Am I going mad? What's wrong with this picture (video)?

BBP

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Please tell me what you see. Huge apologies for the videoing, it's the perils of having no-one to help you and doing it super early before traffic means I can't get to the arena.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=lrUyYyLL7Z0

He went in to the vets last week and was trotted up on concrete, lunged and ridden but showed no evident lameness...but he was as high as a kite on adrenaline. They thought perhaps the stress of headshaking/allergy may be causing so much tension in his back that it's making him lame when the adrenaline isn't up. I'm starting to think I have munchausen by proxy with this horse.
 

be positive

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Totally wrong behind, he is very stiff through his back with none of the movement he shows on another video I just looked at to compare he doesn't look "lame" on one leg more bilateral coming from high up so I could see that he may appear sound if lit up and stressed.
 

BBP

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Thanks! That's exactly what I'm seeing! Was starting to think I'd gone mad. I'd taken him in to the vets thinking they had better facilities for trot ups but he was just too worked up. He hurt his sacroiliac a year ago and I've been trying to persuade people it's still a problem. I'll get them to come and see him at home. The one thing that everyone has said is that his back feels like a piece of wood. He had an osteo vet out just over a month ago and felt incredible afterwards but then had a few mad field sessions, allergy kicked in so generally stressed and tense and is now lame again.
 

BBP

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I watch him and just want to cry. This is exactly where I was a year ago. Then he got ulcers from it which I fixed. In Feb he was sound and happy. Now it's square one again. Just want to give him a magic hug that fixes him.
 

Michen

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I watch him and just want to cry. This is exactly where I was a year ago. Then he got ulcers from it which I fixed. In Feb he was sound and happy. Now it's square one again. Just want to give him a magic hug that fixes him.


I feel so bad for you. Your posts just remind me of what I went through with Torres. The endless research, different problems, highs and lows. In and out of the vets.

Honestly? I think I would find a retirement place for him in a nice big herd roaming over a large acerage for a good year and then see how he was. I wish I had done that sooner for Torres rather than messing about with diagnostics. Something is going on with that little horse and I think taking a step back will be good for you both.

Massive massive hugs, what a lucky boy to have you as an owner x
 

BBP

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Ive been having those sorts of thoughts. I don't give a toss about riding, I just want him to be happy. Trouble is there is nowhere I know of close enough with the sort of set up I'd want for him. And I don't want to leave him for anyone else to deal with. He's been seperated from his buddies for the winter (yearling and 18 year old companion pony) as they race and play all day and created a total bog which I didn't want him running through but the second the ground dies out I'm going to put him back with them in as much space as I can (we have plans for big track system once hay is cut). He can just chill (although this is his problem, he doesn't just chill, he races and spins and leaps and falls over a lot whilst racing).

I've already told vets I don't have funds for tonnes of diagnostics and I don't want to stress him.

On the bright side, I started him on antihistamines on Monday and already I think he is less stressed by the pollen, his eyes are a bit brighter. Today will be a good test as its hot and bright sun.
 

Tnavas

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Totally wrong behind, he is very stiff through his back with none of the movement he shows on another video I just looked at to compare he doesn't look "lame" on one leg more bilateral coming from high up so I could see that he may appear sound if lit up and stressed.

Totally agree, horse looks very stiff behind, tail is held rigid. Keep on with the chiro, be prepared to have him in weekly for a time. Muscles need to be rebuilt to ensure everything stays in line
 

junglefairy

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I would find a different vet, your horse looks very sore.

My local equine vet also said my horse was sound and she presented similarly to yours, but was less stiff. I tried a different vet (a very experienced and highly regarded vet) who said that she clearly had very very serious underlying problems. Sadly she's now retired.
 

ihatework

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Sometimes, as much as you would like to, you just can't fix things. I've followed your posts - you have done your utmost, far more than many others would have done. My advice (having been in not to dissimilar a position) is to save your sanity. Stop the analysis, back off the horse / retire and take each day as it comes. You know the horse well enough to be able to tell if he is coping or not. I'd be looking at a maintenance dose of painkiller (although appreciate bute might be out because of ulcers) and just leave him be. Big field and company.
 

