a Part bred Trak (TB of the WB world!)
 

GemG

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...there is a TB mare ownder by a livery on our yard who has had every single accident going, legs all shapes and is a total opinionated moo mare! ... But she looks so beautiful I enjoy just looking at her!
 
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Hard to tell if this is tongue in cheek or not.

If it is:
Well people own TBs because they are allergic to the feel of money in their hands, it makes them go into anaphalatic shock, so they need a dosh-hoover that eats £50 notes for breakfast to fund its bute addiction, to solve the issue of having to touch anything with more value than a 20p piece.
Duuuhhhhh(!)

If not tongue in cheek: well my mum's ex racer licks your hands when something worries him, he shoves his forehead against your torso and headbutts you till you offer him a flat palm to lick to soothe himself. He is adorable, plus has a stunning-stunning-stunning floaty trot but is so easy to handle, a true dope on a rope.
 
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Besides look how handsome Alfie is (the aforementioned ex racer): TBs make great eye candy even as field ornaments! (which Alfie, mud fever prone and after tweaking his tendon twice, practically is)

I mean this is what I imagine Bucephalus would look like! (well he was an akhal-teke but still whatever).
http://i.imgur.com/3dafE9H.jpg
 

windand rain

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My first horse when I was 15 was an Irish TB he was wonderful safe sane and just perfect jumped like a stag which was his undoing he jumped out of his field and was killed on the road the car driver also died it is 50 years ago and I still have nightmares
 

tashcat

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I didn't realise quite how special they are before having one for myself. He may have some typical tb characteristics, but my god is he a diamond and I'm so glad he fell into my lap. I would happily have another in a heartbeat. For the record he has rock hard feet, can be quite a lazy chap, and is the most affectionate and inquisitive character.

Granted they can have their issues, but what horse doesn't? Look how often TBs are crossed with other breeds! I think there are too many in the wrong hands and too many poorly treated (either through ignorance or neglect) or on the other hand overfed. So the problem with TBs is us and not them.

But then I've never been a cob girl, and would never have one for myself so I can see why others would want to avoid TBs. Different type of rider.
 

MagicMelon

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See, now I wonder why so many people want to own a warmblood! Oops did I just say that outloud...!! Ha ha! (and no Ive never owned a pure TB but usually have a TB x, Ive had two warmbloods).
 

rubyroo92

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Guess you will always find pros and cons of owning any breed.. i work with TBS yes they take a lot of looking after and we do have the vet out now and again .., i still cringe when i see then galloping around the field on their matchstick legs.. but then they are a lovely breed to ride and are versatile ..
 

MrsElle

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I have always avoided TB's like the plague. Then a friend asked me if I would look after one for her as her rescue was full.

I fell in love!

Mind you, she is the least TB-y horse I have ever had. Calm, kind, not stressy, lives on fresh air, great feet, has a max of a MW rug on, even in the depths of winter. She lives out 24/7/365 as she prefers it to being stabled. She isn't shod and goes between three and six months before needing a trim. Her only real fault is that she doesn't load after being beaten onto a lorry before I got her. She is better than she was, but still a royal pain in the backside to get on. Once on she travels like a dream.

We have had the vet out once, when I first got her and had her shoes off and she got an abscess. That was four years ago now I think.

She's fab :)

 

MeltingSnowflake

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I must have been lucky, but every TB I've ridden or had were absolute dreams! And they're such lookers! To be fair, mine was TB x Connie - she was so calm, never a diva, never mareish, never unsound. There really needs to be a heart emoji :)
 

windand rain

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I must have been lucky, but every TB I've ridden or had were absolute dreams! And they're such lookers! To be fair, mine was TB x Connie - she was so calm, never a diva, never mareish, never unsound. There really needs to be a heart emoji :)
you were very lucky indeed as the connie we had is the biggest diva on the planet. I love TBs but can't manage big horses now I am old and broken
 

pixie27

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I've always always loved TBs but never owned one. Until a few months when I accidentally bought one (and didn't realise he was a TB until looking at passport on the way home).

He is without doubt the most wonderful creature in the world. He's insanely handsome, he's affectionate (more like a big dog), he's an absolute people person (but gets on with all horses), he's bold and inquisitive - his default reaction to new things is to march over and investigate. He's calm, sensible and a rock in all kinds of traffic (have had an oil tanker and tractor plus trailer overtake us, while a train came up behind and he didn't so much as flicker an ear). He's athletic and learns so quickly in the school, and cantering out hacking is a dream - there is nothing in the world like a TB who takes the bridle and canters 'off' with you. He's easy to handle (my OH does loads with him), and when he does step out of line, it doesn't take much to reassert manners.

But yes I do constantly worry about his twig legs and his sensitive skin. I've seen my vet more since owning him than in all my years of riding (although his issue wasn't lameness related, just because he's a petal). Everything I own is covered in dead sheep. And I'm already saving up for how much hay he'll need through the winter. He's quick to learn where he can get an inch and take a mile - he's had four homes before me and is only six. We had a few issues with him being an idiot when I first got him, but once he realised he couldn't get away with it, he's been an incredible partner.

In the wrong hands, TBs are probably awful. But in the right ones - well, I'll never have another breed of horse again.
 

Tnavas

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Because they are amazing horses - kind, generous, brave, versatile, look at the number of eventers that are TB's. In New Zealand many, many riders have TB's.

They are not all accident prone, weedy, skinny or difficult to feed - I had several in my riding school, kind and patient, taking great care of their riders.

They are horses and like all horses are subject to various types of behaviour - I've seen Welsh ponies that like to stand in fences, didn't eat well or ran off with their rides.

My CLydesdale lives of the smell of an oily rag yet a friend has one that she needs to feed extra to year round.
 
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