Am I ready for a horse?

Joined
17 December 2019
Messages
2
Hello, recently the chances of me getting a horse of my own have risen up insanely, but I'm quite nervous about it.
I'm a 14 yrs old girl, quite insecure about everything, soon gonna complete 15, and I have 2 siblings my age (We're triplets). My trainer told us that we are on level 3 of 4 about riding skills (kinda like a 'system' here), and I honestly try and put a lot of effort every time I'm riding (I like to think that since I don't have a horse of my own, the best I can do is make ever ride worth).
I have been riding now for 5 years but I never loaned any horse since this type of business only started 2 years ago and my mother doesn't really like the idea of sharing something as expensive as a horse (believe me, I have tried to convince her)
I ride in 2 places: my school and a barn that is 15/20 minutes from my own house, and usually ride 2/3 days a week, 2/3 horses each day (I ride other people's horse if they don't want to/are traveling (I don't get and would never want to get paid for it)
In 2019 I showed in 1,00 classes with 2 horses, but I don't know about 2020, both my siblings ride as well (my sister has also been riding for 5 years while my brother has for 3).
My dad is getting interested on the matter ever since we went to a show where he found out his friend from work also is on the equestrian world showing on 1.40 classes, he told me & my siblings last week that he doesn't want to spend more than $40k on horses (the horses, not involving livery, lessons and equipment), we already know how much would it be to keep the horses on the barn we currently ride and buying all the starter things and we could do it.
My siblings are really excited but I'm a little scared about, it feels like what I've been waiting for my whole life is coming, but what if it's not the best option?
I have handled a lot of different horses (though more hot horses than cold ones) and that's what I like the most about the sport, but still, what if it is not the right time? I would absolutely love to have a horse of my own, see and change things to what would be best for him, being able to do all the things like lunging, take a walk with him alone or just spend time looking at him the stall, but what if it is not the best for me or for the horse?
The plan is for us to start to try horses after winter break, since the horses where I live are currently entering vacations, I have already searcher a little about the horses for sale on the area but there are few horses for sale in my area (my country is evolving on the equestrian aspect) but a warmblood mare took my interest, she's 12 and can do 1,20 classes (the class that I wish to be able to do some day, obviously it would take some years even if I did have my own horse, since I currently can't go to more than 1,00 at shows because the horses aren't mine), though I want to make sure if she does jump 1,20 and if she would be the best horse for me. My friend who's the vet of one of the places I ride and owns horses (never sells any that she buys) offered to help us find horses that would be the best for us, but I have the ''cold feet''. It would be nice to have a look from outside eyes about the situation. Any answer would be helpful, sorry for my bad english and thanks!
 
Joined
19 July 2010
Messages
20,533
As a 14 year old, potential first time horse owner, the most important thing is the amount of support that you have in place.

So are you your parents willing to put in the financial support and also the time that they need to drive you to the stables and back? What support will the livery yard give you? Would you care for the horse yourself or is it full livery? If you are unsure about something, is there someone who you could ask?

Make sure you get a horse that gives you confidence when riding and is easy to handle on the ground. There is nothing worse (especially if you can be nervous anyway) than being frightened of you own horse. This is more important than how big it could jump in the future. It is no good if the horse could jump the moon but you don't want to get on it.
 
Joined
17 December 2019
Messages
2
Thanks for answering, I’m absolutely going to consider what you said on the choices.
I saw more of the mare that I said on the post today and she seems a little bit crazy, so I’m going to ask my trainer if I am ready for her, my brother said that we should get younger horses (like 5-10 years old) but I think I would rather get an older but not too old (something between 10 and 14) since it would be our first horses, any tips or recommendations?
 

equi

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 October 2010
Messages
10,118
Location
Mini land
If you are ready for a horse, buy one that suits your level now, not one that will suit you in a few years when you are ready to do what it already does now. That will only end in disaster. The best person to get you a horse can be your teacher, they know your skill level and what you aim to achieve.
 

Shay

Well-Known Member
Joined
17 August 2008
Messages
7,195
I presume you are assessed using the "galop" french system? Level 3/4 equates to just over BHS Stage 1. As equi says you need to get a horse which suits you now, not one which you might want for later. Its easy to loose confidence if you over horse yourself.
 

Trouper

Well-Known Member
Joined
11 May 2015
Messages
630
Firstly, I think your English is excellent and, secondly, I think you may be over-thinking this. You sound as if you have a decent amount of riding experience behind you so, as long as you choose a horse which matches your current abilities, I am sure you will be fine. There is so much to learn with a first horse that it is really important to choose one that is right for your riding abilities now and then that leaves you free to learn about him, his stable management and all the feeding/health issues we all need to learn when we take on a horse for ourselves. If you have a help with most of this from a livery yard to start with, then that will teach you a lot while you are spending time hanging out with him and getting to know him.
It can feel daunting but it is also very exciting so don't let yourself be put off by your anxieties. You will make mistakes - all of us on here have!! And no matter how old you get, you will still keep learning new things about horses. It is a fascinating journey.
 

Mister Ted

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 August 2012
Messages
387
You havent mentioned one of the most important aspects, being knowledgeable enough to look after one.! If you do and are just nervous about the expense of looking after a horse or if something goes wrong I am sure that will pass in a few months if you are confident everything is in place to cover the common things like vet,farrier etc. It will take time and patience at first as it will be strange for your new horse but the more you spend time with it you will become good friends .
 
Top