Am I a novice rider?

The Fuzzy Furry

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Sorry, I have a horrible tendency to shorten British showjumping to British showing! I know this can be very misleading, especially on here! I should have corrected it sooner!
Ok, in that case I really recco you go and get a more appropriate horse as your 1st horse, particularly one that is schooled towards sj.

I really do not recco an off the track tb as a 1st horse, not to anyone and definitely not to a young person without parental back up. Sorry but it's a car crash waiting to happen.
 

SO1

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I would be very careful about what sort of horse you purchase because of your age, unless of course you have a lot of money.

Owing a horse can be time consuming and costly. At your age you may want a career or a social life with friends, if you have plenty of money and can therefore pay someone to help with horse care and can afford to keep the horse should you loose interest then there is limited risk. If not then you need something that you can sell on if you loose interest or get a sharer for you if you lack time or need some extra financial support.

This is your first horse, you don't even know if you are going to like the responsibility and decision making that comes with owning a horse. If you buy an ex racer and then decide horse ownership is not for you then they are not the easiest horses to sell on, especially one that is not a novice ride.
 

jessica6880

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You asked originally if you needed 'steering away' from a tb which quite a few people have suggested you should, and then just commented to say instead you intended to ask where to source one? Little bit confused what you're after with this thread OP!

What do you mean by 'training' the RS ponies? Could you possibly expand on that a bit more?

I wouldn't personally recommend a tb - and I'm grateful I didn't get one until owning my fourth horse as there is so much more to owning a tb than being a sufficient rider imo.
Yes! Absolutely! I must apologise as I am not being clear at all! It’s entierly on me. The riding school I worked at specialised in training and producing class showjumping horses. I have therefore been taught a fair bit on how to train them. Naturally, many where warm bloods or Irish sports horses with a few rescues or projects thrown in so I am aware thoroughbreds would be very different. What I am objecting to is the fact that because I have never owned a horse, I am automatically assumed to know nothing when this is not the case. I am trying to explore my options here as I am looking for a project of my own. If it appears thoroughbred are not the breed I will look elsewhere. I am interested in experiences and temperaments of those who have trained. May I ask why you wouldn’t recommend one despite having owned one? Thank yoj
 
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OK, so you want to jump. I would suggest that you look for a nice jumping schoolmaster/mistress and worry less about the breed. You need something that is forgiving and knows the ropes, then you should have a good match for your first horse that you will enjoy.

I think that ex-racers can be tempting to new owners because they are often a good looking horse for a smaller amount of money, but there are real and valid reasons for this. Picking the right one is a very skilled thing and that is an area that you are inexperienced in at the moment.
 

jessica6880

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I would be very careful about what sort of horse you purchase because of your age, unless of course you have a lot of money.

Owing a horse can be time consuming and costly. At your age you may want a career or a social life with friends, if you have plenty of money and can therefore pay someone to help with horse care and can afford to keep the horse should you loose interest then there is limited risk. If not then you need something that you can sell on if you loose interest or get a sharer for you if you lack time or need some extra financial support.

This is your first horse, you don't even know if you are going to like the responsibility and decision making that comes with owning a horse. If you buy an ex racer and then decide horse ownership is not for you then they are not the easiest horses to sell on, especially one that is not a novice ride.
Yes! Thank you. This is something I must consider! Whilst I am yet to loose interest, my life is fast approaching so this is a very valid point! See, I am looking definitely for a project and most I have seen are thoroughbreds, that’s why I am angled that way. Are there any breeds in particular you would recommend?
 

jessica6880

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OK, so you want to jump. I would suggest that you look for a nice jumping schoolmaster/mistress and worry less about the breed. You need something that is forgiving and knows the ropes, then you should have a good match for your first horse that you will enjoy.

I think that ex-racers can be tempting to new owners because they are often a good looking horse for a smaller amount of money, but there are real and valid reasons for this. Picking the right one is a very skilled thing and that is an area that you are inexperienced in at the moment.
Thank you for your reply! I think, because I have seen and taken part in the training of horses, I am eager to do the same. I would like to put my stamp on a horse though, and, unfortunately, I find many schoolmasters to be looking for a quieter life that I feel I would not be able to offer. I wonder if there is a middle ground?
 

