Would you buy a horse that has had Kissing spines surgery?

LJF0664

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As the title really, horse had the surgery a few years ago, so fully recovered. My gut says it wouldn’t be an issue, but though I’d consult the oracle that is this forum!!
 

brighteyes

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Would you x-ray on a vetting to look at the likelihood of it developing? It's a big 'thing' here in the UK but on the continent, they just treat it with steroids and carry on. I know a few people over here who do that routinely.

Personally, not if I wanted a high level of performance and/or no more vet bills than would be generated normally. If money were no object and I had the necessary to retire it once it was finished in its job, yes.
 

Fern007

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Saw a bay horse advertised, had op in 2018. Seems to be going well, lovely to watch on the video. Vet report was Available. Must admit if I was looking I would have definitely considered him.
 

Regandal

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I’d be very wary. There are 2 different procedures I think, one involves shaving the processes so they no longer touch, other one is snipping the ligaments between the processes, to loosen them.
Not sure that there’s much evidence on the long term success of the snip.
 

Palindrome

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It depends. If I wanted a happy hacker with a fab temperament and the horse fitted that I would. For jumping, schooling or any strenuous work I wouldn't as I would constantly be worried that the horse might be in pain. This wouldn't be about the horse's capabilities though, I am just naturally a worrier.
 

ycbm

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For the right price with a long history of doing the work I wanted it to do and a very convincing reason for sale, with a trial period, I might.

Regarding controlling them with steroids, the steroids lasted only weeks before my horse was bucking again.
.
 

milliepops

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Not unless it gave me access to a class of horse that I wouldn't otherwise be able to afford, and then only if the horse had returned to the work I wanted it to do. In my case I'd be able to square if it if brought a high level competition horse within budget.
 
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Just wondering what sort of hacking terrain the people who would - theoretically - consider the horse as a happy hacker have?

Here is very hilly, so I wouldn't consider such a horse as suitable. I've known horses who just cannot walk straight down the hills and sort of walk diagonally and slightly crabbish because they have sore backs.
 

Lipglosspukka

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Just wondering what sort of hacking terrain the people who would - theoretically - consider the horse as a happy hacker have?

Here is very hilly, so I wouldn't consider such a horse as suitable. I've known horses who just cannot walk straight down the hills and sort of walk diagonally and slightly crabbish because they have sore backs.
We have no hills. It's actually quite frustrating in terms of getting them fit because hill work is so valuable. My hacking consists of country lanes, forestry enclosures and open forest. We do have ditches etc but can easily avoid them.
 

RachelFerd

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Yes I would, without much hesitation. If the price was reflected, and I was reassured by owners that rehab programme had been followed, it wouldn't concern me much at all.
 

LEC

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Yes I would, without much hesitation. If the price was reflected, and I was reassured by owners that rehab programme had been followed, it wouldn't concern me much at all.
Depends on the horse. I wouldn’t with a 4/5yo as never seen a single one who had done nothing go in to do anything but would on a horse who had been doing the job and then had KS diagnosed for right money.
 

misst

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I'm with Melody Grey on this. It's not always an isolated problem and I'd be waiting for the next problem along the line to rear its ugly head. Changes in rider and workload can affect KS as well.
 

Red-1

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If I had ridden it and my gut said it was no problem. If the horse was consistently doing what I wanted already. If the price reflected the issue. If I could be mindful that the horse could be retired/pts very soon after. Then, yes.

The biggest one is my gut saying it was no problem. If I was not confident to forget it and get on with enjoying the horse, then there is no point.
 

AUB

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If horse had been in full work for years after, if all it’s medical records were disclosed to me so that I was sure it didn’t have related issues and if it could pass the vetting with flying colors, then I see no reason not to.
 
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