Would you buy/LWVTB horse with significant conformation defect?

MiJodsR2BlinkinTite

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As title really.

Don't want to say too much on here, but I've a chance of a horse which, on first viewing, I like the temperament of.

However, it has quite a pronounced goose-rump which whilst it doesn't affect the horse's ability, isn't something that you can ignore, because it is quite pronounced. I'm not aware that it has effected the horse's way of going up till now, and I wouldn't be wanting to show it or compete other than mebbe the odd days hunting or pleasure ride.

Apparently the owner has tried to sell the horse without success and is now seeking long-term loan home. There would I think be an option to buy at some stage.

I'm due to see the horse again for a second viewing soon; I could walk away now......... but, oh dear, there IS something about this horse that I like. Head -v- Heart are having a real battle right now.

WWYD peeps???
 

Spoiled cob

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If it doesn't affect its way of going and doesn't cause a problem with what you wanted to do ie showing and you liked the horse, personally I would go for it.
 

chaps89

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What has horse been doing up until now? If similar level of work or harder than you would be doing for a sustained period of time with no problems I'd go for it, especially if on loan. If unproven/been out of work/in light work I'd be walking away as no way of knowing if it would stand up to what you'd want.
 

poiuytrewq

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Yes, lwvtb that way I'd hope to see for myself if it caused any problem.
I think really liking a horse is very important so I'd allow other non perfections
 

rachk89

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Might it just be caused by lack of condition/muscle? My friend bought a horse recently that arrived looking fairly thin although not neglected, it was just lack of condition and muscle through no work all year. She gave it lots of conditioning feed and has ridden it like 4-5 times a week. Goose rump is now gone. Might be different circumstances of course, but something to think about.
 

ycbm

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When I was young, I was told by old horsemen that a goose rump (not high tuber sacrale) - a pronounced slope down to the tail - was a sign that the horse would be a good jumper because of the angles of the bones. It used to be a lot more common than it i is these days. I can't remember the last time I really saw one.
 

Leo Walker

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When I was young, I was told by old horsemen that a goose rump (not high tuber sacrale) - a pronounced slope down to the tail - was a sign that the horse would be a good jumper because of the angles of the bones. It used to be a lot more common than it i is these days. I can't remember the last time I really saw one.

Same here. I can think of lots of conformational problems that would have me running for the hills, but not this unless its horrendous? If it is horrendous then it might well be a sign of an underlying problem
 

splashgirl45

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go with your gut feeling....loaning is not as risky as buying so why not try him and see. you could always get him vetted if you felt you wanted to buy him, if the owner hasn't been able to sell him previously you will probably get him a bit cheaper. if it is lwvtb, then agree a price at the beginning and have it in writing, sometimes a loan horse can change for the better in a new home with a bit of schooling and good food so worth making sure the price doesn't go up due to your work...good luck and let us know what you decide...
 

Nicnac

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Yes - exracehorse has gooserump especially noticeable at this time of year coming out of winter - ok he was a pants racehorse, but had him 9 years now and his butt has never caused an issue.

How old is the horse and what's he done? Very low risk (apart from emotional) taking on LWVTB.
 

Damnation

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I'd go for it.

I have known two horses with significant conformational defects in their back.

One had a high wither then his back sloped down from his wither by about 6-8 inches then back up to his bum which was in line with his withers. He competed PSG dressage at 18.

I knew a goose rumped horse who was a very good all rounder.

I think if you spend the time to ensure the back muscle is always at a decent level you should be ok.

YCBM - I also heard that Goose Rumped horses were good show jumpers.
 

MiJodsR2BlinkinTite

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OK.... thank you for your comments everyone.

The "rump" is quite pronounced. Obviously I can't post pictures of it on here but my anxiety would be that it would affect his ridden work and/or cause an underlying issue like bucking or napping.

Yes - before committing to buy I'd deffo get a vet and chiro check to see what's what.

I'm going to see him/ride again so plenty of time to think; owner wants the right home so no-one in a hurry.
 

Fun Times

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My horse has S.I joint issues and his "bump" gets more pronounced when the problem flairs up and he loses muscle tone because he isn't "using" himself correctly. So because of my direct experience with this issue, I personally would be cautious.
 

MiJodsR2BlinkinTite

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Um, actually it is WORSE than this, much worse. Having looked at additional photos of the horse, there are other conformation defects. I regrettably cannot post a picture on here of the horse in question as don't want to identify either it or the owner.

I've asked around my circle of friends/professionals/longterm horsemen, and all of them have said without exception to pass this one by as there may be issues to do with remedial shoeing, saddle fitting, etc etc., and later on possibly pain-related behavioural issues.

All of which I want to avoid if possible.

It is a shame, but there it is. He's such a lovely boy too...........
 
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