Mari

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What ‘help’ will be available to you if you need some support? It’s really hard going it alone especially when issues crop up that you have no previous experience of. Are your family supporting you in this?
 

windand rain

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I have retrained loads as eventers not all have made it the reasons I wouldn't suggest one for you is as I said above they are not good frst horses unless you are extremely lucky. They take far more looking after and are far more likely to break than most types in fact I personally would reccommend a Welsh cob they are challenging to ride, talented showjumpers and come in a fair size horse. They are also hardier and far easier to in the main than to keep than a tb They are also not too expensive if bought through the sale ring
 

tashcat

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Yes! Absolutely! I must apologise as I am not being clear at all! It’s entierly on me. The riding school I worked at specialised in training and producing class showjumping horses. I have therefore been taught a fair bit on how to train them. Naturally, many where warm bloods or Irish sports horses with a few rescues or projects thrown in so I am aware thoroughbreds would be very different. What I am objecting to is the fact that because I have never owned a horse, I am automatically assumed to know nothing when this is not the case. I am trying to explore my options here as I am looking for a project of my own. If it appears thoroughbred are not the breed I will look elsewhere. I am interested in experiences and temperaments of those who have trained. May I ask why you wouldn’t recommend one despite having owned one? Thank yoj
I'd recommend them through and through - for the right rider in the right circumstances!

I'm just not sure why you're so centred on getting a certain breed - it might make more sense to search for characteristics that might suit you? Such as 'safe in traffic' or 'travels well'.

What do the RS think you should get?

Schoolmasters certainly are not always after quieter lives, and it is possible to put your 'stamp' (a horrible phrase - riding is a partnership, not domination.. it sounds like you're buying a house not horse!) on any horse by building a lovely working partnership together.
 

jessica6880

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What ‘help’ will be available to you if you need some support? It’s really hard going it alone especially when issues crop up that you have no previous experience of. Are your family supporting you in this?
Yes! And my friends. As childish as it shounds, my friends are the typical horsey sort so are willing to lend a hand. As mentioned above, family friends and distant relatives have experience
 

jessica6880

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I have retrained loads as eventers not all have made it the reasons I wouldn't suggest one for you is as I said above they are not good frst horses unless you are extremely lucky. They take far more looking after and are far more likely to break than most types in fact I personally would reccommend a Welsh cob they are challenging to ride, talented showjumpers and come in a fair size horse. They are also hardier and far easier to in the main than to keep than a tb They are also not too expensive if bought through the sale ring
Thank you very much! This is a very viable option! I think I will have a hunt around and investigate! Thank you!
 

jessica6880

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I'd recommend them through and through - for the right rider in the right circumstances!

I'm just not sure why you're so centred on getting a certain breed - it might make more sense to search for characteristics that might suit you? Such as 'safe in traffic' or 'travels well'.

What do the RS think you should get?

Schoolmasters certainly are not always after quieter lives, and it is possible to put your 'stamp' (a horrible phrase - riding is a partnership, not domination.. it sounds like you're buying a house not horse!) on any horse by building a lovely working partnership together.

Sorry, again I am not centred on a breed. As mentioned in another reply, thoroughbreds around here are the go to project horses, and I happen to have an interest. In reality, whilst I would love this, I am looking for a project. My riding school thinks I am more than capable for any project, when I have run the thoroughbred idea by them, they said they had hoped for me to look atan ISH or warm blood as that is what they know. However, these are rare in my area and the school tend to source them abroad, an option that is not a posisbilitiy for me, hence I’m looking elsewhere. Riding is evidently a partnership, but it’s hard to describe what I’m looking for without such harsh words.
 
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Have you ever part loaned? This would give you more experience as a ‘horse owner’ and could also give you good references when you decide to get your own. It’d also give you even more time to save up for a horse that you’d really love!

Personally, I wouldn’t sell a horse to someone who’s fresh out of a riding school, with parents who aren’t ‘horsey’ either, as I think there’s still a lot to learn that you just don't get from a riding school.

Also are your parents prepared to help? At 18 you’ll probably want to go out on nights and spend time with your friend and you’ll need to make arrangements to have your horse be sorted out the morning after. Before Harley was on full livery, my mum was kind enough to sort him out on a Sunday morning after a night out for me. I also ask about your parents due to the financial commitment that a horse is. I’m 19 and there’s no way I’d be able afford Harley if my mum didn’t help me.

