Breaking in a 10 yr old??

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23 September 2012
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I'd say yes...I know a few broodmares and one stallion who were broke to ride from 9 - 13 years. They were all well handled, calm horses and most of the mares had been shown so were used to people doing things.

How's the mare temperament and behaviour in general?

I would be worried about her having been started before and something having gone wrong but if she's a decent sort, I'd take a chance.

Clydes aren't exactly common broken and going anyway!
 

Lintel

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Depends on the price.
Recently been stung by a project pony who definitely had been "backed" and ruined before. Sadly I didn't have the time to work through his issues so he went to a lovely place and I lost all my money. But it was money I could afford to lose.

If she was a nice sort and a good price of probably take the risk. Afterall she can always go back to being a broodmare if it doesn't work out.

I'd also be interested how many owners she had.
Good luck OP.
 

AdorableAlice

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Clydes are peaceful types but I think I would still get a pro to break a 10 year old.

A friend bought a Woodlander brood mare that had been broken very late. It proved to be a nightmare in all ways. Green as grass and the new owner had not factored in the stress of a new home for a horse kept in a breeding herd for years and then expected to live with one other companion.
 

be positive

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I would want a plan b in place before taking her on, she may be fine but if she proves tricky or not up to the work you want to do it would be hard to pass her on, not sure if going back to breeding is a great idea if she goes lame or otherwise unsuitable and there is still the job of finding that home, you may find she is perfect but like most cheap horses they can prove expensive in the long run, take time looking and find what you really want, you will need to compromise but there are less risky ways to do so.
 

Quadro

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Currently breaking a rising 7 year old. Sat on her yesterday no bother at all. Yet to move under saddle though. Have had various reasons to why she isn't broken yet, but no different to 3 year olds
 

AdorableAlice

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Currently breaking a rising 7 year old. Sat on her yesterday no bother at all. Yet to move under saddle though. Have had various reasons to why she isn't broken yet, but no different to 3 year olds
That is great, but we can't surmise that all older unbroken horses are actually unbroken. There will be plenty around that people have tried and failed/ruined in the process that then reappear for sale as unbroken. Direct from a breeder would probably be genuine but through a dealer would be a real risk.
 

Quadro

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Yes of course, and this mare has been started before, by a novice who made a mess of it, but if you start from scratch like a 3 year, pretending the horse knows nothing, it is the same process. Perhaps quicker in some areas, slower in others
 

Gloi

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I've broken in a few older pony brood mares without any problem. It wouldn't worry me, having foals I think makes them more accepting of things than one that age that has done nothing.
 

ycbm

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That is great, but we can't surmise that all older unbroken horses are actually unbroken. There will be plenty around that people have tried and failed/ruined in the process that then reappear for sale as unbroken. Direct from a breeder would probably be genuine but through a dealer would be a real risk.

And the other trick is to turn a lame horse away for a year and then sell it as unbroken. I've bought two of those, I think. Both so easy to break it was ridiculous and already knew far too much. The second one went lame some time after I sold him, and on MRI was seen to have pre-existing scarring of the collateral ligaments.
 

Gloi

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And the other trick is to turn a lame horse away for a year and then sell it as unbroken. I've bought two of those, I think. Both so easy to break it was ridiculous and already knew far too much. The second one went lame some time after I sold him, and on MRI was seen to have pre-existing scarring of the collateral ligaments.
Yes you do have to be careful where the animals come from. Fortunately I've been okay because I've bought native brood mares from people I know that they've only used them at stud and although some have rather lacked much handling have all been okay. I'd be much more wary of an older gelding as having been lame, failed or ruined in training.
 

Goldenstar

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I broke Tatts to ride at ten he was driven before that so he had been fit and worked in the past .
In a big ten year old ex breeding draught mare you are going to have to develop the back very carefully or you risk doing a shed load of work and then getting hock and back issues .
You need to be prepared to give the horse time to settle to the change in lifestyle because that can take ex brood mares time .
 
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Thanks for all of the replies. I've decided not to go there as it's a bit chance and I cannot financially afford for it to go too wrong.
I'll just keep looking and trying to increase my budget :)
 
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Probably a good decision. Brood mares sometimes have back issues and lack the topline needed to carry saddle and rider. At 10 this may be difficult to build back. I speak from bitter experience!
 
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