Advice on bringing horse back into work.

Tinseltoes

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Hi
My cobblet was proffessionally broken in as a 7 year old and is still green due to the fact he hasn't been ridden much,when he was,he was quiet and good as gold.Hes been turned away for 2 years as I had previously lost my confidence (long story,basically I got on him and he took off,lost balance and fell off and hurt myself,so then I decided he was getting broken in properly so sent him off to be proffessionally broken in).),well now I feel confident enough.Should I long rein and or lunge him? He is rising 10.
Advice needed as don't have anyone to give me a helping hand.
Thanks
Sharon
 

zaminda

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I would gradually reintroduce him to tack, thn some lunging, and leading around the local area. If you have had confidence issues I would pay a proffesional to sit on him the first few times, there are usually a few advertising in local tack/feed stores.
 

Tinseltoes

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Thanks for that. He was broken by a proffessional and she had me riding him whilst he was with her.I fell off BEFORE he was properly broken in.The tack doesnt bother him as he's been having it on loads of time.
I will lunge him,he's not keen on long reining and tends to have a tizzy fit (spins around) lol
 

Miss L Toe

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One F and two ss es
You need an assistant, the horse will be pretty strong and may not want to become a riding horse!
He needs to learn to long rein, this is a resistance, it is a basic requirement that he does what he is told!
 

zaminda

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That sounds familiar! One of mine used to spin round until she wrapped herself in the long reins then stand there and look at you! Sure you will be fine after a couple of sessions. Enjoy the riding
 

imogen345

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I always make sure I have someone on the ground when bringing a horse back into work or riding a new horse. Many occasions it has been helpful too. Give a hay net when tacking up and constantly make it fun and rewarding.

You may want to lunge, but not for too many weeks as you don't want the horse fit before getting on for first time. It would be sensible to get a training programme, and start at foundation phase. If you start by simple walking, hacking and building it up, you will probably re-establish yourself together which will be nice.

It upsets me to see owners sit on their horse in silence, never rewarding or being pleased with their horse. If you have a horse that can be potentially difficult, I read an amazing book...

'Ride from the Heart" By Jenny Rolfe.

This has been my bible. I've recently got a new horse and when she gets in a hissy, I give a big sigh. I didn't believe the book at first when it was telling you the way you breath plays a huge role, but it really does.

Rewarding and making it fun once again is the key factor too! If your horse thinks this riding malarkey brings him an over happy owner that seems ridiculously ecstatic about the smallest and easiest things he does, positive thinking will lead to a good communication.

Hope it goes well, stick at it and never rush as the slower we produce horses the greater the result.
 

Miss L Toe

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Don't you ever wonder what all the top dressage people do every day with their horses, they are world class riders, yet still take five years to produce top results, when all they need to do is break them in, turn then away for two years then jump on their back for a couple of hours!
 

Spyda

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OP: Do you have someone who can help you? A competent friend? Someone who'll be happy to walk out with you and help from the ground. Two pair of hands is definitely a BIG help.

Also, once he's back being ridden do you have someone with a sane horse who can accompany you out for a few gentle hacks to help boost both your confidences (yours and your horse's).
 

Tinseltoes

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OP: Do you have someone who can help you? A competent friend? Someone who'll be happy to walk out with you and help from the ground. Two pair of hands is definitely a BIG help.

Also, once he's back being ridden do you have someone with a sane horse who can accompany you out for a few gentle hacks to help boost both your confidences (yours and your horse's).
I know of a girl who might help me,if I can get hold of her. Ive long reined and lunged on my own before.Its the getting on him that Im wary about.He is a lovely boy.
I may ask her next week. If not my friend (none horsey) will help me out.Ie hold him whilst I lean over him etc.Don't need to be led. My daughter 13 has been on him on lead rein and he was quiet enough but that was last time he was ridden. The fact I had a bad knee didnt help much. Don't know anyone else who would help.
Thanks everyone.
 

