Anyone's horse experienced these performance related symptoms?

measles

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One of ours who is relatively new - we've had her 2 mths - who windsucks mildly is very reluctant to move off the leg and almost grinds to a half if you sit down on her back whilst being ridden in canter (not a good thing for a showjumper). She also makes faces and tail swishes when being girthed up. We've had a full lameness work up by my own vet and at the vet school and no one can find anything wrong. Her joints have been xrayed and the plates showed no issues, and this is in addition to the 5 stage vetting I had done and which she passed with flying colours. I've also had a physio give her a full MOT and we're working on some general muscle stretches but again no major problems were found. Oh, and full tack check and teeth rasp.

So, I'm left wondering what the problem is - she's telling me she has one and I need to get to the bottom of it for her sake. She has a good rider and is a very experienced, fit and seemingly healthy girl, so why on earth is she unhappy?

Do you think it would be worthwhile investigating for gastric ulcers? Any other thoughts or advice would be much appreciated too.
 

measles

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[ QUOTE ]
Seems like an upset tummy would be the next obvious thing as you have eliminated so much else, any possibility of referred pain?

[/ QUOTE ]

What sort of thing were you thinking of by referred pain? I'm planning an endoscopy later this week to check for gastric ulcers..
 

ajn1610

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Trapped/damaged nerves, maybe something cranial/dental? I know you've had her teeth rasped but could there be something in her jaw? In people certain intestinal cancers can present as chronic back pain. Could she been anticipating pain that is no longer present? Just making suggestions not being terribly helpful really! Sorry!
 

Parkranger

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Interesting - Oscar was a complete sod for hollowing his back when groomed, ridden and jumping....he's had a month off after being kicked and is generally alot better to do.

He was jumped quite a bit in his old home and I'm wondering if it was related.....

Hope you work out what it is soon.
 

hellybelly6

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Referred pain in one area, but felt in another.

If she doesnt have PCs, it could well be a gastric ulcer or I do not like to say it kissing spines perhaps.
 

Booosh

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Sounds like a candidate for Coligone - our little Tb eventer was mis / grumpy ( and not really his nature) He has been on Coligone for a week now and hey hey happy horse!
He had had blood tests/worm counts the lot and I suspected it was something to do with his insides - was going to get him scoped as he is an ex racer then ulcers may be a prob - however tried the coligone and I have to say it has made a big difference and if you look on the website it also says it helps with windsucking ( smells of aniseed/liquorice and our horse almost sucks it out of the syringe by himself) Worth a try?
 

Booboos

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Similar problems with mine turned out to be caused by the saddle (despite having it checked by saddler, physio and vet), so maybe try different tack and see what happens?
 

13798

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I would suspect saddle. Not that I blame the saddler but some X racers TB s can very very sensative to a saddle that is a little tight or pinches a bit etc.
 

Flame_

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Usually, when there seems to be back problems, the root of the problem is in the feet, legs or both. The back problems are often secondary from compensating.

ETA... I had lots of vets and experts give my horses the all clear before they were finally diagnosed. Both needed MRI and various scans. IMO change vets, keep looking but accept some genuine physical problems are just not understood or diagnosable yet.
 

whatawizard

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i would certainly pursue the ulcer route, especially if your feeding and routine are different. With my ex racer if I change the slightest thing, routine or foodwise he will immediately start to become stressed and crib which he doesn't do when he's happy. I have to make sure he has access to either grazing or hay ad lib at all times and manage his diet really carefully. supplement wise, when he was first diagnosed and in poor condition I used U guard very successfully but I now use a product from silver lining herbs which keeps everything functioning.
 
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