Am i taking it too slowly or am i doing the right thing

hopppydi

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Grrr to the weather..
I have now had my ex racer 2 and a half weeks and so far so good. He seems to be settling in well and has got into his new routine nicely. He has been out of racing about a year and has done very little since except for a bit of hacking out and following the hunt a few times in the winter. He has been roughed off for approx 12 weeks now and seems to be enjoying the time out. My question is am i taking things too slowly? I have had a nice new saddle fitted and had a little walk round on him on sunday, just for a couple of minutes in the field. I admit part of me was quite nervous, i am desperate for it to go right as he is such a lovely boy!! He tried to walk backwards to start with but kind words from me and he walked on nicely.
smile.gif

Has anyone else had a ex racer, how long did you give them to settle in before you started re educating?
 

rowdreyer

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Hi I have had mine about 8 weeks now! He only finished racing in Jan. he still gets very exited everytime i bring him in a he things hes going exersising or racing! I'v had problems with keeping shoes on, nail bind (so lame for a few days), lack of proper fitting saddle, being away for 2 weeks on holiday and last weekend he was freezemarked under his saddle. Tonight is the night I'll be getting on him again and have a short lesson booked for tommorrow. I am nervous if I'm honest, although he hasn't put a foot wrong when I have ridden him (sporadically!) in the last couple of months I lost my nerve with my last horse and really want to do everything right by this guy! I think you just have to do things in your own time, everyone on my yard really pressurises me to start 'doing things' but there is no rush, we've got years to enjoy them!
 

Nailed

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I had Ted a week. New shoes, Teeth New saddle and I started working him..

I was never nervous of him, he'd only been out of racing a couple of months, was still half fit And was still perfect in everyway.

Never put a foot wrong, was just a Leg end!

Lou x
 

Pearlsasinger

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My instinctive reply just from reading the post title ( before I opened the thread) was "Go at the pace you are comfortable with).
After reading your post, my answer is exactly the same. Your horse will need time to consolidate everything you teach him so it's best not to rush. Take absolutely no notice of any-one who says "Why haven't you.........yet?", try to ensure that every new step is a step forward for you and the horse.
Enjoy!
 

Janah

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Whatever feels right to you is right. Do as much or as little as suits YOU. I would try and vary groundwork and ridden work.

Best of luck

Jane
 

Faro

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I don't think you can ever go too slowly.

The only reason for rushing is for financial gain or the owner's desparate need to compete at a particular event - e.g. you need to produce the horse quickly to sell / to achieve a certain important competition.

As others have said above, unless this is the case, then take his learning at the speed you feel comfortable with. You'll end up with a much more relaxed, stress free horse at the end of it.

I absolutely refuse to be pressurised into rushing any of my boys - the truth is you probably wouldn't believe how green their ridden work is for their respective ages - but they're not going anywhere away from me, I can compete them all at the level which we are both happy with (and if I don't quite make it to a "special" event because we aren't ready, then there's always next year), I thoroughly enjoy them, bringing them on at my own pace - and most important of all, it is obvious to anyone who sees them that they are happy, contented, stress free horses.
 

hopppydi

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Thanks for all the positive comments..its much appreciated. I am so pleased there are people out there who think the same as me. I am not in a big rush, owninga horse and being around such a handsome and kind boy is enough for me though obviously hacking out is the next step. I am not a competitive rider and am far more interested in having a happy, chilled out horse. Its just that alot of locals have started to nag me into riding him out and seem to think its because im scared, which i am not. He is only just turned 7 and i am planning on owning him till the day he dies, i am very lucky as i have my own field and stables and work from home so am in a position to do this. Maybe im abit to chilled out but i just cant see the rush!!
 

Fazzie

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[ QUOTE ]
Better to take small steps forwards rather than 5 steps back because you've rushed and been impatient
smile.gif


[/ QUOTE ]

Well said
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