Spyda

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I know of a girl who might help me,if I can get hold of her. Ive long reined and lunged on my own before.Its the getting on him that Im wary about.He is a lovely boy.
I may ask her next week. If not my friend (none horsey) will help me out.Ie hold him whilst I lean over him etc.Don't need to be led. My daughter 13 has been on him on lead rein and he was quiet enough but that was last time he was ridden. The fact I had a bad knee didnt help much. Don't know anyone else who would help.
Thanks everyone.
My 13 year old son helps me with mine! He's my spare pair of hands :) My horse is just coming back into work, too.

I don't need to be lead either but it does help to get them going on the long-rein having someone walk beside them, if they're inclined to be a little less than willing to keep going foward on their own. Like someone else on here said, it's also a matter of manners that your horse does what you reasonably ask. Getting him to walk out on the long-reins is a good place to start - but do keep safe obviously. Having someone walk beside his head to get him going and keep going the first few times, will help him stick to the plan.

I expect, like mine, your horse will need to build up muscle again to carry a rider comfortably. Long reining helps, as well as getting them used to being out and about again. Lunging is fine too, in moderation. You dont want your horse too fit! But getting them to reach and stretch on the lunge once or twice a week for 10 to 15 mins should help build the right muscles. I worked from the ground walking out in hand, long reining and light lunging sessions a few times a week before riding out at walk. We're only at the very beginning of our fittening regime, still only walking. I ride out around the lanes for 30 to 40 mins at walk (lots of hills) and lunge twice a week for about 15 to 20 minutes (walk and some slow energetic trots). In the next week or two I'll build up to an hours walking and then start introducing trot. I'd rather start slow and get them properly fit. It'll take about 8 weeks to get mine as fit as I'd like her to be :)
 
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Tinseltoes

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My 13 year old son helps me with mine! He's my spare pair of hands :) My horse is just coming back into work, too.

I don't need to be lead either but it does help to get them going on the long-rein having someone walk beside them, if they're inclined to be a little less than willing to keep going foward on their own. Like someone else on here said, it's also a matter of manners that your horse does what you reasonably ask. Getting him to walk out on the long-reins is a good place to start - but do keep safe obviously. Having someone walk beside his head to get him going and keep going the first few times, will help him stick to the plan.

I expect, like mine, your horse will need to build up muscle again to carry a rider comfortably. Long reining helps, as well as getting them used to being out and about again. Lunging is fine too, in moderation. You dont want your horse too fit! But getting them to reach and stretch on the lunge once or twice a week for 10 to 15 mins should help build the right muscles. I worked from the ground walking out in hand, long reining and light lunging sessions a few times a week before riding out at walk. We're only at the very beginning of our fittening regime, still only walking. I ride out around the lanes for 30 to 40 mins at walk (lots of hills) and lunge twice a week for about 15 to 20 minutes (walk and some slow energetic trots). In the next week or two I'll build up to an hours walking and then start introducing trot. I'd rather start slow and get them properly fit. It'll take about 8 weeks to get mine as fit as I'd like her to be :)
Thanks Spyda.Before he was sent off to be broken in ,I long reined him and he was doing his spin.
Last time I long reined him he was well behaved but thats when he down there being broken in,but on one occassion he did decide he wasnt going forward lol I then when I rode him out it was at walk only.Hes lazy and pretty laid back. Just wondering if he will remember what he was taught,as I always thought they never forget!
Thanks for the advice.
 

Littlelegs

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Can't quote on phone but if you are 'wary' about getting on then don't, a nervous rider on a green horse will do more harm than good. Either send him away again or get in experienced help to come out to you. Another thought- have you rode regularly in the 2 years he's been turned away? If not some lessons might restore your confidence to ride him yourself when the time comes.
 

Tinseltoes

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Can't quote on phone but if you are 'wary' about getting on then don't, a nervous rider on a green horse will do more harm than good. Either send him away again or get in experienced help to come out to you. Another thought- have you rode regularly in the 2 years he's been turned away? If not some lessons might restore your confidence to ride him yourself when the time comes.
No I havent ridden in two years.Think I will get some lessons to get my confidence back.
 
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