I’ve been in a similar position to you at 15 as I didn’t think I was getting enough from a riding school, which is when I discovered part loaning. I truly understand how frustrating it is (especially with non-horsey parents!) but you’ll get there one day!x
 

jessica6880

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Have you ever part loaned? This would give you more experience as a ‘horse owner’ and could also give you good references when you decide to get your own. It’d also give you even more time to save up for a horse that you’d really love!

Personally, I wouldn’t sell a horse to someone who’s fresh out of a riding school, with parents who aren’t ‘horsey’ either, as I think there’s still a lot to learn that you just don't get from a riding school.

Also are your parents prepared to help? At 18 you’ll probably want to go out on nights and spend time with your friend and you’ll need to make arrangements to have your horse be sorted out the morning after. Before Harley was on full livery, my mum was kind enough to sort him out on a Sunday morning after a night out for me. I also ask about your parents due to the financial commitment that a horse is. I’m 19 and there’s no way I’d be able afford Harley if my mum didn’t help me.

I’ve been in a similar position to you at 15 as I didn’t think I was getting enough from a riding school, which is when I discovered part loaning. I truly understand how frustrating it is (especially with non-horsey parents!) but you’ll get there one day!x
Hi! Thank you for your understanding! I have shared horses when I was 12, however feel as though I want a bit more hands on. Most of my friends are off to Uni this year so I can see my nights out going down dramatically. The novelty is starting to wear off. Similarly, I have, over the past 3 years been working. My most recent weekend job at primark has enabled me to save. I don’t want to state how much on here as it feels a bit odd lol but it’s a rather large amount and I intend on keeping the job throughout. My parents are keen to help out, with friends too. The problem I have, as you understand, is I want more than just riding. I want, as cliche as it is, to create a bond that sharing or riding schools didn’t give me
 

criso

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they said they had hoped for me to look atan ISH or warm blood
That would be my first thought as something that has potential to show jump, tbs aren't really built or bred for pure show jumping. I would have said a nice irish horse for what you want.

Are you not in the UK though, both irish horses and warmbloods seem to be pretty common everywhere. They are more expensive than tbs though.
 

be positive

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You are 18, taking a gap year and want a horse to enjoy, for some reason, possibly financial, you are looking at 'projects' and finding they are 'not novice rides', the term project should be self explanatory, most will have either physical or behavioural issues, quite likely both, as your first horse why take on a problem, not that all ex racehorses will be a problem as such but the input required, both financial and practical, will be immense and the rewards may be rather slow coming, look for a horse that should do the job you want and make your 'project' training the horse to be the best it can be starting with a relatively clean slate rather than a history to overcome.

I think there is a tendency towards taking on other peoples failures in the hope of proving something but it can be a very expensive learning curve that may not be fun, can be soul destroying and needs to be carefully thought through, can you afford to treat any ailments that do not show up at vetting, can you afford to retire or be hard enough to pts if it does not work out, busy yards can take more risks by taking on a few and discarding any that fail to make the grade for whatever reason, the one horse owner will find this far more difficult.
 

jessica6880

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TBH, if you have to ask the question , the answer is 'yes!'.
Perhaps you should ask an adult who knows you well at the Equestrian Centre, what they would class you as, out in the wide world, rather than in the rarified atmosphere of an RS.
Thank you! It’s hard because of my work with them and the responsibilities they give me. I will ask but I think it’ll be bias
 

TPO

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In response to your question yes you are a novice rider.

I love TBs/ex racers and have owned a few. I would not recommend them as a first horse. Some can be quite high maintenance to keep; partly due to breed, partly due to past (often regimented) life and partly due to the stresses and strains that being in racing puts on them mentally and physically.

While a fan of the breed and there are many, many excellent TB jumpers andex racer isnt the first type that springs to mind for someone wanting to BS.

I'd recommend loaning an allrounder so you can experience the responsibility and expense of owning with a "get out" clause. See how you get on with something experienced that can show you the ropes before diving in head first with a project.
 
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jessica6880

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You are 18, taking a gap year and want a horse to enjoy, for some reason, possibly financial, you are looking at 'projects' and finding they are 'not novice rides', the term project should be self explanatory, most will have either physical or behavioural issues, quite likely both, as your first horse why take on a problem, not that all ex racehorses will be a problem as such but the input required, both financial and practical, will be immense and the rewards may be rather slow coming, look for a horse that should do the job you want and make your 'project' training the horse to be the best it can be starting with a relatively clean slate rather than a history to overcome.

