Yay! Went bitless today!

Waffles

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 July 2011
Messages
1,034
Location
Cardiff
I don't know how often I'll keep doing it, but I'm really chuffed my horse (who I've had for 6 months) went really well - just chucked on the hackamore and went out for a couple of hours, plus we had our very first jump over a log. Just wanted to share it!
 

Waffles

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 July 2011
Messages
1,034
Location
Cardiff
Thanks! I wasn't really worried. I had about 5% anxiety I'd say. i rode my last 2 horses in a bitless, but yes, you never really know how they will react! I prefer bitless riding out hacking as I like to go on long rides in the summer and it means I can let him rest and graze if I want.
 

Waffles

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 July 2011
Messages
1,034
Location
Cardiff
Right.... potted history here... first used an english hackamore in the 70s when I had an ex racehorse who put his tongue over the bit in gallop and was unstoppable - had a few accidents smashing through fences etc. bought the hackamore then and that worked. I tried it on my next horse (mid 90s - section D) as he used to pull like mad, and I had about the same amount of control. Current horse has a very light mouth in eggbutt snaffle - (also section D) so I figured I'd just try it and see how he went - if anything better - and yes, brakes worked. With my last horse I once said to someone "Actually I have more control when bitless, you should try it on yours" - her horse had a sore mouth or something at the time - anyway, went out riding with her, my horse took off flat out, jumped loads of fallen trees (it had been windy and all this was totally unexpected) - was completely out of control. At the end of the woods, I turned round to see the woman on her horse visibly shaking. She never rode with me again! Current horse is a different temperament though :)
 

Waffles

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 July 2011
Messages
1,034
Location
Cardiff
also, the woman I ride with regularly uses a Dr Cooke bridle - she said her horse really hated the bit and he used to tank off all the time, but the Dr Cooke one works for her and the horse. I love the feeling of freedom with a bitless and dare I say it.... trust :eek:
 

RoobyDoobs

Well-Known Member
Joined
22 November 2011
Messages
156
Right.... potted history here... first used an english hackamore in the 70s when I had an ex racehorse who put his tongue over the bit in gallop and was unstoppable - had a few accidents smashing through fences etc. bought the hackamore then and that worked. I tried it on my next horse (mid 90s - section D) as he used to pull like mad, and I had about the same amount of control. Current horse has a very light mouth in eggbutt snaffle - (also section D) so I figured I'd just try it and see how he went - if anything better - and yes, brakes worked. With my last horse I once said to someone "Actually I have more control when bitless, you should try it on yours" - her horse had a sore mouth or something at the time - anyway, went out riding with her, my horse took off flat out, jumped loads of fallen trees (it had been windy and all this was totally unexpected) - was completely out of control. At the end of the woods, I turned round to see the woman on her horse visibly shaking. She never rode with me again! Current horse is a different temperament though :)

Hahaha poor woman!!! Right decision made... Once we've got through the initial stages of barefoot... Bitless is next! I love the au natural way to do things!!!
 

Waffles

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 July 2011
Messages
1,034
Location
Cardiff
Ha ha - indeed, the hackamore doesn't have a bit but does have a curb action. My horse is barefoot - unintended really - he'd never been shod, has really good feet and my farrier says he is fine (at least at the moment) without shoes.
 

stargirl88

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 June 2010
Messages
1,319
ooo I'd love to go bitless....... always a bit more tempted when I see posts like this :D

and I know there's a 30-day money back trial thing on the dr cook. Oooooo.
 

Oberon

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 May 2009
Messages
7,241
I'm delighted that the barefoot thing is saving lots of money more than anything. If he gets sore or whatever, I will get him shod though!
Bet you'll ask yourself WHY he's sore first though ;)

Barefoot AND bitless....slippery slope to bunnyhugdom


 

Waffles

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 July 2011
Messages
1,034
Location
Cardiff
Bet you'll ask yourself WHY he's sore first though ;)

Barefoot AND bitless....slippery slope to bunnyhugdom


Yes, well - he'd be sore from having his hooves worn down too much from too much riding for the particular terrain we are riding on. He's not a bunnyhugdom horse.... i'd probably like him to be though:eek:
 

MagicMelon

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 November 2004
Messages
15,282
Location
North East Scotland
Ha ha - indeed, the hackamore doesn't have a bit but does have a curb action. My horse is barefoot - unintended really - he'd never been shod, has really good feet and my farrier says he is fine (at least at the moment) without shoes.
Just because it has a curb action, this works on the nose not the mouth. It is bitless. Being technical, your horse is actually unshod if its trimmed by a farrier as they trim in a way thats to put a shoe on. I have 2 who are properly "barefoot" in that they are trimmed in a particular way by my barefoot trimmer. My competition horse however who is trimmed by my farrier is simply unshod.
 

Waffles

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 July 2011
Messages
1,034
Location
Cardiff
I assumed that as my farrier knows I am riding unshod that he trims in such a way that is sympathetic to riding unshod. Actually, he doesn't really need to trim at all as my horse's hooves are wearing down from riding - he just sort of tidies them up and makes sure they are symmetrical etc.
 

amandap

Well-Known Member
Out to Pasture
Joined
23 June 2009
Messages
6,949
Bet you'll ask yourself WHY he's sore first though ;)

Barefoot AND bitless....slippery slope to bunnyhugdom


:D

Good on you op. Being old and crumbly I'm very safety conscious, so I'd like to suggest that anyone making a switch to bitless works in a safe enclosed area first, to make sure the horse understands the signals and you have effective communication going.
 

Waffles

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 July 2011
Messages
1,034
Location
Cardiff
:D

Good on you op. Being old and crumbly I'm very safety conscious, so I'd like to suggest that anyone making a switch to bitless works in a safe enclosed area first, to make sure the horse understands the signals and you have effective communication going.
That's probably a good idea - especially if you haven't used one before!
 

Waffles

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 July 2011
Messages
1,034
Location
Cardiff
I suppose it depends very much on the horse and how you ride really. I've never found it made much difference to control - just had to indulge in a bit more neck reining and body weigh shifting
 

Waffles

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 July 2011
Messages
1,034
Location
Cardiff
I didn't take it as a criticism, so no worries. I was probably a bit mad to just bung it on yesterday and go out, but there we go.....just thought I'd take the bull by the horns!
 
Top