BBP

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To be fair it's not really the vets fault. He really did look sound on Friday, completely different to this video and to how he looked the day before. Adrenaline gives him super powers and I couldn't see anything of this soreness in him that day. There was no point blocking etc if you couldn't see the difference. They said they'd come to see him at home. I've just sent them this video. It's hard as I don't want to spend a fortune diagnosing him (he's cost me £5000 since insurance cancelled last year) so it's not really that I don't want to, just that there's a limit to available funds. I've contacted Rob Jackson (The horseback vet) who treated him in February, and Richard Maxwell who does bodywork, I feel really lost.
 

Meowy Catkin

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I have to agree with Ihatework. Turn him out with a herd, in a big field for a year and see what you have at the end of that. Even better if the field is undulating terrain.
 

MrsNorris

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Agree with others, turn him away and let nature take it's course for a year, obviously making sure he's not deteriorating. You need a break from all this, you've already gone above and beyond for him, take a step back and reassess in a years time. Sometimes all that is needed is a lot of time.
 

BBP

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Anyone want to offer me a big beautiful hilly field with lovely friends and rough grass suitable for fatties?! Preferably with caravan so I can live with him??
 

Wagtail

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Sometimes, as much as you would like to, you just can't fix things. I've followed your posts - you have done your utmost, far more than many others would have done. My advice (having been in not to dissimilar a position) is to save your sanity. Stop the analysis, back off the horse / retire and take each day as it comes. You know the horse well enough to be able to tell if he is coping or not. I'd be looking at a maintenance dose of painkiller (although appreciate bute might be out because of ulcers) and just leave him be. Big field and company.

This. I would retire him without a doubt. You are not alone. I have watched people try to fix a horse for years, spending tens of thousands on them and just hitting one hitch after another. Hell, I've done it myself. It is totally soul destroying. To me, although he is very sore, he doesn't look terribly unhappy. Retire him and take the pressure off yourself. One or two bute or danilon per day and see what you have in a year. I really do feel for you, but some horses cannot be fixed.
 

BBP

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He is still pretty happy, in fact very happy if the antihistamines work. Once I'd taken this video he spent a merry 20mins pushing his football around the arena and occasionally bouncing on it, rearing at it and showing it who's boss!
 

Wagtail

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He is still pretty happy, in fact very happy if the antihistamines work. Once I'd taken this video he spent a merry 20mins pushing his football around the arena and occasionally bouncing on it, rearing at it and showing it who's boss!

Aw bless him. An unhappy horse certainly wouldn't do that!
 

Dexydoodle

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He looks similar to my mare, I had the same spiel of shes not lame enough to block. Long story of how we got to that point, but after she bucked me off out hacking when I asked for canter (she was cleared to ride after hock injections as they found a little arthritis in her hock and thought that might be causing the shortness and to be fair she came 'sound' after the injection) they agreed there was something up and took her in for investigations. Nerve blocked the offside hind (only one she looked short on) and it made her properly lame on the nearside hind. Turns out she was bilaterally lame so she only looked a bit short as she was lame on both.

Don't know what investigations you've had etc and know you say you're out of insurance. Not recommending one thing or another - I'm not experienced enough, just sharing my experience of the 'not lame enough to block' as it could be a similar reason.

Really hope you find a way forward (be that investigations or turning away/ retirement) soon, he is rather lovely!
 

HashRouge

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Mine used to trot like this before she was retired - she has some sort of sacroiliac injury too. Vet could tell as soon as I out her into trot on the lunge! She has improved massively since retirement. She's probably not sound, but she's happy enough in the field. No bute needed so far either, she just has the occasional sachet if I think she isn't looking too great. She was already in her twenties by the time it became a problem though, so retirement wasn't the end of the world.

