A little advice needing on stopping techniques...

Lauraoscardillon

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Me and my sister have just got a new horse. we already had a pony, whos 14.2 and very forward going, but as hes smaller it hasnt proved to be a problem as hes not very strong.

we love our new horse and hes settled in wonderfully. hes a really sensible, keen type and iv had about 5 people get in contact with me from their yard and people who knew him as they miss him so much! hes hunted and evented in his last two homes. hes 15.2 Connemara x tb.

hes really keen to try and everything and hes a real sweetheart. however once he gets going he sometimes can be tricky to stop. hes not silly about it, but tends to slow down into a slow canter rather than come back to trot. he is much stronger than our pony, so i understand we need time to get used to him.

he is ridden in a dutch gag on the second ring, (the same as our pony incidentally) with a flash and martingale.

this is not a major issue, nor is it particularly dangerous. However out about about its nice to know you can avoid dog walkers and particularly at xc he tends to get more excited! as i said hes not silly, he just wants to go!

any special tips? half halting doesnt seem to have much effect!
 

Bowen4Horses

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my grandpa once taught me how to stop an unstoppable horse... but not sure how well it'll translate into print, so i'll give it my best shot.

get hold of one rein (eg right rein) quite short, then holding tightly onto it, clench your fist and jam that fist into the horse's neck, so it can't get yanked out.

then using the other rein, pull it as if you want your horse to do a really really tight circle. so, in a sense, you're only actually 'pulling' on one rein, the other one is just shortened and jammed so it won't move.

i used to have a very strong section d, and this worked when he bolted. i'd sometimes end up pulling so hard that i'd be right up in my stirrups. but, it defo defo worked for me.

good luck!
 

LauraWinter

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Lots and lots of transition changes in the school, teach him to respond to your seat with your hands a secondary aid. Boring and time consuming but I would say worth a try... Also, when you want him to trot rather than canter, move as if you were moving to a trot rather than a canter- ie 'rise' as you would in a normal rising trot rather than sit top the canter. You might look and feel peculiar at first but gives good results. Try putting him in a french link or similar while you're doing this in the safety of the school and you might find just a change of 'feel' for him helps. Hope that helps, good luck!
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Just to add, another thing to try is circling, reasonably small (I guess that depends where you are riding at the time) rather than persisting in using your hands if he is not not stopping as it will be very difficult for him to carry on and stop him from using your rein aids to 'fight' against you. All these things helped on my mare who had similar probs and I had changed her from a kimblewick, grackle and martingale she had when she came to just a snaffle
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AmyMay

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Do you speak to the horse - i.e a quite Woah. Also exhaling slowly and relaxing the seat should also slow if not stop the horse.
 

emma69

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Get 'heavy' in the saddle, use your weight on his back to slow him.

Use your voice - wooo---aaaaahhh (down inflection) and steaaaaa-ddeeee.

Keep your paces collected, so you never get to the 'out of control' point.

Firmer half halts, used consistently.

Different bit.

2 reins.

Using the rein of your strongest hand, take it, and push it down across to wards your opposite foot (on the 'wrong' side of the neck). I am not keen on this, as it yanks the bit in their mouth, but sometimes you need to stop (roads, etc).
 

Lauraoscardillon

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thanks everyone!

in the arena hes an angel, perfect transitions up and down, listens to your seat and hand aids as well as voice as required.

we speak to him if he wont stop, saying his name more than anything, perhaps trying the whooa will be better.

the opposite hand to foot might have to come in as a last resort, eg at roads as you said or a dog walker!

we were planning on doing lots of walk and trot around areas we would usually gallop so he understands open space doesnt equal gallop. however as he is used to a hunting and eventing home i dont see why open space/grass should excite him cos he is very used to it. similarly at his old home he was strong when i galloped, but at the same time i trotted all the way around the field with another horse and he didnt try and pull at all

im wondering if new surroundings are just quite exciting for him!?

x
 
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