Awkward buyers

Jemerdo

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<font color="green"> </font> Does anybody know of a legal way that the vendor can obtain a copy of a vetting certificate if the buyer won't let you see it. I'm so frustrated that at a vetting in the New Forest on Monday, my horse "failed" but the buyers have refused to let me see a certificate, speak to the vet or indeed allow my vet to speak to him. I've even offered to pay for the vetting in order to obtain the best information on my horse. Needless to say I'm keeping him, but what reasonable person would withold the info. I can't even find if a blood test was taken - which is odd seeing I actually own the horse! I smell a rat.
 

hellybelly6

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I suspect that they are angling to pay less for your horse by 'fibing' about the vetting.

Unfortunately, I cannot advise you legally, but you could try your local citizens advice Centre.

There are some dishonest people out there.
 

Maisy

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Can you not just call the vet?....I wouldnt have thought that a reasonable vet would refuse to let you know what it failed on....
 

stranger1612

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No, the details are privileged for whoever instructed the veterinary surgeon. You or your representative should have signed a form to give permission for a blood sample to be taken and there is a copy of this form for you to keep. If you don't have such a form then I would think it unlikely that blood was taken.
 

Skhosu

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I would think they are trying to get a lower price, I would leave them to it and take your horse to your vet for a work up.
 

Jemerdo

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No, Liphook - as with all vets, need the written permission of the buyer before they can release vetting information to any third party. Confidentiality and all that PC nonsense. The buyers have refused to give permission.
 

Jemerdo

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Unfortunatly, I have come to the same conclusion - dishonesty must be the only reason for witholding the certificate. Arn't people odd - they came across as decent "eventing types" and yet act no better than scoundrels.
 

Chwee

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In situations such as this the whole 'confidentiality' rule really doesn't seem logical.

Even more illogical - I recently bought a horse and called an insurance company, coincidentally he was insured with them already - fine - I accepted the quote and went to take out the policy when they told me there were exemptions on there- but they couldn't actually tell me what they were... due to 'confidentiality'...I honestly wish I was making this up!
 

flowerlady

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That's stupid. If you had taken out the insurance it would state on it what they were so why couldn't they read out to you what they were going to put on the policy anyway? I'd also ring the previous owners presumebly you bought sound in wind and limb and no known illnesses?

So ask them what were the excemptions on the insurance?
 

dozzie

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Seems a bit mean to me. Why not tell the vendor? Especially if they are backing out of the sale. If they are trying to knock you down on the price then I would think you have a right to know why. I suppose each to their own.
 

henryhorn

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Easy answer, book the same vet for a vetting yourself...
wink.gif

Sounds to me they were perhaps advised it may not be up to the purpose which is why they couldn't pinpoint any obvious fault. Though quite how vets can advise on that I'll never understand unless they ride themselves.
 

Chwee

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In the end they called the ex owner and got his permission to tell me... The logic of taking the policy and having the exemptions on there didn't seem to make sense to them.

They were minor exemptions on non reoccurring things, so no big deal - but crazy trying to have a rational conversation with a call centre person quoting 'client confidentiality' - made me think that the vet had super glued his leg back on or something, when in fact, he had an infected sweat gland two years ago...
 

Hollycat

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[ QUOTE ]
Unfortunatly, I have come to the same conclusion - dishonesty must be the only reason for witholding the certificate. Arn't people odd - they came across as decent "eventing types" and yet act no better than scoundrels.

[/ QUOTE ]

I think your being a bit unfair! If the horse failed they may feel you are the dishonest one!!!!! The bottom line is the buyers no longer want to purchase the horse. Unless you had it in writing that the horse was sold subject to it passing a vetting, then there is nothing you can do. Yes, you could call them timewasters but they have just spent about £200 on having the horse vetted so they either have reservations about the horses health following the vetting or they have reservations that the horse is the right one for them. They have probably changed their mind and are very embarressed so want to pretend he failed the vetting. If he is unsuitable for these people better for all involved that you find out now than the horse goes to a home where he will be unhappy. Best thing you can do if you are worried about the horses health is as henryhorn suggests, to have a vetting carried out by your own vet. If nothing else it will put your mind at rest that your horse is healthy and will pass a vetting should you get another buyer.

I was on the opposite end of the stick recently when the horse I had vetted failed spectacularly and was only suitable for light hacking. The sellers lied through their teeth, saying the horse had never been lame etc etc. I phoned the seller and explained the vet reccommended an immediate MRI and would happily have given them the vets certificate and got the vet to explain the horses problems. However they continued to insist the horse had never had a lame day in hs life - kind of gave it away when they said 'his last scan was clear'. Errr - why was he having any scans done if he'd never had a lame step in his life???? Poor horse is now being advertised for loan - they are obviously hoping some poor sod will take him without vetting him
frown.gif
This is a household name dressage rider too - not some horrid crooked dealers yard.

So it works both ways!
 
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