Just a note on Richard Maxwell - I really like him, but I don't think his diagnostic/ treatment techniques will help much with this.
 

AShetlandBitMeOnce

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I am confused why posters are agreeing that he is clearly in a lot of pain, bilaterally lame has been said too.. and then the suggestion is to find a big field and turn out for a year..

I understand that to turn out and leave well alone could do some good but I would not be wanting to just throw a horse that is in a lot of pain, into a field for a long time. I would be wanting to bring in and bute if necessary
 

touchstone

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Gentle movement within the horses own comfort levels is often far better than being brought in where the horse tends to stiffen up. It allows muscle to gently build without the pressure of being worked and causing more problems.
Giving pain relief can also be counter productive as the horse will over use any injury if it is feeling better thus risk worsening matters. It is also far better for most horses mental health to have the freedom to do as they please and socialise with other horses.

A horse in obvious severe pain is different and requires urgent treatment.
 

BBP

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Also, and I haven't decided what to do yet, there is no reason why turning out in a field with a herd would mean I couldn't bring him in every day. If I retire him (even temporarily) he will get treated just the same but without being ridden.
 

AShetlandBitMeOnce

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Sorry, I was going on the assumption that they were recommending that you send him away for a bit. Thanks for the answer touchstone! I would just be worried that the horse tends to fly about a hooley (although I suppose this would subside as he settles in, or that he would be chased/bullied/have to follow the herd at their pace.

Makes sense though, I am just a bit of a soft touch with some things! :D
 

ihatework

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Also, and I haven't decided what to do yet, there is no reason why turning out in a field with a herd would mean I couldn't bring him in every day. If I retire him (even temporarily) he will get treated just the same but without being ridden.

You could. But I feel you might be doing this for your needs (meant in the nicest possible way). Sometimes you just need to relax and back off a bit in order to be objective.
There will be somewhere out there that will offer what he needs, but you might need to accept this won't be on your doorstep and you might need to relinquish a little control. Tough I appreciate when you are so heavily invested emotionally in a horse
 

Meowy Catkin

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I understand that to turn out and leave well alone could do some good but I would not be wanting to just throw a horse that is in a lot of pain, into a field for a long time. I would be wanting to bring in and bute if necessary

Turning away doesn't mean that you ignore/abandon it. When mine was turned away for a year and a half she was still checked twice a day minimum, fed, groomed, received medical treatment when required etc...
 

Slightlyconfused

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Anyone want to offer me a big beautiful hilly field with lovely friends and rough grass suitable for fatties?! Preferably with caravan so I can live with him??

GG on here had a retirement yard I think. She has put up a thread a while back about the renovation into a posh yard.

I agree he looks wrong behind. Kind of like my boy last year. I have him six months off in a feild and he still didn't come right under saddle but was happy to hoon in the feild.
Sadly his laminitis caught up with him again in Dec and he was pts.

I agree I think.you both need a break, to turn him away and just let the dust settle.

Sending hugs.
Xx
 

Mince Pie

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Anyone want to offer me a big beautiful hilly field with lovely friends and rough grass suitable for fatties?! Preferably with caravan so I can live with him??

I can think of the perfect place, except it's in Cornwall! I hope you get things sorted with him, but - and I hate to say it - with funds running out and problem after problem I'd be thinking about make 'that decision'. I know he's bright and perky but having several chronic health conditions myself it really isn't much fun when it's one thing after another after another :(
 

stencilface

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I would find a good retirement yard somewhere and let him go to someone who will look after him, and see him as much as you can. Given all your problems with him, I would think it fair to give him 1-2 years on a windy hillside somewhere to be a horse and see if a long break can fix him. Then unless you are happy to do that for the foreseeable, if he doesn't come back rideable, let him go. That way he gets some time to repair, relax, retire before any decisions are made. equally if you want to keep him in retirement livery until he's no longer happy, then do that too, I know you love him and have a strong bond and I would find it very hard myself to put down a horse I loved that is field sound ish, happy just unrideable. xx
 
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