I think there is a tendency towards taking on other peoples failures in the hope of proving something but it can be a very expensive learning curve that may not be fun, can be soul destroying and needs to be carefully thought through, can you afford to treat any ailments that do not show up at vetting, can you afford to retire or be hard enough to pts if it does not work out, busy yards can take more risks by taking on a few and discarding any that fail to make the grade for whatever reason, the one horse owner will find this far more difficult.
Hi! Thank you for your reply! I know finance has come up a lot in the replies. I prefer not to go into the extent of money, but it is not a problem.
 

jessica6880

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That would be my first thought as something that has potential to show jump, tbs aren't really built or bred for pure show jumping. I would have said a nice irish horse for what you want.

Are you not in the UK though, both irish horses and warmbloods seem to be pretty common everywhere. They are more expensive than tbs though.
Oh really? I seem to find it really hard to find them! Maybe I’m looking in the wrong places
 

jessica6880

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In response to your question yes you are a novice rider.

I love TBs/ex racers and have owned a few. I would not recommend them as a first horse. Some can be quite high maintenance partly due to breed, partly due to past (often regimented) life and partly due to the stresses and strains that being in racing puts on them mentally and physically.

While a fan of the breed and there are many, many excellent TB jumpers and ex racer isnt the first type that springs to mind for someone wanting to BS.

I'd recommend loaning an allrounder so you can experience the responsibility and expense of owning with a "get out" clause. See how you get on with something experienced that can show you the ropes before diving in head first with a project.
Hi! Thank you for you reply! I will consider this, however would prefer not to loan.
 

sport horse

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I own and breed show jumpers and have been involved with the sport all my life and that is a long time! Thoroughbreds are not the horse of choice for the sport. They can be ( not are) quite difficult, they do not always have the best canter from which to jump (as you will know as you have been invoved with producing show jumpers the canter is paramount as it is the approach to the fence that dictates how good the jump is) and they tend to jump a bit flat (rather than the bascule which as you know having produced show jumpers is the desirable trait) Having said this there are a few (very few and getting less and less as the years pass) that have made reasonably good show jumpers.

If you came to me for advice, I would head you towards your nearest British Show Jumping Accredited Coach and ask for their help. Alternatively, this Riding School that produces show jumpers. who you have helped should surely be now helping you. Whatever you do, do not take your hard earned cash and go visit anyone without expert advice. You are 18 years old and you have never owned a horse. Yes you are both a novice owner and novice rider. I really hope that you accept this and find a good adviser. Please heed the saying 'a fool and their money are soon parted'. This saying was born in the horse world! You have been advised and warned!
 

Pearlsasinger

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Hi! Thank you for your understanding! I have shared horses when I was 12, however feel as though I want a bit more hands on. Most of my friends are off to Uni this year so I can see my nights out going down dramatically. The novelty is starting to wear off. Similarly, I have, over the past 3 years been working. My most recent weekend job at primark has enabled me to save. I don’t want to state how much on here as it feels a bit odd lol but it’s a rather large amount and I intend on keeping the job throughout. My parents are keen to help out, with friends too. The problem I have, as you understand, is I want more than just riding. I want, as cliche as it is, to create a bond that sharing or riding schools didn’t give me

Primark must have started paying a heck of a lot more than when I last looked - unless of course you have been the managing director every weekend?
 

TPO

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Yeah that's a good point actually.

You ride/work/produce at a RS that specialises in show jumping so why aren't you speaking to them about buying from them? I'm sure a SJer producing RS, who have horses you ride and produce, will be able to source you a suitable horse no problem...
 

be positive

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Hi! Thank you for your reply! I know finance has come up a lot in the replies. I prefer not to go into the extent of money, but it is not a problem.
You seem to be missing the valid points in most of the replies, mine did not say it was just for financial reasons you seemed to want a cheap project but it often is, I have picked up many projects over the years, some bought some sent for training, most had been bought by reasonably competent people with good intentions but they so often end up going wrong, my view is to buy the best you can and at least start out with a clean slate not with someone else's cast off, my preference would be to buy from a small breeder who has brought up a well mannered young horse ready to go out into the world, if money is no problem start with something that is not an obvious problem from day 1.
Take someone with genuine experience with you to view, ideally the experts you are riding for at the moment who are the obvious choice to offer advice and take your time to find the right horse.
 
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