Worming a herd

Miss L Toe

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I had my boy tested ... 200epg, so will worm, but the others have not all been tested, so owner thinks they all need wormed together, this seems to go against the idea of worm counting, if mine needs worming but another has a clear count, is it not OK to only worm infected horse?
 

ILuvCowparsely

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Depends really on when they were last wormed.

What I do here is worm count everything. If some have low worm count or no eggs seen I don't tend to worm them unless.

A. the owner wants me too
B. its that time when certain worming must be done (red worm- tape worm)

We pick up droppings daily so I know the low count is legit. Normally the only one that maybe high or some eggs is usually the new liveries.

So I would say no if the pasture is well maintained, I would advice them too worm count and go from there. If some have no eggs then I would only worm those who need it. Because if they decide on worming because you are they are not worming according to the results in their horse, for example if one has a high count and they only worm with one wormer its not enough and should double dose.

Worm according to results in the individual and not based on another results.
 
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Goldenstar

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You need to worm count all at The same time then treat all those need it on the same day .
This helps to keep the worms on the pasture to a minimum so your YO is right but would it do any great harm to slip yours the wormer no but it is better to take droppings all on the same day worm all on the same day.
It's so long now since I had one showing any wec that I do worry sometimes it seems to good to be true .
 

Miss L Toe

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Yes I know I need to worm him and to keep him in overnight, but I don't see any point in testing some of them [both clear] and then worming all of them. I am not paying, but at last yard I was at, only the positives were wormed.
It is not my yard, but I wanted my horse wormed if he needed it, regardless of the others.
 

SO1

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I am on the intelligent worming scheme as are most of the others in my pony's field. We do not all do worm counting and worming on the same day as all the horses individual plans are based on when they started the scheme and their worm counts.
 

Miss L Toe

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I am on the intelligent worming scheme as are most of the others in my pony's field. We do not all do worm counting and worming on the same day as all the horses individual plans are based on when they started the scheme and their worm counts.
Exactly what I thought, now YO is wanting me to use moxidectin which is for encysted redworm, and not for Strongyles which is what he has got.
I wish I had never said anything, and just got on with it, or I may tell her I have done it and hope she does not find out.
 

Miss L Toe

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You need to worm count all at The same time then treat all those need it on the same day .
This helps to keep the worms on the pasture to a minimum so your YO is right but would it do any great harm to slip yours the wormer no but it is better to take droppings all on the same day worm all on the same day.
It's so long now since I had one showing any wec that I do worry sometimes it seems to good to be true .
Incomprehensible sentences here, I would take my horse out of pasture overnight to prevent poison and dead worms going on the pasture. The idea of all treated on the same day is a relic of the "worm four or five times a year" system so beloved of veterinary practices [pre internet] as it is so profitable, and has inevitably led to wormer resistance.
 

CMMB

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At 200 epg I certainly wouldn't be bothering to worm a fit adult horse. Moxidectin will do Strongyles (it does everything except tapeworm). However I would not advise using moxidectin in summer, in my opinion it should be reserved for winter worming when you need to target inhibited small redworm. The mantra is "every time you worm you select resistant parasites".

I suppose it is up to the other owners if they wish to do a wec. Quite often on shared grazing some horses will all have low counts but one or two for their own peculiar reason will have higher counts - and they are the ones contributing to the majority ot the larval challenge on pasture.

Can I just comment on the myth about not wanting adult worms to be expelled on pasture after worming. It really doesn't matter - they are dead - they don't produce any more eggs!
 

Miss L Toe

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I disagree with the YO but as she has her own ideas, I try to avoid arguments, obviously she does not ask me for advice!!!
The whole idea of egg counts is to select those animals which need worming to be wormed, none of them are "in a bad way".
I agree that moxidectin should be used sparingly, and my boy has not had it for 2 + years, I have bought both wormers, but I think I may worm with ivermectin, and throw the moxidectin packaging in the bin!
I will keep him in overnight to stop poison being put on the grazing, and also to monitor health.
 
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CMMB

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I agree if you are dealing with a YO who will not consider new ideas it can be difficult. Unlike Moxidectin, Ivermectin does not have any affect on the insect life in pastures and therefore there is no need to keep horses in after worming for that reason (unlike the suggestion for moxidectin - the data sheet recommends 3 days after - somewhat excessive I think if it is just one horse being wormed). You just need to be sure of limited access to water courses with both as they are aquatotoxic.
 

Miss L Toe

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I agree if you are dealing with a YO who will not consider new ideas it can be difficult. Unlike Moxidectin, Ivermectin does not have any affect on the insect life in pastures and therefore there is no need to keep horses in after worming for that reason (unlike the suggestion for moxidectin - the data sheet recommends 3 days after - somewhat excessive I think if it is just one horse being wormed). You just need to be sure of limited access to water courses with both as they are aquatotoxic.
There is a river!
 
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